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Deck refinishing advise

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  • Jun 4th, 2021 9:00 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Mar 3, 2020
32 posts
10 upvotes

Deck refinishing advise

Looking to refinish my deck. Possible DIY tips and tools needed for a good output. Have seen a few videos, also wanted to hear from you guys. Check the pics for the current state. Thanks.
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10 replies
Member
Jan 1, 2006
279 posts
38 upvotes
Richmond Hill
You have two roads to choose from:

One road is to choose a solid stain. This will cover the grain of the wood and conceal the areas in which the existing stain has peeled.

The second road is to choose a semi transparent stain. This will show the grain of the wood. But it will mean you would have to remove your existing stain before applying the new stain.
Member
Jan 1, 2006
279 posts
38 upvotes
Richmond Hill
backbones wrote: You have two roads to choose from:

One road is to choose a solid stain. This will cover the grain of the wood and conceal the areas in which the existing stain has peeled.

The second road is to choose a semi transparent stain. This will show the grain of the wood. But it will mean you would have to remove your existing stain before applying the new stain.
Which means if you go the second route choose a semi transparent stain that does not peel! Which means that maintenance coats in future years will not require you to remove the existing stains before proceeding.

A product that does not peel is Cutek Extreme, but it costs more.
Deal Addict
Oct 18, 2004
4844 posts
1383 upvotes
Wat
Flip the boards, use a cleaner to clean the boards and then apply cutek extreme?
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Mar 3, 2020
32 posts
10 upvotes
What are the steps involved here ? Clean, Pressure wash and stain? Please help me understand the process.
Newbie
Apr 27, 2021
4 posts
2 upvotes
Burlington, Ontario
I was in a similar situation, older PT never stained deck from a previous owner (12’x16’). I did a semi transparent stain last summer...Cabot, but forget the colour. To make a long story short, it was too dark and didn’t last, I noticed lifting off in some sections this spring. With the the cost of lumber replacing the boards would have been $800, so I flipped, sanded with an orbital sander, and used a gallon of Cutek with Goldtone. Sanding was time consuming and hard on the knees...but looks fantastic and would highly recommend.
Member
Jan 1, 2006
279 posts
38 upvotes
Richmond Hill
periyava1894 wrote: What are the steps involved here ? Clean, Pressure wash and stain? Please help me understand the process.
Let's say you ultimately want to use a semi transparent stain. You will have to get rid of your old existing stain. There are a couple of ways to remove, each with their pros and cons.

1) Use chemical stain strippers. In my experience the results have always been moderate at best because you will always have some stubborn residual stain remaining. There will be the temptation to expedite the process by rinsing away the stripper with a power washer and you will see the old stain removed. However you run the risk of damaging your wood from getting too close to the wood and/or using too high of a pressure setting. You would then have to sand off the rest of the remaining stain. Use a brightener after you use a stripper to neutralize the stripper prior to staining.

2) Use a sander. But you will have first have to countersink the nails that are sticking up so that your sandpaper doesn't get torn to shred. Depending on the size of your deck, you can rent ones for floors or decks. Or you can use belt sanders or orbitals sanders for smaller decks or tighter spaces. I have found that 40 grit is good for removing the stain, and then 60 grit is good for smoothing the wood before staining.
Member
Jan 1, 2006
279 posts
38 upvotes
Richmond Hill
backbones wrote: Let's say you ultimately want to use a semi transparent stain. You will have to get rid of your old existing stain. There are a couple of ways to remove, each with their pros and cons.

1) Use chemical stain strippers. In my experience the results have always been moderate at best because you will always have some stubborn residual stain remaining. There will be the temptation to expedite the process by rinsing away the stripper with a power washer and you will see the old stain removed. However you run the risk of damaging your wood from getting too close to the wood and/or using too high of a pressure setting. You would then have to sand off the rest of the remaining stain. Use a brightener after you use a stripper to neutralize the stripper prior to staining.

2) Use a sander. But you will have first have to countersink the nails that are sticking up so that your sandpaper doesn't get torn to shred. Depending on the size of your deck, you can rent ones for floors or decks. Or you can use belt sanders or orbitals sanders for smaller decks or tighter spaces. I have found that 40 grit is good for removing the stain, and then 60 grit is good for smoothing the wood before staining.
So as you can see, removing an old stain is a pain in the butt. However, if you choose a semitransparent stain that doesn't peel or flake off, then you will only have to do it this one time. Any future applications in subsequent years would simply involve washing the dirt etc off your deck, and the reapplying the same stain.

Choosing the right stain at the start therefore is key, as well as properly preparing the wood for its first application!
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
1533 posts
1668 upvotes
West GTA
You have a film forming stain on there, looks like. Easiest thing to do is to use a solid stain (aka paint), then once that starts to go you just replace the wood (or paint over it again).

The nicest looking way (in my opinion) is to remove the stain and redo it with a nice penetrating semitransparent stain. Removing film forming stains is a nightmare, however. Stripper won't work that well, works way better for penetrating stains - power sanding will be required. Start with 50 grit, finish with 80 grit and although you can do a lot of it with an oscillating floor sander (careful with screws poking up), you'll still have hours on your hands and knees. Vacuum, use a nice penetrating stain (Cutek, Sansin are two great brands), enjoy.
Member
Feb 3, 2012
288 posts
155 upvotes
T.O.
Wiseman wrote: Flip the boards, use a cleaner to clean the boards and then apply cutek extreme?
I would have flipped the boards on my old deck if it were held down by screws. It was nailed to the joists and it's almost impossible to lift the boards up without damaging them. I ended up using a orbital sander and stripped the old stain and mildew off the boards. Finished the deck with timber oil and it looked amazing like brand new. Now into the second summer I can see the stain has faded somewhat, but should hold up for this year till reapplication next spring/summer.
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2007
828 posts
72 upvotes
Richmond Hill
How old is your deck? Is it cedar?

I have a 8 year old cedar deck which I’ve sanded and stained a few times using Cabots timber oil but the vertical surfaces never last and won’t with our harsh weather.

I’m about to sand and stain agin and go with cutek this time as I’ve heard good things

Once you’ve sanded you want to apply the stain right after cleaning it. You don’t want it to get wet again

So for yours I would use a chemical stripper to try and get most of the old stain off. Will require some scrubbing and wash it all off. Then sand with 60grit or something lower if the older stain is left
Once it’s all off and you’re happy with it and moisture levels of the wood are ok apply the stain.

Think it requires a second coat but follow the instructions. Then inspect it every year and re apply before it gets bad

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