Home & Garden

Dehumidifier for my basement

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 5th, 2021 12:33 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 14, 2011
78 posts
19 upvotes
EAST YORK

Dehumidifier for my basement

Hi, I am living in basement and don't feel comfort at night time. Up stair cooling is OK but not sure why cooling is not good in basement and thermostat also shows the 21c. I am thinking to buy Dehumidifier for my basement. What is the good Dehumidifier which I can use for my basement? Thanks,
17 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 27, 2006
3832 posts
871 upvotes
Not so easy there Ma…
Maybe a Frigidaire... Frankly most new dehumidifiers have a shorter lifespan than the vintage ones because they're now cheaply made and increasing efficiency standards haven't helped the manufacturing process either. The dehumidifier will make the basement drier and feel less clammy but as a byproduct they give off heat and will raise the temperature somewhat. You should choose the right size for the area.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
16495 posts
18049 upvotes
Oakville
Before you buy a dehumidifier, buy a cheap humidity sensor and determine if that is your problem. You want humidity between 30-50%.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2044 posts
1021 upvotes
London
shakilhyd wrote: Up stair cooling is OK but not sure why cooling is not good in basement and thermostat also shows the 21c.
fergy wrote: The dehumidifier will make the basement drier and feel less clammy but as a byproduct they give off heat and will raise the temperature somewhat.
Listen to fergy.
If you are wanting to cool the basement more, a dehumidifier will have the opposite effect.
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2009
773 posts
424 upvotes
GTA
If you're only uncomfortable at night, try buying a fan. It won't change the temperature but it will make you feel cooler by moving the air around.

I'll add that we just bought a dehumidifier because we had the problem that our daughter's basement bedroom was very cold and slightly clammy-feeling. It's made a world of difference by lowering the humidity, but it's also raised the temp by a few degrees (which is what we needed but not what you would want).
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 12, 2009
20660 posts
8830 upvotes
Toronto
jrbb0309 wrote: If you're only uncomfortable at night, try buying a fan. It won't change the temperature but it will make you feel cooler by moving the air around.

I'll add that we just bought a dehumidifier because we had the problem that our daughter's basement bedroom was very cold and slightly clammy-feeling. It's made a world of difference by lowering the humidity, but it's also raised the temp by a few degrees (which is what we needed but not what you would want).
A fan will not do anything to lower relative humidity. The problem with basements is generally the lower temperature which elevates relative humidity. A humidifier is the only solution. Letting relative humidity go too high will promote mold growth. I try to keep the basement to 50% RH or less throughout the year.
̶K̶o̶o̶d̶o̶ ̶$̶4̶0̶/̶6̶G̶B̶
Public Mobile 2016 fall promo, $23/1GB, $38/5GB
Fido $0.00/4GB+tablet
Tangerine Bank, EQ Bank, Simplii
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2044 posts
1021 upvotes
London
will888 wrote: A fan will not do anything to lower relative humidity. The problem with basements is generally the lower temperature which elevates relative humidity. A humidifier is the only solution. Letting relative humidity go too high will promote mold growth. I try to keep the basement to 50% RH or less throughout the year.
jrbb... never suggested a fan will lower humidity, but it could help comfort.

Although usually basements are cooler and it is a factor, it isn't the only issue.
They are sources of humidity such as through foundations.
Often lack of circulation means excess moisture doesn't dissipate. (a fan could help this, depending on circumstances)

I'm sure you meant "A de-humidifier is the only solution"
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2009
773 posts
424 upvotes
GTA
will888 wrote: A fan will not do anything to lower relative humidity. The problem with basements is generally the lower temperature which elevates relative humidity. A humidifier is the only solution. Letting relative humidity go too high will promote mold growth. I try to keep the basement to 50% RH or less throughout the year.
I never suggested a fan would do anything to lower relative humidity. I suggested that given OP's explanation of his problem that he might need a fan (simply to cool himself) instead of a dehumidifier which may only make the basement warmer. He needs to get a hygrometer and figure out what the issue is. But if the basement is 21C, that's not a bad temperature. Our daughter's room was 17C and the humidity was 65% before we got our dehumidifier. Now her room is 21-22 and the humidity is roughly 40-45%
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6419 posts
3440 upvotes
Mississauga
I think from a comfort standpoint it's better to be a little warm and dry than cold and clammy.

Even though central a/c dehumidifies to a certain extent, we run a dehumidifier in our finished basement and it makes a noticeable improvement to overall comfort.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 27, 2006
3832 posts
871 upvotes
Not so easy there Ma…
jrbb0309 wrote: I never suggested a fan would do anything to lower relative humidity. I suggested that given OP's explanation of his problem that he might need a fan (simply to cool himself) instead of a dehumidifier which may only make the basement warmer. He needs to get a hygrometer and figure out what the issue is. But if the basement is 21C, that's not a bad temperature. Our daughter's room was 17C and the humidity was 65% before we got our dehumidifier. Now her room is 21-22 and the humidity is roughly 40-45%
I'm surprised the dehumidifier raises the temperature that much. Does she keep the door closed or does it raise the temp of a larger area by that much?

Also, would that be in the summer with or without the AC running? I recently bought one but haven't required the use of it yet.
Jr. Member
Apr 30, 2020
151 posts
139 upvotes
Vancouver
the last apartment i lived in had humidity problems.
it was up into the 70% range often.
I got a dehumidifier and it definitely worked, but it's loud and annoying that it's basically running all the time..
some tips are, keep your windows open a crack all the time, run your range fan when cooking, the bathroom fan when taking a shower, and even a room fan with the window open helps.
Also pull your blinds up part way all the time so that air can circulate properly out the window.

as someone else said, get a humidity monitor first, they cost like $20. if none of those tips help you very much then get a dehumidifier, the best and quietest one you can afford
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
16495 posts
18049 upvotes
Oakville
fergy wrote: I'm surprised the dehumidifier raises the temperature that much. Does she keep the door closed or does it raise the temp of a larger area by that much?

Also, would that be in the summer with or without the AC running? I recently bought one but haven't required the use of it yet.
It does if it's running constantly. I recommend getting one with digital settings so you can precisely set it. Also get one that can be hooked up to a drain if you can, then you never have to empty it.
If your basement is stale, especially if you're living down there, I highly recommend getting a radon and CO2 sensor like the Airthings Wave. Hi radon levels can give you lung cancer, and high CO2 impairs your brain and can make you feel like crap.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Sr. Member
Oct 19, 2020
527 posts
335 upvotes
GTA
shakilhyd wrote: Hi, I am living in basement and don't feel comfort at night time. Up stair cooling is OK but not sure why cooling is not good in basement and thermostat also shows the 21c. I am thinking to buy Dehumidifier for my basement. What is the good Dehumidifier which I can use for my basement? Thanks,
You're in east-york?
Lots of 100+ year old houses with poor duct systems.

Most of these houses do need dehumidifiers in their basements, but before you spend to money, check to see if you have return air in the basement. When the a/c is running long enough, with basement return air, shouldn't need to run a dehumidifier.
Should need it when cooling isn't running much or at all, in the summer.

If you own the house, add basement return air if there isn't one, it should make a big difference.
If you're a renter and the owner is nice enough, maybe suggest it.

All dehumidifiers now are poor quality unless you spend around $1000.
But if you end up buying a new one anyhow, costco online is selling a 40 pint for under $200 with a 2 year warranty; this is probably the best deal right now.
The new 40 pints replace the old 50s to 60s -> the way capacity is measured has changed.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 14, 2011
78 posts
19 upvotes
EAST YORK
insertname2020 wrote: You're in east-york?
Lots of 100+ year old houses with poor duct systems.

Most of these houses do need dehumidifiers in their basements, but before you spend to money, check to see if you have return air in the basement. When the a/c is running long enough, with basement return air, shouldn't need to run a dehumidifier.
Should need it when cooling isn't running much or at all, in the summer.

If you own the house, add basement return air if there isn't one, it should make a big difference.
If you're a renter and the owner is nice enough, maybe suggest it.

All dehumidifiers now are poor quality unless you spend around $1000.
But if you end up buying a new one anyhow, costco online is selling a 40 pint for under $200 with a 2 year warranty; this is probably the best deal right now.
The new 40 pints replace the old 50s to 60s -> the way capacity is measured has changed.
Which brand of dehumidifiers will you recommend?
Sr. Member
Oct 19, 2020
527 posts
335 upvotes
GTA
I believe all the box store brands are made by 2 or 3 low quality chinese manufacturers.
So just find the best deal.
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2009
773 posts
424 upvotes
GTA
fergy wrote: I'm surprised the dehumidifier raises the temperature that much. Does she keep the door closed or does it raise the temp of a larger area by that much?

Also, would that be in the summer with or without the AC running? I recently bought one but haven't required the use of it yet.
We were really surprised as well but we had our hygrometer (which we knew was accurate from using in other areas of the house and which also shows temperature) in her room for 2-3 days before we got the dehumidifier. She does not keep the door closed but we're in a four-level split bungalow (main floor = kitchen, dining, living; upper = master suite; lower = rec room; and basement = daughter's bedroom, second bath, furnace room and laundry room) and it seems to keep things more comfortable on the whole basement level.

This is in the summer - we have a humidifier on the furnace for the winter and run it quite low, just enough for comfort again - WITH the AC running.

She also turns it off at night as she can't stand the noise (it's not loud but she's a light sleeper) but the temperature/humidity both stay at a more reasonable level.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
16495 posts
18049 upvotes
Oakville
shakilhyd wrote: Which brand of dehumidifiers will you recommend?
I have a 10 year old Danby that's seen a lot of run time. Canadian company I believe, but probably made in west Taiwan.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
5832 posts
4124 upvotes
19°C and 70% humidity is less comfortable than 22°C with 50% humidity... A de-humidifier will raise the temperature (compressor releases heat) BUT once it reaches the programmed humidity rate (let say 50%) compressor will stop, and only the fan works...

Top