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  • May 12th, 2021 4:52 pm
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Sr. Member
Feb 26, 2019
606 posts
659 upvotes
Ottawa
Could be a few reasons why the price is higher. Hard to say without seeing the ducting run plan. How much work has been done? If the place framed? Drywalled? For example, if it needs to go through a bulkhead, the new duct may not fit, and he needs to call back a carpenter or drywaller.

Or maybe it’s a brick wall and now he needs to core a 10” hole and needs to rent equipment for that. Or call back a sub to do it. Who knows. Did you ask him why it’s so high?

I agree that if the build hasn’t started, the price seems high. But if work has begun and your making a change late in the game ... then yeah, you’re going pay.

I would suggest you ignore the posters suggesting you take short cuts with the size of ducting needed. Penny wise pound foolish, imho.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
18479 posts
13272 upvotes
Markham
I think the issue isn't that the builder is taking advantage of you, the issue is communication.
Was it communicated to the builder what you were planning on putting in at the outset and therefore did he quote/take this into account in his pricing. If he priced based on standard builder stuff, I think he's ok to ask for more money. The issue is how much is right? Educating yourself on what is required is not a bad idea...because the contractor will be less likely to be in "take" mode if you know what you're talking about.

In general with any contractor, it doesn't even matter if everything is communicated, you need a contingency and IMO plan for the contingency to be taken by the contractor for something. It is painful that it's nickels and dimes when you look at the big picture but those nickels are not small amounts.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
7588 posts
3366 upvotes
dottawat wrote: Could be a few reasons why the price is higher. Hard to say without seeing the ducting run plan. How much work has been done? If the place framed? Drywalled? For example, if it needs to go through a bulkhead, the new duct may not fit, and he needs to call back a carpenter or drywaller.

Or maybe it’s a brick wall and now he needs to core a 10” hole and needs to rent equipment for that. Or call back a sub to do it. Who knows. Did you ask him why it’s so high?

I agree that if the build hasn’t started, the price seems high. But if work has begun and your making a change late in the game ... then yeah, you’re going pay.

I would suggest you ignore the posters suggesting you take short cuts with the size of ducting needed. Penny wise pound foolish, imho.
If you're referring to my post, I'm not suggesting OP cut corners on ducting size. I suggested he doesn't necessarily need a hood fan with a 10" duct, there are other relatively high powered hood fans that run with 6" and 8" ducts too (in fact, there are very few hoods that require 10" ducts).

As for the MUA requirement, I think I've been clear that I do believe it's good practice, but no necessarily required.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Sr. Member
Feb 26, 2019
606 posts
659 upvotes
Ottawa
Toukolou wrote: If you're referring to my post, I'm not suggesting OP cut corners on ducting size. I suggested he doesn't necessarily need a hood fan with a 10" duct, there are other relatively high powered hood fans that run with 6" and 8" ducts too (in fact, there are very few hoods that require 10" ducts).

As for the MUA requirement, I think I've been clear that I do believe it's good practice, but no necessarily required.
It sounded to me like that's what your were suggesting. You made a bunch of posts casting doubt on the need for MUA and 10" ducting. I advised OP to ignore them, and I stand by that advice.

OP should listen to the professionals working his job (not internet strangers) when specifying HVAC equipment. A large gas range can release a lot of air pollutants, it is a matter of health and safety. If he doesn't trust the pricing of the scope change: ask the contractor to justify it.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
7588 posts
3366 upvotes
dottawat wrote: It sounded to me like that's what your were suggesting. You made a bunch of posts casting doubt on the need for MUA and 10" ducting. I advised OP to ignore them, and I stand by that advice.

OP should listen to the professionals working his job (not internet strangers) when specifying HVAC equipment. A large gas range can release a lot of air pollutants, it is a matter of health and safety. If he doesn't trust the pricing of the scope change: ask the contractor to justify it.
Then you didn't read my posts clearly. I have mentioned several times that I believe installing MUA is ideal. What I questioned was the assertion it was part of the building code. Two different things.

As for 10" ducting, again, there are many fans that can move a lot of CFMs that don't require 10" ducts.

Finally, I too will stand by what I said about CFM requirements. They are based on every single burner, running full blast, with nothing (like a pot full of food absorbing the cooking heat) on them. An exceptionally unlikely scenario.

This is all, of course, just my opinion. That's the beautiful thing about RFD, we're all free to share our thoughts and opinions. It would be a rather dull place if we all saw eye to eye about everything.

In any event, I think I've shared all I have to share on this topic. Bon chance, OP.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Member
Mar 24, 2009
217 posts
172 upvotes
KW
topcheese wrote: Hi all

I’ll keep a long story short.

I am building a home. (Edit: I’m using a custom home builder to build a home for me)

I have a 36” gas stove.

I’m buying a 36” range hood that is more than 400 CFM.

The builder says that any range hood more than 400 CFM requires an air makeup system. That’s fair. It’s code. However they’re charging $2100 to install this (and there’s no way to avoid it unless I go with a 400 CFM hood)

Then, the range hood requires 10” venting. They’re charging $1100 for the rough in (vs standard 6” vents).

$3200 seems like an insane amount of money that likely costs them pennies. Especially since they’re starting bare bones.

Any thoughts on the matter? I was thinking of going with the builder grade system and ripping it out after I move. The concern is that I don’t want to damage tile/cabinets to change the vents from 6” to 10”, and I’m also worried about potential fitment issues.

Is it worth the hassle to save $1500?
You don’t want to move into a brand new home to renovate....
Newbie
Feb 3, 2021
29 posts
12 upvotes
York Region, Ontario
OP, we are building our new home (through a developer) and so i am sharing what I did for your reference.

Here’s what we did:

We bought
- 36in gas range
- 36in range hood

I paid 714+HST to upgrade to 8” duct from 6”. The hood is 1000cfm that requires 10” duct but I was told by the appliance manufacturer that it will be fine to use a 10”-to-8” reducer for installation. Also, I am aware of the MUA but it wasn’t to me as an option. I don’t expect to crank up the hood fan at full throttle unless I’m cooking a feast for 3-4 hours. In that case, I will have to crack open the window/door to the backyard.

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