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Determining lean to fat ratio in a burger blend

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Dec 11, 2007
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Markham

Determining lean to fat ratio in a burger blend

Hello, I’ve searched everywhere for an answer to this question but can’t find one...

If I use different cuts of beef in a single beef patty, how would I figure out what the final lean to fat ratio is of that blend?

For example, how does one determine what the final lean to fat ratio is in a burger blend containing 50% chuck and 50% brisket?
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Dec 23, 2015
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By volume or weight? Unless you are measuring quantities of 100% fat & meat I think you just need to guess ; unless you have a lab to analyze it.
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narmak wrote: Hello, I’ve searched everywhere for an answer to this question but can’t find one...

If I use different cuts of beef in a single beef patty, how would I figure out what the final lean to fat ratio is of that blend?

For example, how does one determine what the final lean to fat ratio is in a burger blend containing 50% chuck and 50% brisket?
Ground chuck: 80 to 85 percent lean/15 to 20 percent fat

What kind of brisket? Brisket flat is pretty much 90% lean.

Brisket point however looks like its 40% fat & connective tissue.

20% fat is best for burgers!
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Nov 15, 2008
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There is a good database online that includes the fat/protein content of various cuts called the USDA Nutrient Database.

https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/

There are a lot of commercial products that come up in the search results, so to get the core values from the USDA, search for "beef chuck raw," then select "SR Legacy Foods." They use the US grading system.

USDA Prime = Prime
USDA Choice = AAA
USDA Select = AA
USDA Standard = A

Find the cut & degree of trim you are working with. Then you can come up with a guesstimate.

If you want to see how your blend compares to some commercial products in Canada, I have a burger macros chart here: burger-composition-comparison-chart-macros-2466703/

The burger I wrote about there that I liked because it was so juicy has toasted wheat crumbs in it, hint, hint. You need something to soak up the fat & keep it from rendering away.
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lecale wrote: There is a good database online that includes the fat/protein content of various cuts called the USDA Nutrient Database.

https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/

There are a lot of commercial products that come up in the search results, so to get the core values from the USDA, search for "beef chuck raw," then select "SR Legacy Foods." They use the US grading system.

USDA Prime = Prime
USDA Choice = AAA
USDA Select = AA
USDA Standard = A

Find the cut & degree of trim you are working with. Then you can come up with a guesstimate.

If you want to see how your blend compares to some commercial products in Canada, I have a burger macros chart here: burger-composition-comparison-chart-macros-2466703/

The burger I wrote about there that I liked because it was so juicy has toasted wheat crumbs in it, hint, hint. You need something to soak up the fat & keep it from rendering away.

Yeah i learned that the semi hard way.
I used just pure ground beef. Flavour was there. The burgers were good
And juicy. But it shrank funny. The presentation would have been a bit nicer thats all!
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UrbanPoet wrote: Yeah i learned that the semi hard way.
I used just pure ground beef. Flavour was there. The burgers were good
And juicy. But it shrank funny. The presentation would have been a bit nicer thats all!
Toast some panko crumbs in a pan & that will fix you up next time. It helps with binding too. I like a bit of garlic & onion powder & the most minimal amount of salt because condiments are very salty. I think the problem with pre-made burgers is they generally put too many flavourings in them. Plain is good.
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lecale wrote: Plain is good.
Hallelujah, for burgers I only use med gr beef & S&P, no filler. I load up on condiments though.
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6060842 wrote: Hallelujah, for burgers I only use med gr beef & S&P, no filler. I load up on condiments though.
Oh yah!
Sometimes i go nuts.
The classic cheese, tomato, lettuce, ketchup, mustard, mayo… grilled onions.
But with bacon, a fried portobello mushroom, and sunny side up egg.

Its a messy monstrosity. But gooood… hehehe


I always have fried onions bc my new technique… is to sear each side super high heat until that crust forms. Maybe 45-60 seconds each side @ full blast.
Then i lay out a bunch of sliced onions like a big bed. I place the burgers on top of the bed of onions, bring the heat down to medium low… then finish off the burgers like that. In about 5 ish minutes the burgers are done. The onions end up frying in beef juice & fat. Lots of flavour. The moisture steam from the onions prevent the burger from burger (nice crust already formed). It cooks up faster and evenly this way because steam is a great conductor of heat!

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