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DIY Kids sprinkler - which PVC pipe to use ?

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[OP]
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Jun 21, 2003
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Stoney Creek, ON

DIY Kids sprinkler - which PVC pipe to use ?

Hey guys,
I'm looking to make something like this for my daughter to keep her cool and having a good time. It'll be far more exciting to her than our plain old sprinklers. Now my question is which pipe to use. I see 2 options for PVC at Home Hardware and understand what the differences are, but I guess I'm looking to see which strength of piple people think would be necessary for this idea.

Schedule 40 PVC

or

Irrigation pipe

Of course being less than 50% of the price I'd prefer to use the irrigation pipe. However I do want it to hold up and not look like garbage so do I need to the schedule 40?
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Sr. Member
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Jun 24, 2005
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Richmond Hill
That looks like a nice kiddie car wash!

Looking up the NSF PW written on the irrigation pipe indicates that its for potable water. However, if you hose is not rated for drinking, then there's no use for having a potable water type pipe.

Schedule 40 are used for lawn sprinkler systems.
[OP]
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Jun 21, 2003
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rngun wrote: That looks like a nice kiddie car wash!

Looking up the NSF PW written on the irrigation pipe indicates that its for potable water. However, if you hose is not rated for drinking, then there's no use for having a potable water type pipe.

Schedule 40 are used for lawn sprinkler systems.
I’m not concerned about the potable portion as I’m not concerned much about that. The potable irrigation pipe is less than half the cost so I was looking at it for that reason not because of the potable rating. Just wondering if that pipe would still be sufficient for this use or would it be too weak? I’m guessing the much lower cost is due to thinner side walls but as I have not really worked with either I’d love to know if the cheaper irrigation pipe would be stronger enough or not. I am planning to do an online shop to store order due to lack of inventory near me so I can’t just go in and test unfortunately.
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Jun 24, 2005
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Richmond Hill
Ic. It doesn't tell you what schedule the irrigation pipe is, so youight be right that it's thinner. If that's the case I would stick with schedule 40 pipe.

Comparing both pics, the irrigation pipe does look thinner.
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Dec 17, 2007
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Alliston, ON
The irrigation pipe is fine, it's sdr21 class 200, which means it's rated for 200psi. Your house is around 50psi. This is the same pipe that's used for irrigation systems on Golf courses everywhere that run between 120-150psi
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Oct 14, 2010
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Barrie ON
The irrigation pipe has a rating of 200 PSI, while the schedule 40 has a rating of 480 PSI, so either would work with regards to the water pressure coming out of your hose.

I think your area of concern is the ability of the pipe to remain rigid when building the frame. You don't want the 6' vertical pieces bending in the wind, and you don't want the horizontal pieces to sag, especially if you are hanging things on them.

I think you should use the thicker walled pipe (sched 40), to ensure the durability of your project (+$50 in overall cost).
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Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
I have a black plastic dock and my dock watering system is just irrigation pipe. Been going for 7 years now and its fine.
[OP]
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Jun 21, 2003
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Stoney Creek, ON
Rick007 wrote: The irrigation pipe has a rating of 200 PSI, while the schedule 40 has a rating of 480 PSI, so either would work with regards to the water pressure coming out of your hose.

I think your area of concern is the ability of the pipe to remain rigid when building the frame. You don't want the 6' vertical pieces bending in the wind, and you don't want the horizontal pieces to sag, especially if you are hanging things on them.

I think you should use the thicker walled pipe (sched 40), to ensure the durability of your project (+$50 in overall cost).
Thanks Rick. This is exactly what my concern was regarding. I do plan to do some sort of hanging stuff like pool noodles, etc from that guide so my concern was wether or not that would cause sags. I kind of assumed it would but again I’m not familiar with the irrigation pipe so just wanted some confirmation from someone else. Though it would be nice to save the money I think I will suck it up and go schedule 40.

Thanks everyone. When I get it done in a few weeks I’ll make sure to post some photos.
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Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
ChicoQuente wrote: Thanks Rick. This is exactly what my concern was regarding. I do plan to do some sort of hanging stuff like pool noodles, etc from that guide so my concern was wether or not that would cause sags. I kind of assumed it would but again I’m not familiar with the irrigation pipe so just wanted some confirmation from someone else. Though it would be nice to save the money I think I will suck it up and go schedule 40.

Thanks everyone. When I get it done in a few weeks I’ll make sure to post some photos.
Can schedule 40 be disassembled? Or does it require glue to hold the pressure? Putting it away in winter is an issue too
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Jerico wrote: Can schedule 40 be disassembled? Or does it require glue to hold the pressure? Putting it away in winter is an issue too
I haven’t completely determined my plan yet but I intend to make some modifications to take it apart in to smaller sections for winter storage.
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Dec 17, 2007
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Jerico wrote: Can schedule 40 be disassembled? Or does it require glue to hold the pressure? Putting it away in winter is an issue too
It requires primer/glue if using slip fittings. There are 1 step primer/glues in one bottle but they don't last over the years.
In the irrigation pipe, there are unions or threaded repair couplings you can use to make it removable
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I got around to making this the other day so I figured I’d share the photos. So far my daughter is uninterested in going through it when the water is on. Ha ha.

Also I did not make any modifications to take apart. The 2 sides aren’t THAT long so I’m just going to pull the 3 cross pieces in the fall and store the sides assembled against the wall in our shed. Won’t be an issue at all. I built and tested the sprinkler without gluing my joints, other than the piece with the ball valve and hose connection. It worked perfectly and held snug so I decided to leave it at that. At most I may end up gluing the sides together since I have no plans to disassemble them.
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Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
ChicoQuente wrote: I got around to making this the other day so I figured I’d share the photos. So far my daughter is uninterested in going through it when the water is on. Ha ha.

Also I did not make any modifications to take apart. The 2 sides aren’t THAT long so I’m just going to pull the 3 cross pieces in the fall and store the sides assembled against the wall in our shed. Won’t be an issue at all. I built and tested the sprinkler without gluing my joints, other than the piece with the ball valve and hose connection. It worked perfectly and held snug so I decided to leave it at that. At most I may end up gluing the sides together since I have no plans to disassemble them.
That is 6 feet bigger than I imagined. Nice job.

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