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DIY: PCShutters Home Renovation Projects

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[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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Toronto
Jon Lai wrote: I have the same sense of perfection, but to be honest, given the right craftsmanship, the glue joints should be noticeable only to yourself and anyone in the trades. From a practical standpoint, even if you don't do double up, you will still have joints somewhere on your countertop as Quartz panels usually come in 8ft lengths only, which means any L-shaped kitchen will have a joint in the corner. U-shaped kitchens will have (!) two joints.
I have thought about that and designed my kitchen accordingly. I will have absolutely no glue joint. I believe the maximum size you can get is 36"x126" I made mine peninsula 36x124.5"
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
47218 posts
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Richmond Hill
PCShutters wrote: I have thought about that and designed my kitchen accordingly. I will have absolutely no glue joint. I believe the maximum size you can get is 36"x126" I made mine peninsula 36x124.5"
It varies slightly with the brand as well. We went with Caesarstone and I was told their slab sizes are smaller than some of the other manufacturers; Chinese quartz tend to be bigger slabs but of course I stayed away from those :lol:
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Nov 17, 2012
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PCShutters wrote: I am going with the built in fridges so the depth is even less than counter depths but it should be fine because I am going with 48" wide fridge instead of the usual 36". I don't like the "standard" depth fridges because it will stick out way too much and I have a "gallery" style kitchen with not much room to spare.
I thought maybe built-in with the brace across the bottom of the cabinet at the floor, but thought perhaps that was just to keep it square during install.
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Nov 17, 2012
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PCShutters wrote: I have thought about that and designed my kitchen accordingly. I will have absolutely no glue joint. I believe the maximum size you can get is 36"x126" I made mine peninsula 36x124.5"
Did you confirm the allowance for cutting/edging the slab? I seem to recall Caesarstone needing a couple of inches between cuts / at the edge of the slab. They may not be able to give you 36" finished if the slab is actually 36" in size.

But many islands are of course much deeper than 36" so I'd be surprised if the max they can do is 36"
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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mickman wrote: There are a lot of well-reviewed brands. I believe Cesarstone, Cambria, Silestone, MSI, etc. We were willing to pay a bit of a premium to have one of the better brands, but still wanted a good bang for our buck.

We ended up with MSI in "Snow white" which looks completely white at a quick glance, but has specs/character when you look closely.

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Thanks mickman! You have given me a lot of think about. I didn't do any research on this topic because one of my neighbour owns a cabinet shop and I just leave it up to him. I just went with whatever he recommended.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 5, 2011
1022 posts
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Jon Lai wrote: It varies slightly with the brand as well. We went with Caesarstone and I was told their slab sizes are smaller than some of the other manufacturers; Chinese quartz tend to be bigger slabs but of course I stayed away from those :lol:
Good to know. Thanks Jon Lai. I guess I have a lot more homework to do.
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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torontotim wrote: I thought maybe built-in with the brace across the bottom of the cabinet at the floor, but thought perhaps that was just to keep it square during install.
Yes that brace/stretcher is just temporarily to make sure they stay square until I can get to the base cabinets.
torontotim wrote: Did you confirm the allowance for cutting/edging the slab? I seem to recall Caesarstone needing a couple of inches between cuts / at the edge of the slab. They may not be able to give you 36" finished if the slab is actually 36" in size.

But many islands are of course much deeper than 36" so I'd be surprised if the max they can do is 36"
Yes I did confirm with my kitchen guy before laying out my kitchen. My only criteria for him was to make sure it is one piece because I do not want any seams except for the waterfall at the edge of the peninsula.
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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Thanks everyone for your input regarding the countertop.

Quick update. Once I made up my mind on the thickness of the countertop. I went forward with the toe kick base. My toe kick bases are 4-3/4" tall because my lower cabinets will be 30"H leaving 1-1/4" for the countertop.

Here are the toe kick base installed. I made sure they are perfectly level because everything else will depend on how well I construct my toe kick bases.

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With the toe kick base installed perfectly level and plumb, I can simply place the cabinets on there and it require little to no adjustment and they all lined up. I left the bottom of the cabinet open because I want access to the toe kick later to secure the kick plate and if I ever need to run something down there, I could. It also given me an opportunity to use up my scrap wood. For the back of the cabinets, I used 5/8" construction grade plywood there because no one will see it once I put my drawers in.

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Now I can move onto the peninsula.
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Nov 17, 2012
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36" range?

Did you consider running natural gas/120v outlet in the range area for future use if you or a subsequent owner want a gas range?

Also for the fridge, are you running a water supply? When we gutted our kitchen I had a proper supply line plumbed in with a 1/4 turn shutoff valve recessed in the wall. Connected it to the fridge with a long braided stainless supply line. Forget all t hat flexible copper lines running from a line under the sink nonsense.

Not sure if the built-in fridges have ice makers etc. in them or not.
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
1022 posts
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Toronto
torontotim wrote: 36" range?

Did you consider running natural gas/120v outlet in the range area for future use if you or a subsequent owner want a gas range?

Also for the fridge, are you running a water supply? When we gutted our kitchen I had a proper supply line plumbed in with a 1/4 turn shutoff valve recessed in the wall. Connected it to the fridge with a long braided stainless supply line. Forget all t hat flexible copper lines running from a line under the sink nonsense.

Not sure if the built-in fridges have ice makers etc. in them or not.
My 36” stove/range is gas. I going to upgrade my hot water tank later this year. I will have that same person run a gas line up to my stove. While at it, I will have him upgrade my gas pipe to 1” or 1-1/4”

My fridge does have the ice maker so I will have to run a water line to the toe kick box right next to my fridge. I don’t want to put it in the wall because it is an outside wall and I don’t want to mess with the insulation and vapor barrier.

Also, the water to the fridge will come from my RO system under the sink.
Jr. Member
Sep 21, 2004
125 posts
79 upvotes
North Vancouver, BC
PCShutters wrote: My 36” stove/range is gas. I going to upgrade my hot water tank later this year. I will have that same person run a gas line up to my stove. While at it, I will have him upgrade my gas pipe to 1” or 1-1/4”

My fridge does have the ice maker so I will have to run a water line to the toe kick box right next to my fridge. I don’t want to put it in the wall because it is an outside wall and I don’t want to mess with the insulation and vapor barrier.

Also, the water to the fridge will come from my RO system under the sink.
I comment on your gas line. When I had went in for my permit a few years ago now - the inspector had asked me the very direct question as to why I wanted to upgrade my line to 1-1/4" line (as all the existing was just 1/2" so I showed him all my calculations as I was adding in a few fire places and dryer really far away from the main line (thinking how smart I was!) and he said without missing a beat - call Fortis and tell them to upgrade your pressure regulator. So I went that route (and thank god I did - cannot imagine tightening all the 1-1/4" lines with pipe wrenches instead of the 1/2" lines - let alone the costs!

In short - check with your gas company - explain that you are putting in services that demand more usage and the will come out and change out the meter regulator from a 1/4 PSI (7 WC) to 2 PSI (55 WC). They did this for free by the way - in the end I am buying more gas - so its paid off for them!
Then you can go as far as you want with that pressure! And it's still peanuts for pressure (2 psi is nothing considering tests are held at 15 PSI).
Then you just put in a pressure regulator outside (or inside if you have room) before each leg run to services. I think I paid 60 bucks per regulator that drops it to 1/4PSI for the equipment.
(https://mcsmeters.com/collections/gas-r ... ig-systems)
You could probably find them cheaper if your gas supplier is doing the work for you.
I have one for the dryer, one for the furnace/hot water heater, and one for the fireplaces and the future stove and BBQ if I go that route. No issues. Saved tons of money and time.
Images
  • Gas Line Iso For Permit .png
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 5, 2011
1022 posts
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Toronto
BouncyBall wrote: I comment on your gas line. When I had went in for my permit a few years ago now - the inspector had asked me the very direct question as to why I wanted to upgrade my line to 1-1/4" line (as all the existing was just 1/2" so I showed him all my calculations as I was adding in a few fire places and dryer really far away from the main line (thinking how smart I was!) and he said without missing a beat - call Fortis and tell them to upgrade your pressure regulator. So I went that route (and thank god I did - cannot imagine tightening all the 1-1/4" lines with pipe wrenches instead of the 1/2" lines - let alone the costs!

In short - check with your gas company - explain that you are putting in services that demand more usage and the will come out and change out the meter regulator from a 1/4 PSI (7 WC) to 2 PSI (55 WC). They did this for free by the way - in the end I am buying more gas - so its paid off for them!
Then you can go as far as you want with that pressure! And it's still peanuts for pressure (2 psi is nothing considering tests are held at 15 PSI).
Then you just put in a pressure regulator outside (or inside if you have room) before each leg run to services. I think I paid 60 bucks per regulator that drops it to 1/4PSI for the equipment.
(https://mcsmeters.com/collections/gas-r ... ig-systems)
You could probably find them cheaper if your gas supplier is doing the work for you.
I have one for the dryer, one for the furnace/hot water heater, and one for the fireplaces and the future stove and BBQ if I go that route. No issues. Saved tons of money and time.
Thank you so much for the info! I will look into it and ask my gas technician.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 5, 2011
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Toronto
I just finalized my countertop option. I am going with 3cm Caesarstone 9601. Thanks everyone for their inputs.

I am at the phase where I need to think about colour options for my cabinets. I don't think I want to go with the "traditional" one colour kitchen. I am going to have some fun and experiment with two tone kitchen. I am thinking of going with white for the upper cabinets and some darker exotic wood for the lower cabinets.

I spent hours at the lumber yard today trying to decide what kind of wood species to go with but still undecided. I have narrowed it down to: Walnut, Sapele, Genuine Mahogany and Padauk. What you guys think? any input would be greatly appreciated.

I bought a few samples home to compare it. The pictures really don't do it justice. These wood look so much better in real life.

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Sapele
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Padauk
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Genuine Mahogany
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Member
Jul 31, 2017
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Toronto
I built a changing table out of paduak. Seven years later i'm still finding that red dust everywhere. It's beautiful but an absolute PITA to mill. I don't think it will be a problem for you as you get through projects quickly, but i left one piece on top of another and after about 2 weeks, there was a noticable fading where the light exposure was different. It does change color over time I'd show pictures of it, but seven years later, it still isn't finished......Maybe it can be a changing table for his kids!
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Nov 9, 2011
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koffey wrote: Padauk is too red and not native which might cause issues. Similar to acacia/bamboo, etc.. I've seen some shit flooring with high pricing. Walnut would be my choice and I wouldn't use a flat/oil finish. It's a pain to keep clean when dust settles into it, looks nice tho. Semi would be my choice if it had to do it all over again which I won't.
I think the OP is looking to use it on the cabinet doors/trims rather than flooring. He already tiled his kitchen.
PCShutters wrote:
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Oct 6, 2010
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tonershop wrote: I think the OP is looking to use it on the cabinet doors/trims rather than flooring. He already tiled his kitchen.
OPPPS. And thanks for letting me know, lol, deleted
DYI difficulty scale:
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10-no joke
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May 23, 2009
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What flooring are you installing in the room next to the kitchen? Maybe a picture next to it will help decide the lower cabinet wood.

I think the Sapele will be my pick because it has more variations in the dark light shades in the wood grain...an appearance of more depth. I've always thought of it as a Mahogany substitute because I grew up around lots of Mahogany furniture, even the desk I used in grade school. Although the African Mahogany that I recall had more red undertones.
For the Padauk I personally wont consider it because it adds adds a lot of red in the room. It could be be tricky and a bit overpowering when it comes to furniture and home decor selection. Out of the three it stands out the most but sadly that is why I'll cross it off my list.
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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BoatyMcBoatface wrote: I built a changing table out of paduak. Seven years later i'm still finding that red dust everywhere. It's beautiful but an absolute PITA to mill. I don't think it will be a problem for you as you get through projects quickly, but i left one piece on top of another and after about 2 weeks, there was a noticable fading where the light exposure was different. It does change color over time I'd show pictures of it, but seven years later, it still isn't finished......Maybe it can be a changing table for his kids!
bubuski wrote: What flooring are you installing in the room next to the kitchen? Maybe a picture next to it will help decide the lower cabinet wood.

I think the Sapele will be my pick because it has more variations in the dark light shades in the wood grain...an appearance of more depth. I've always thought of it as a Mahogany substitute because I grew up around lots of Mahogany furniture, even the desk I used in grade school. Although the African Mahogany that I recall had more red undertones.
For the Padauk I personally wont consider it because it adds adds a lot of red in the room. It could be be tricky and a bit overpowering when it comes to furniture and home decor selection. Out of the three it stands out the most but sadly that is why I'll cross it off my list.
Thanks for your inputs. A lot of good points. I guess Padauk is out.

That leaves Sapele, Genuine Mahogany and Walnut. I personally like Sapele best but Walnut seems like a "safer" bet.

I will be using Brazilian Chestnut for the room next to the kitchen and it will have a HUGE 600lbs walnut slab dinning table as the focal point. I have installed that same flooring on my second floor.

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[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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Toronto
Quick update: almost finished building the peninsula carcass.

Like all of the other cabinets, I started with the toe kick base

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Place the carcass on the base

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Making the template for the plywood top that will later support the quart countertop

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Making the support for the farmhouse style sink and dry fit it

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Moved some of the appliances in its place to make sure they fit.

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Double up the back of the peninsula with another sheet of Sapele plywood. This cabinet back need to be super strong because I will be hanging swing-out seats here.

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Install the plywood top to help support the countertop. Also double as my workbench during this kitchen build.

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Don't forget your mandatory peninsular electrical outlets (two as far as I can determine based on apparent measurements.)
As someone long prepared for the occasion, in full command of every plan you wrecked---
Do not choose a coward's explanation, that hides behind the cause and the effect...

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