Home & Garden

DIY: Wainscotting [Post 689]

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 30th, 2020 4:28 pm
Deal Addict
Jun 27, 2015
1653 posts
212 upvotes
East York, ON
PCShutters wrote: Hell no. The saving is no where near enough to offset the investment I put into the tools but that was never the intent. I like shinny new tools--it brings me joy every time I use them so it is worth it to me.

You can certainly do what I do with more affordable tools where the tools will pay for itself like my other hobby. I have spent about 10K on my mechanic tools and I easily saved over 100K+ with all of the cars I have been maintaining since the early 2000s.
I have done that math myself too and came to the conclusion that if I put money in high end tools which I could afford it won't make sense
If you own and run a business in a different area then the time problem kicks in and you lose more time=money by renovating yourself than paying someone to do it
Unfortunately I do not own a business in the real sense and the things still add for me to do certain renos myself.
The main reason for doing it myself is because I do not trust contractors ...not sure what happened with my damn house but every thing I touch and try to fix seems to have been done cutting corners,, the only strategy involved was "grab the money and run, never come back"

I also like woodworking and I am dreaming to do some of the work you did but I do not have as much time as I would like to put in this.
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Member
Dec 27, 2017
309 posts
127 upvotes
Fantastic work!
I would like to learn more about the plastic tiles in your garage, though. :) They look great.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
eljay0 wrote: Fantastic work!
I would like to learn more about the plastic tiles in your garage, though. :) They look great.
@tonershop is correct. I used Gladiator garage floor tile. It’s a little expensive but it is by far one of the best investment I have put in my shop. It is so comfortable to walk on and I don’t have to worry about dropping my tools on the floor anymore.

The best part is, I can easily replace the damage tile without disturbing the other tiles around it so be sure to get a few extra tiles for future uses.

Another alternative would be

https://racedeck.com
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9166 posts
4698 upvotes
Paris
I did the drawer within a drawer as a retrofit in my junk builder kitchen. 100% awesome.
Member
Dec 27, 2017
309 posts
127 upvotes
PCShutters wrote: @tonershop is correct. I used Gladiator garage floor tile. It’s a little expensive but it is by far one of the best investment I have put in my shop. It is so comfortable to walk on and I don’t have to worry about dropping my tools on the floor anymore.

The best part is, I can easily replace the damage tile without disturbing the other tiles around it so be sure to get a few extra tiles for future uses.

Another alternative would be

https://racedeck.com
Thank you. I was looking at RaceDeck, which is pricey, then at Costco tile from Plasti-Loc and, finally, I'm holding off until I can do porcelain tiles.
Sorry, don't want to derail the excellent kitchen thread.

Cheers.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
eljay0 wrote: Thank you. I was looking at RaceDeck, which is pricey, then at Costco tile from Plasti-Loc and, finally, I'm holding off until I can do porcelain tiles.
Are you planning on putting porcelain tiles in your workshop? If so, that could be a little harsh on your back and tools if you drop them. Plus porcelain will break if you drop something hard enough on it and replacing it will not be easy.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
I am currently in between projects...The kitchen is pretty much done...just a few more small items I need to take care of.

I was at my favourite hardware store yesterday when I saw this nice looking dish draining rack and thought it would look good in my kitchen so I bought it. Installed it in one of my upper cabinet. The fit is almost perfect. It can hold so much plates. Each slot can hold up to 4 plates.

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Meanwhile, my brother & I decided to tackle one of the eyesore and underutilized area in his kitchen. The whole project took about 30 hours to do and it cost just under $500 in materials. Here is what we started with...

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Cleaned up the mess and take proper measurements

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With the measurements given to me, I sketch up the game plan with cut list.

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Then proceed to build it...

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Installed it in its final location

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Sneak peak at my next project...So excited! can't wait to finish it.

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Last edited by PCShutters on Aug 12th, 2020 11:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2017
1184 posts
1024 upvotes
@PCShutters Is the dish drying rack supposed to go in a cabinet that closes? How is the moisture escaping/evaporating if the door is closed?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 28, 2016
17623 posts
2223 upvotes
Out west
ProductGuy wrote: @PCShutters Is the dish drying rack supposed to go in a cabinet that closes? How is the moisture escaping/evaporating if the door is closed?
Im thinking he just uses it as a stand for dishes, not to actually dry dishes on. Like many homeowners, we find things for a certain use and use it for something completely different
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
ProductGuy wrote: @PCShutters Is the dish drying rack supposed to go in a cabinet that closes? How is the moisture escaping/evaporating if the door is closed?
It is meant for cupboard with no doors but I like it there because I have been looking for a storage solution for my plates. I have a separate dish drying rack next to the sink. Only dried plates goes back in there. I installed a similar rack for my cups and bowls to elevate it up a bit so that the cups/bowls are not resting directly on the wooden cabinet shelf. Plus, it's not like these cabinets are "air tight". Any remaining moisture can escape and evaporate.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
Insulate & Accessorize the "Mechanical Room"

My basement is unfinished and I don't know if I can ever find the time to finish it but this week I need to tackle the "Mechanical Room". As part of my kitchen build, I need to hook up the water line to the fridge and the sink but before I can hook it up, I need to install the water filter system for my house and this is what my brother and I did last weekend.

A few weeks ago, we kick-started the project with the tankless heater water system

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We started by pulling off all of the cheap builder insulation

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Installed the 2" foam board insulation on the wall directly onto the concrete wall with PL300. Taped all of the seams. I will go back later to fill in all of the gaps with foam spray from a can. Framed out the little window so I have some structure to strap all of the pipes and receptacles.

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Installed the water softener

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Installed the Reverse Osmosis System for our drinking water. One line will feed to the fridge and the other goes to the kitchen sink.

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While at it, I also replaced the dirty old sink.

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Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2019
168 posts
150 upvotes
That slab of walnut is absolutely beautiful! I have a slab that needs flattening before turning it into an office station and seeing your picture is giving me motivation to get it finished.

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