Home & Garden

DIY: Wainscotting [Post 689]

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 30th, 2020 4:28 pm
Sr. Member
Nov 9, 2011
949 posts
924 upvotes
Toronto
PCShutters wrote:
Installed the water softener

Image
I have been debating on whether or not to install a water softener. My water's hardness is 10 grains per gallon, which is greater than the 7 recommended by some. I am familiar with the pros and cons

Pros
  • Prevents build-up of minerals on the inside of pipes, fixtures, etc.
  • Lengthens the life of some appliances.
  • Reduces mineral spots on glassware.
  • Reduces soap films and detergent curds in sinks, bathtubs, and washing machines etc.
Cons
  • Potential health effects from additional sodium.
  • Impacts to the environment from use of salt.
  • Waste more water to regenerate the softener beads.


What are other GTA homeowner thoughts on this? Is it worth the money?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 29, 2001
3864 posts
725 upvotes
Newbury, ON
I was going to add foam board to my mechanical room also - but then I heard that the foam board is flammable when left open and exposed and should to be covered over by something like drywall.

But I did do my cold storage with it and used PL300 to stick the wall. spray foam became really messy so I switched to DAP Polyurethane which is rated for foam and concrete and forms a nice seal that can be finger moulded.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 6, 2002
5753 posts
5908 upvotes
Toronto
rilles wrote: I was going to add foam board to my mechanical room also - but then I heard that the foam board is flammable when left open and exposed and should to be covered over by something like drywall.
Yup he will have to clad that with fire rated covering (X-code wall board, backer board, etc) particularly between the HWH and the foam (I would just replace that part with Rockwool rigid board actually.)
A glass of wine with you, sir, and the ladies I'll enjoy.
Revolutionary times must on occasion make do with considerable abridgements in order to accentuate the political line more strongly.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
rilles wrote: I was going to add foam board to my mechanical room also - but then I heard that the foam board is flammable when left open and exposed and should to be covered over by something like drywall.

But I did do my cold storage with it and used PL300 to stick the wall. spray foam became really messy so I switched to DAP Polyurethane which is rated for foam and concrete and forms a nice seal that can be finger moulded.
hoob wrote:
Yup he will have to clad that with fire rated covering (X-code wall board, backer board, etc) particularly between the HWH and the foam (I would just replace that part with Rockwool rigid board actually.)
OMG I completely overlooked that. I was rushing to clean up the area so I could hook up the water softener I completely neglected that. Thank you! I will definitely look into Rockwood ComfortBoard.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
GTArenovate wrote: That slab of walnut is absolutely beautiful! I have a slab that needs flattening before turning it into an office station and seeing your picture is giving me motivation to get it finished.
Thank you. I love that slab too but that is now my problem. I was going to use it for the hall-tree project but now I think it would be wasteful to use it there. I need to find a new slab for my hall tree and save it for something more worthwhile.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
Built in Hall Tree

This project was supposed to be "small" project that I thought I could complete in 2 weekends but it turned out be a lot more time consuming than expected.

At the front of our house, as soon as you enter from the main door, there is this huge builder standard closet that takes up literally half of our foyer. It's bulky, ugly and hold very little clothing--very inefficient use of space. It was actually one of the first thing I tear down 3.5 years ago when I started this renovation journey.

Image

Ever since then, that space have been used to store lumbers for my upcoming projects.

Image

Image

There used to be a fairly large bunk head on top of the closet to hide the HVAC and plumbing. I ripped it out and made it smaller so that it will lined up with the hall tree--I want to hide this bunk head and make it look like it was part of the hall tree.

Image

Patch up the drywall

Image

Repaint the wall and ceiling

Image

Finally, I get to start on the hall tree. Like usual, I started with the base. Took my time to make sure it is nice and level because the entire structure depended on this being level and true.

Image

Once I have the base built. I made a cut list and start rough cut all of the pieces up and pre-finish the plywood.

Image

Once the wood is dried, I build the bottom cabinet. It will have two oversized drawers to hold the shoes and one small compartment on the right to hold a pair of boots.

Image

I bought this walnut slab about 3 years ago and let it air dry in other garage. I have always planned on using this slab for my hall tree but when I flatten it, I felt in love with it and decided to use it to build something else because most of the slab on the hall tree bench will be hidden--there is no point of wasting this beautiful walnut slab there.

Image

Because of that, I was delayed for another week. I have to go back and flatten another Butternut slab that I already air dried. It is not as pretty but it will do just fine here.

Image

Dry fit the slab on the bench.

Image

Image

Once I am happy with the fit, I sanded it--took me 4 hours just to sand this slab to 180 Grit. Then I finish it with epoxy pour because this bench will take a lot of beating.

Image

I sprinkle a bit of copper shaving in with the epoxy just for fun and visual interest.

Image

Image

While waiting for the wooden slab to dry (takes 7 days to completely cure). I proceed to the upper cabinet boxes. I edge band the plywood edges with white vinyl melamine because I will paint the upper cabinet white to match my kitchen.

Image

Drill the floating tenon slots--This is not for strength (but it doesn't hurt)--it is meant for alignment purposes.

Image

Drill the shelf pin holes and prepare them for final assembly.

Image

Installed the lower closet boxes

Image

Image

Image

And the the upper closet boxes

Image

Image

Obviously, we can not easily access the upper closet cabinet so I installed this pull down clothing rod. This clothing rod was designed to use with a coat hanger but I modified it for my purposes since my cabinets are not deep enough to use a traditional coat hangers. I bought this "kitchen hook" from ikea and mod it to work with my clothing rod.

Image

The iKea hook were mod and installed on my clothing rod

Image

In the upper closet cabinet, I made an access door on the top just incase I ever need access to the bunk head.

Image

Next steps:
  • Trim and scribe all of the edges for that build in look
  • Install crown moulding
  • Build the cabinet doors
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
44561 posts
5136 upvotes
Richmond Hill
I never thought of and have never seen the RO system installed in the basement before, and now that I've seen it, I can't imagine how it was not always done this way. Damn.
Artisan woodworker crafting live edge tables, end grain cutting boards, and other home decor
Silver Coins | Philips Wake-Up Light with Radio | Heatware
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
4532 posts
1067 upvotes
Dude, when do you find the time to actually work?!

Love your home projects btw, they're killer!
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 6, 2002
5753 posts
5908 upvotes
Toronto
Only one pair of boots? Do you even winter? I expect you to turn the upper section there (with power) into some sort of boot-drying contraption!
A glass of wine with you, sir, and the ladies I'll enjoy.
Revolutionary times must on occasion make do with considerable abridgements in order to accentuate the political line more strongly.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
Jon Lai wrote: I never thought of and have never seen the RO system installed in the basement before, and now that I've seen it, I can't imagine how it was not always done this way. Damn.
Thank you. When you have a small house, you have to think outside of the box.

It's amazing what you can come up with when you are forced into a corner and have to step out of your comfort zone.
Toukolou wrote: Dude, when do you find the time to actually work?!

Love your home projects btw, they're killer!
By spending a large chunk of my budget on sound dampening my workshop so that I could work late into the night without annoying my neighbours.
hoob wrote: Only one pair of boots? Do you even winter? I expect you to turn the upper section there (with power) into some sort of boot-drying contraption!
I wish! When you have limited space, there is just so much you can do. This hall tree was inspired by my high school locker. Each of my kids will have a "locker" where they can put their jackets, snow pants, lunch boxes and backpack. In theory, they will be assigned a "locker" where they are responsible to keep clean. The upper part of the hall tree will be for the guests and us to use. The shallow locker on the far right will have adjustable shelves for little knick knacks like lotion, sun screen, comb, keys, etc.

I will build a simple heated boot drying rack next to the hall tree to be used in the winter. This needs to be portable so I could put it in storage when not in use.
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2019
168 posts
150 upvotes
Can you please flatten my walnut slab, pretty please? lol

Excellent work as always. Great job!
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
GTArenovate wrote: Can you please flatten my walnut slab, pretty please? lol

Excellent work as always. Great job!
LOL I was hoping to find someone to flatten my next walnut slab! it is too big and heavy for me to "manhandle" it. My 13 quarters walnut slab is one of the kind! 4 feet by 9 feet long (this walnut tree was over 80ft tall). It weight just shy of 600lbs.
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2019
168 posts
150 upvotes
PCShutters wrote: LOL I was hoping to find someone to flatten my next walnut slab! it is too big and heavy for me to "manhandle" it. My 13 quarters walnut slab is one of the kind! 4 feet by 9 feet long (this walnut tree was over 80ft tall). It weight just shy of 600lbs.
That's massive. If you ever feel that it's too troublesome to do so yourself, you can give Paul (Canadian Wood Works) up in Orangeville a call. When I had him plane a few oddball pieces for me, he didn't hesitate to help.

Now if I could only get my 36"x84"x3" slab up there myself....
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
2944 posts
1939 upvotes
Toronto
I'm sure I might have asked this before, but where do you source your plywood? I need to make a sliding door (simple raw steel rail/hangers from 1925 Workbench in Toronto) and just want to do a simple thin slab of plywood with birch veneer. I may finish it clear, or may paint, not sure but want good furniture grade 3/4" plywood.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
636 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
GTArenovate wrote: That's massive. If you ever feel that it's too troublesome to do so yourself, you can give Paul (Canadian Wood Works) up in Orangeville a call. When I had him plane a few oddball pieces for me, he didn't hesitate to help.

Now if I could only get my 36"x84"x3" slab up there myself....
Haha. That is the million dollar question. I can't even lift it up to put it on workbench and you expect me to haul it all the way to Orangeville? I might as well flatten it myself. Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)