Home & Garden

DIY: Window Bench with Cushion & Storage [Post 640]

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  • Oct 28th, 2020 8:56 am
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
624 posts
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Toronto
Red_Army wrote: You would think someone who pays so much attention to detail would want to educate themselves on how to do things properly behind the walls as well as in front.

The AAV you used must be installed above the flood level rim of the fixture(s) it serves, Which would be the height of the counter). It also wouldn’t pass being installed in a closed cabinet.

Also your maximum fall to your vent connection must not exceed 1 pipe diameter so your right bowl sink as well as where you claim your tied into your “vent stack” would also not meet code.



You’re doing your own plumbing. You are pretending
I do try to educate myself whenever feasible but one can only learn so much in a lifetime. It would be next to impossible to "know everything"

Thanks again for your helpful tips. I will try to rectify the issues. As I said before, the AAV is only placed there (without glue) so I don't lose it. I do intend to move it as high as I can (just below the counter top). I know it wouldn't pass code but in term of being functional, I doubt I will have functioning issues because my cabinets are far from being "air tight". I used inset doors and leave 1/8" gap all around the door for air flow.

I am not sure if it makes any difference but my venting stack is 3" in diameter and it was put in by the builder. I only extended the pipe a little longer.

If attempting to renovate my own house is "pretending" then I guess I am but I never claim to be an expert in any of it. Most of what I do is brand new to me (this is my first time renovating a house). I have no background in any of the trade. I only have a little experience with woodworking. Nothing else. Even for woodworking, I am only intermediate at best (definitely not an expert).
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
44405 posts
4985 upvotes
Richmond Hill
PCShutters wrote: I used Red Mahogany Gel Stain from Minwax

I can never get the stain to come out evenly. The inserts are plywood so it take on stain differently.
That makes sense. I thought you had resawn the Ash to make the center panels. I can never get plywood to stain the same as hardwood.
Artisan woodworker crafting live edge tables, end grain cutting boards, and other home decor
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
624 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
Jon Lai wrote: That makes sense. I thought you had resawn the Ash to make the center panels. I can never get plywood to stain the same as hardwood.
I will resaw the wood for kitchen cabinets but not bathrooms. Way too much work and you still need to worry about wood expansion.
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Oct 15, 2007
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PCShutters wrote: I do try to educate myself whenever feasible but one can only learn so much in a lifetime. It would be next to impossible to "know everything"

Thanks again for your helpful tips. I will try to rectify the issues. As I said before, the AAV is only placed there (without glue) so I don't lose it. I do intend to move it as high as I can (just below the counter top). I know it wouldn't pass code but in term of being functional, I doubt I will have functioning issues because my cabinets are far from being "air tight". I used inset doors and leave 1/8" gap all around the door for air flow.

I am not sure if it makes any difference but my venting stack is 3" in diameter and it was put in by the builder. I only extended the pipe a little longer.

If attempting to renovate my own house is "pretending" then I guess I am but I never claim to be an expert in any of it. Most of what I do is brand new to me (this is my first time renovating a house). I have no background in any of the trade. I only have a little experience with woodworking. Nothing else. Even for woodworking, I am only intermediate at best (definitely not an expert).
Nobody expects you to know everything or be an expert. From what I’ve seen your woodworking is impeccable for an amateur, coming from someone who knows little about fine woodworking.

What I would expect is if you don’t know what you’re doing (which you admit yourself) that you would either a) learn how to do it properly and to code b). Consult with a professional on how to do it properly and to code c) hire a professional
At least that’s what I would do.
That vanity really is beautiful BTW
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
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Toronto
Those pull out shelves are pretty brilliant. Would be a great place for one of those press-to-open clicker mechanisms.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
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Is this outlet GFCI protected? I recall something about outlets lower than sinks, within 3 feet of a sink etc. etc...

No outlet above the vanity?

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torontotim wrote: Is this outlet GFCI protected? I recall something about outlets lower than sinks, within 3 feet of a sink etc. etc...

No outlet above the vanity?

Image
There are outlets to the side of each vanity.
The one below is most likely for a Bidet seat which would Require GFCI protection as well.(could be protected at the breaker)
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
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Nov 17, 2012
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Ahhh - didn't recognize those outlets as outlets!

I agree that chances are the entire bathroom is on a couple of dedicated GFCI breakers - just wasn't sure about this one's placement.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
624 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
torontotim wrote: Those pull out shelves are pretty brilliant. Would be a great place for one of those press-to-open clicker mechanisms.
Unfortunately those push-open mechanism only work on doors and not drawers. The only way you can get push open drawers that I know of are made by Blum, Grass and Salice and it is only available for under-mount slides. I have those installed in my window bench. It won't work for my pull out shelves because they are only rated for 100lbs. My current set up can handle 200lbs because I used 2 pairs of 100lbs. It is much more stable too.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
624 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
torontotim wrote: Is this outlet GFCI protected? I recall something about outlets lower than sinks, within 3 feet of a sink etc. etc...

No outlet above the vanity?

Image
All of my outlets in the washrooms are on GFCI circuit. I am using these outlet above the sink:

Image
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
624 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
Budget Built-in Computer Table with Plywood for Kids

Unlike my other built in projects, I did absolutely no planning for this desk. I just wink it through out the entire project to see where it would lead me. This computer/study desk was made entirely with plywood and I used 4 sheets of it plus a few cheap hardwares that I already have--the entire project cost me less than $300 to build.

Like usual, I started by building the cabinet carcass on each side of the desk to use as a table legs.

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I then fill in the spaces in between with under the table shelves for my kids to put their junks so that hopefully they can keep the table top clean. It also double as a foot rest.

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The angled shelves are little too confusing for me so I made a template of it to get all of the angles.

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Installed the last shelf and level all of the boxes to make sure my table top will be nice and flat.

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Time to make the table top: started by making the template with bunch thin strip of wood. This is how they used to measure for kitchen counter top before all of the fancy new laser stuff came along.

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Transferred the template to the plywood and just cut it close to the line and fine tune it with a sander. Test fit the table top.

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Laminate another layer of plywood to give it a bit more thickness and strength. Stained it and put in what seems like a million coats of oil based polyurethane.

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Meanwhile, I went and make drawers, doors, cove moulding, etc. I am sure you have seen it many times before so I will skip them all.

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Final reveal pictures

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Member
Feb 26, 2019
288 posts
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Ottawa
tonershop wrote:
I am thinking of doing this for my kitchen counter:
You're braver than me! I would never trust my artistic eye to create something like that. Cool technique, though.
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Sep 1, 2005
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Markham
PCShutters wrote:
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NIce custom build.

I would've have turned that right file "cabinet" leg so it opens in towards you. Not really accessible when you're doing homework.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
Red_Army wrote: From what I’ve seen your woodworking is impeccable for an amateur, coming from someone who knows little about fine woodworking.
Bro is no amateur woodworker with $40k of Festool in the background of the photos.

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