Home & Garden

DIY: Window Bench with Cushion & Storage [Post 640]

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  • Oct 23rd, 2020 2:03 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
611 posts
803 upvotes
Toronto
torontotim wrote: I'm sure I might have asked this before, but where do you source your plywood? I need to make a sliding door (simple raw steel rail/hangers from 1925 Workbench in Toronto) and just want to do a simple thin slab of plywood with birch veneer. I may finish it clear, or may paint, not sure but want good furniture grade 3/4" plywood.
Sounds like a cool project.

I usually get my plywood from Raf near the airport but I just bought his last skid of plywood last month. He told me he won't be able to get more plywood anytime soon due to the Covid19...

However, I found another guy on Kijiji selling what looks like the same plywood grade for similar price.

Edit: NVM. I just look him up on Kijiji myself. he is all sold out too.

If you only need one sheet--just get it from a lumber yard. They are more expensive but you are only getting one sheet so it's not that big of a deal. Also, plywood might not be the best material to use for doors. Plywood is not always flat--MDF & particle board might be the better option for doors.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
2855 posts
1859 upvotes
Toronto
PCShutters wrote: Sounds like a cool project.

I usually get my plywood from Raf near the airport but I just bought his last skid of plywood last month. He told me he won't be able to get more plywood anytime soon due to the Covid19...

However, I found another guy on Kijiji selling what looks like the same plywood grade for similar price.

Edit: NVM. I just look him up on Kijiji myself. he is all sold out too.

If you only need one sheet--just get it from a lumber yard. They are more expensive but you are only getting one sheet so it's not that big of a deal. Also, plywood might not be the best material to use for doors. Plywood is not always flat--MDF & particle board might be the better option for doors.
I was thinking about MDF as well, as yes, it of course needs to be flat. It's about 45" x 85" so plywood is likely not the best option. Just liked the idea of leaving the edges of the ply exposed and keeping it clear.

That being said, I haven't found the really nice 9 ply or whatever it is used in good cabinet building etc. at the big box stores. I'll take a fresh look - part of the problem is that it's for my cottage out in the sticks and perhaps they just don't stock the material out there. My truck is stuck in the US, so I'm dependent on small cars. Might have to sort my trailer out and just tow the wood from Toronto behind the Fiat ;)
Jr. Member
Feb 5, 2019
159 posts
143 upvotes
torontotim wrote: I was thinking about MDF as well, as yes, it of course needs to be flat. It's about 45" x 85" so plywood is likely not the best option. Just liked the idea of leaving the edges of the ply exposed and keeping it clear.

That being said, I haven't found the really nice 9 ply or whatever it is used in good cabinet building etc. at the big box stores. I'll take a fresh look - part of the problem is that it's for my cottage out in the sticks and perhaps they just don't stock the material out there. My truck is stuck in the US, so I'm dependent on small cars. Might have to sort my trailer out and just tow the wood from Toronto behind the Fiat ;)
You would need to get them from a lumber mill. Try Century Mill (Stouffville) or Central Fairbanks (Concord).
Member
Dec 27, 2017
309 posts
126 upvotes
Beautiful job on that hall closet! The bench looks amazing.

May I ask a dumb question here?
Is it difficult to switch kitchen cabinet door/drawer hardware from handles to minimalist pulls? I found similar pictures of what we're hoping for.
To go from this:
kitchen_cabinet_handles_current.JPG
to this:
kitchen_cabinet_handles.JPG
Our finish is semi-gloss soft white and the kitchen is 5-years old. Would it be possible to fill and paint over the old hardware holes or does this typically require a full refinish to blend in the fill/repair? I guess the upper cabinets will need new extended doors and sides to hide the existing apron on the bottom as I'm not sure how it would look with the apron visible.

Thanks!
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
611 posts
803 upvotes
Toronto
torontotim wrote: I was thinking about MDF as well, as yes, it of course needs to be flat. It's about 45" x 85" so plywood is likely not the best option. Just liked the idea of leaving the edges of the ply exposed and keeping it clear.

That being said, I haven't found the really nice 9 ply or whatever it is used in good cabinet building etc. at the big box stores. I'll take a fresh look - part of the problem is that it's for my cottage out in the sticks and perhaps they just don't stock the material out there. My truck is stuck in the US, so I'm dependent on small cars. Might have to sort my trailer out and just tow the wood from Toronto behind the Fiat ;)
If you are into that exposed plywood edges, go with baltic birch. It has a lot more plys. A typical 18mm plywood will have 13 ply vs 7 to 9 ply. But for a door, I would go with at least 24mm thick plywood. I would not build a door out of plywood but if I ever do, I would double up the 18mm to get 36mm plywood because most interior doors are 1-3/8" thick.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
611 posts
803 upvotes
Toronto
eljay0 wrote: Beautiful job on that hall closet! The bench looks amazing.

May I ask a dumb question here?
Is it difficult to switch kitchen cabinet door/drawer hardware from handles to minimalist pulls? I found similar pictures of what we're hoping for.
To go from this:
kitchen_cabinet_handles_current.JPG
to this:
kitchen_cabinet_handles.JPG

Our finish is semi-gloss soft white and the kitchen is 5-years old. Would it be possible to fill and paint over the old hardware holes or does this typically require a full refinish to blend in the fill/repair? I guess the upper cabinets will need new extended doors and sides to hide the existing apron on the bottom as I'm not sure how it would look with the apron visible.

Thanks!
You have a beautiful modern kitchen. I would not bother with that "minimalist" door pull. It will get dated in no time but that is just my opinion. I had those handle before, it's catches and hold onto the dust and grease unless you clean them fairly often.

To answer your question, to do it properly, you would have to take all of the doors off. Fill in the holes and repaint the entire doors to blend in the patch work. Also, the minimalist handle you are looking at will require that you cut a shallow dado to recess the handles--a lot of work for an amateur. The pro can knock that out in no time with proper tools and template.

You don't have to extend the doors. Just extend the apron further out so that it is flush with the doors. This way, you have inset doors instead of overlaying doors.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
8949 posts
4564 upvotes
Paris
PCShutters wrote:
I will build a simple heated boot drying rack next to the hall tree to be used in the winter. This needs to be portable so I could put it in storage when not in use.
I built a box over a register by my front door and put in 3/4 Schedule 10 pipe that I drilled uniform holes in. I then capped each pipe, and make them able to slide up and down using unions I spindle sanded out so only those in use would blow more air. I cut a plastic register in half and sealed it off so all air flow goes through my holes. Its in the useless space right behind my active door, and is built to be the exact right size so the door can open fully, and its even cut to fit perfectly around the door casing. I think it has 9 spots and it works like a charm as that register is one of the closest to the furnace and we generally kept it low flow or off before I built that thing.

Heat comes on in the am so on the way out the door for school kids have warm boots. I built it out of scrap and just needed the pipe fittings. Painted white, and now a useless space has some use.

Edit: Its based on this link only I just used the furnace fan which runs quite a bit in the day anyways.
https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/h ... ncubooter/
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 28, 2016
17099 posts
2150 upvotes
Out west
tonershop wrote: To mount OTR microwave "to the correct height", the shortest person in your household would need to be at least 7 ft tall. The stove is 36" tall plus 30" clearance for gas stove. So the base of the OTR microwave would have to be mounted at 66 inch or 5.5 ft. Factoring in a few inches for the microwave base. You are looking at 70 inch. You should never be reaching for hot food from above your head. So your shoulder would have to be at the same level as your microwave; hence you would need to be at least 7 ft tall. Canadian average height is 5 ft 9" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Average_h ... by_country).

Personally, I would rather that hot soup is spilled below me rather than on me.
Just want to confirm, you may want to contact the builder of this new Ronald McDonald house and tell them how its wrong to have an OTR microwave. I doubt many people are 7 feet tall that use this place
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Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 18, 2005
20018 posts
2830 upvotes
Niagara Falls
WikkiWikki wrote: Just want to confirm, you may want to contact the builder of this new Ronald McDonald house and tell them how its wrong to have an OTR microwave. I doubt many people are 7 feet tall that use this place
Those aren't gas ranges so I'd assume they don't require the amount of clearance above the stove. Looking at the kettle in that picture, the microwave certainly isn't 2.5 feet above it.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
611 posts
803 upvotes
Toronto
Evil Baby wrote: Those aren't gas ranges so I'd assume they don't require the amount of clearance above the stove. Looking at the kettle in that picture, the microwave certainly isn't 2.5 feet above it.
I can’t believe we are back to this again......sigh


@Evil Baby is correct. That looks like standard 18” height to me.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
611 posts
803 upvotes
Toronto
Jerico wrote: I built a box over a register by my front door and put in 3/4 Schedule 10 pipe that I drilled uniform holes in. I then capped each pipe, and make them able to slide up and down using unions I spindle sanded out so only those in use would blow more air. I cut a plastic register in half and sealed it off so all air flow goes through my holes. Its in the useless space right behind my active door, and is built to be the exact right size so the door can open fully, and its even cut to fit perfectly around the door casing. I think it has 9 spots and it works like a charm as that register is one of the closest to the furnace and we generally kept it low flow or off before I built that thing.

Heat comes on in the am so on the way out the door for school kids have warm boots. I built it out of scrap and just needed the pipe fittings. Painted white, and now a useless space has some use.

Edit: Its based on this link only I just used the furnace fan which runs quite a bit in the day anyways.
https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/h ... ncubooter/
That sounds like an awesome idea! Thank you.

I will look into it more this winter when we finally move back in.
Sr. Member
Nov 9, 2011
912 posts
809 upvotes
Toronto
WikkiWikki wrote: Just want to confirm, you may want to contact the builder of this new Ronald McDonald house and tell them how its wrong to have an OTR microwave. I doubt many people are 7 feet tall that use this place
Cool story bro... :rolleyes:
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
8949 posts
4564 upvotes
Paris
PCShutters wrote: That sounds like an awesome idea! Thank you.

I will look into it more this winter when we finally move back in.
It’s almost as good as the cottage wood stove for drying gloves, boots and hats.
Member
Dec 27, 2017
309 posts
126 upvotes
PCShutters wrote: You have a beautiful modern kitchen. I would not bother with that "minimalist" door pull. It will get dated in no time but that is just my opinion. I had those handle before, it's catches and hold onto the dust and grease unless you clean them fairly often.

To answer your question, to do it properly, you would have to take all of the doors off. Fill in the holes and repaint the entire doors to blend in the patch work. Also, the minimalist handle you are looking at will require that you cut a shallow dado to recess the handles--a lot of work for an amateur. The pro can knock that out in no time with proper tools and template.

You don't have to extend the doors. Just extend the apron further out so that it is flush with the doors. This way, you have inset doors instead of overlaying doors.
Thank you!
Neither of those pictures are of our kitchen, but yes, we have something similar. It's pretty modern, but the wife would like it even more minimalist and she keeps regretting for not thinking through this more when we designed the house initially. Cleaning-wise, I hear what you are saying, but we are a neat-freak household and you could easily call the house "staged" any day of the week. haha My wife would be proud of that statement. ;)
Member
Feb 11, 2009
239 posts
64 upvotes
@PCShutters

Amazing tree hall. Could you let me know what are the dimension boxes you used for both the lower cabinets and upper cabinets?

I also have builder closet that was built in my hall with the sliding mirror doors that ill be looking to replace.

Thanks!

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