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DIY: Window Bench with Cushion & Storage [Post 640]

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 28th, 2020 8:56 am
[OP]
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Sep 5, 2011
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Toronto
Jon Lai wrote: Do they charge in BF? I assume that's about $10BF for the slab?
They were charging by the slabs...no idea how they came up with the price.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
DIY Classical Craftsman Style Trim from Scratch

I have a thing for classic traditional timeless trim-work but never have the time or excuse to do it until now. You can go out and buy all of the trims you need and install it but where is the fun in that?

I am finally at the stage where I can remove the old parquet floor and put in the new floor. Here is all of the old floor removed and a fresh layer of plywood were installed.

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I started with this window in our family room

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Removed the old worn-out shutters and cleaned up the window

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Removed the old window stool

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Installed the new window stool

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Milled up about 200 bdft of poplar for this project

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I found these dimensions from Windsor one and use it as a guide line for my milling.

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Start making the components from the bottom up. Starting with the plinth block. It is just a simple block of wood that is 1-3/8” thick, 8” tall and 4-1/2” wide. Roundover the top with a 3/8” bit.

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Next is the stile. This component took the longest to make because there are a few steps involved. Started with the three flutes. I used my homemade router plate with guides on both sides to make sure they don’t venture off. The router bit I used here is the 1/2” cove bit.

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I chamfered the two sides with a chamfer bit. I made sure to start/stop the routing 7 inches from the top & bottom.

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Finally, I routed a relief groove at the bottom with the biggest straight bit I could find.

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Seven hours of sanding (mostly by hand because of the groove and chamfer) later

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Next is the header. The header consists of the header stop, header-frieze, header cap, and my personal touch the header dentil trim. The header stop and header-freze are just a simple piece of 7/16x1-1/16 and 3/4x4-1/2”. The header cap was made with 1-1/4x2-1/4” stock, routed a simple design on the edge to dress it up a bit.

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All of the pieces on the header gets a return like this so that you won’t see any end grain

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With all of my components ready to go. I started by assembling the header.

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Add the header cap

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Add the dentil trim with cove bottom. I made these trims last year for my other door.

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Installed the two stiles and mount it onto the window

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The windows will also get the window aprons. The aprons are just a piece of 3/4” stock with a cove moulding wrapping around the top.

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Finally, here is the window all trimmed out

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The patio door…

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A few coats of paint later

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Last edited by PCShutters on Sep 28th, 2020 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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man, that's a lot of work....

how long have you been in the woodworking trade?

not sure if anyone already asked.
DYI difficulty scale:
0-joke
10-no joke

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
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Toronto
koffey wrote: man, that's a lot of work....

how long have you been in the woodworking trade?

not sure if anyone already asked.
I am not in the woodworking trade. Just a hobbyist. I have been a weekend hobbyist since 2005...I am not even that into woodworking. I am more of a “jack of all trade—master of none”
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PCShutters wrote: I am not in the woodworking trade. Just a hobbyist. I have been a weekend hobbyist since 2005...I am not even that into woodworking. I am more of a “jack of all trade—master of none”
Shocking how good and cheap trim can be made if you have a router table and a way of flattening rough cut (ideally jointer/planer and table saw). I was going to buy a piece for a customer in Pine but made it myself for $10 when I saw it was $100 at a trim store.
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Nov 23, 2011
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Wow, that is a ton of work.

As always, my hat goes off to you, good sir. Very well done.
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PCShutters wrote: I am not in the woodworking trade. Just a hobbyist. I have been a weekend hobbyist since 2005...I am not even that into woodworking. I am more of a “jack of all trade—master of none”
well played sir. you have a fine assortment of tools. hobbies are expensive but awesome. you have a well honed craft and it shows.
DYI difficulty scale:
0-joke
10-no joke

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
Jerico wrote: Shocking how good and cheap trim can be made if you have a router table and a way of flattening rough cut (ideally jointer/planer and table saw). I was going to buy a piece for a customer in Pine but made it myself for $10 when I saw it was $100 at a trim store.
Yes it is cheap and easy to make your own trim if you only have a few pieces to do. To outfit a whole house, it takes wayyyy too long. I am no where near done with my finish carpentry work but I already used about 1,000 bdft of poplar thus far. I will need roughly another 600 to 800 bdft more to trim out my main floor. So much sanding and so far it cost more to make it than just to buy it (I am not even counting my time). The only upside to this is that I can say I made it myself and I used premium grade poplar.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
koffey wrote: well played sir. you have a fine assortment of tools. hobbies are expensive but awesome. you have a well honed craft and it shows.
Thank you. I have been a collector for most of my life. Started with stamps when I was a toddler. Went on to coins until my mid 20s and I switched to tools ever since. Have been collecting tools since 2005! Fortunately for me, I get to use my parents garage as my second shop (my 3rd shop is in the basement)
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Jan 14, 2007
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If this isn't your job how the heck do you find the time to do all this? Between my job and family obligations I have barely enough time to watch a basketball game a couple of nights a week!
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
The_Professor wrote: If this isn't your job how the heck do you find the time to do all this? Between my job and family obligations I have barely enough time to watch a basketball game a couple of nights a week!
Easy! Sleep less. I have 60 hours work week: Monday to Saturday (not including travel). The only way I can get any work done is to stay up late and get up early. Most days, I only get 4 hours of sleep.
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Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
PCShutters wrote: Yes it is cheap and easy to make your own trim if you only have a few pieces to do. To outfit a whole house, it takes wayyyy too long. I am no where near done with my finish carpentry work but I already used about 1,000 bdft of poplar thus far. I will need roughly another 600 to 800 bdft more to trim out my main floor. So much sanding and so far it cost more to make it than just to buy it (I am not even counting my time). The only upside to this is that I can say I made it myself and I used premium grade poplar.
Without a doubt there is a buy/make calculation that must be done. I did a lot of pine at our cottage as the profile we wanted was unavailable, but if our trim guy had it there would have been no way I was making all that.

My old boss when I worked at a tool company once told me you aren’t going to save money making it yourself, but you will get exactly what you wanted.
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Sep 12, 2006
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router-jig.jpg


That's a neat router jig.
Did you make that yourself?
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
Jerico wrote: Without a doubt there is a buy/make calculation that must be done. I did a lot of pine at our cottage as the profile we wanted was unavailable, but if our trim guy had it there would have been no way I was making all that.

My old boss when I worked at a tool company once told me you aren’t going to save money making it yourself, but you will get exactly what you wanted.
That is exactly why I wanted to make my own trim. It is either not available or too inconvenient for me to go to pick it up.

At least I get to pick the wood I want to use for each trim. For the corner trim where I know it will get a lot of ding and dent, I used hard maple. For curves, I used air dried ash and/or pvc. The rest was done with poplar.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 5, 2011
625 posts
817 upvotes
Toronto
montyhall wrote: router-jig.jpg



That's a neat router jig.
Did you make that yourself?
Yup. I made that with a scrap piece of acrylic sheet I had. Ideally, I would like to use a 1/2” thick clear acrylic.

Many youtubers have tutorials on how to make this simple jig. My favorite is this guy

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