Parenting & Family

Do you see any negative mental impact to your kids due to lockdown?

[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
11810 posts
6870 upvotes
Markham

Do you see any negative mental impact to your kids due to lockdown?

Since my son started staying at home and couldn't play with his friends, I feel he is getting more and more impatient. He still has online class and homework, but just feel he has high temper now. Not sure this is due to lockdown or just growing pain
15 replies
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
37042 posts
23014 upvotes
Center of Universe
Yes, my kids are displaying signs of anxiety.
We've since started to allow them to play with the neighbor's kids on our street, as we also know the parents.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
2433 posts
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NOT centre of Univer…
It makes sense that there will be impacts on kids (and adults) being locked at home. Of course there will be impacts. If you are talking about an actually high temperature, I don’t think that is from being lock down (unless he has the virus). If you talking about being irritable, that’s a possibility.

The impacts will really vary from kid to kid and family to family. My kid was having a lot challenges wth mental and physical health prior the COVID. She had a major sports head injury at the beginning of this year and was on a slow recovery. She was missing a ton of school. The cancellation of school has giving her the space to work on her physical health. She was finally able to almost fully recover because she doesn’t have the outside triggers which has helped both mentally and physically. So that was great as the specialist were concerned of permanent damaged.

Now, my kids are just dealing with what the other families are going through, being away from friends, routine, School. They sometimes complain about being bored or missing their friends, especially when other parents are allowing group gatherings. They are ‘off’ but they are okay.

I think kids may be ‘off’ but these are off times. It’s important as a parent to help them explore and understand their feelings and know it’s okay to be off. Don’t ignore it, help understand it,/75 also know it’s okay that the kids are off. We have been getting some online counselling just to make sure it’s nothing else so the kids have another channel to explore what they are feeling.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3586 posts
1345 upvotes
Woodbridge
I've noticed it from my students. Some have reported feelings of anxiety and restlessness. Parents have reached out as well and let me know that things just seem "off." Rhythms are off. I've also noticed more and more of my students submitting work and sending me messages late at night... between 10pm and 3am and there's very little activity before noon so the routine and sleep schedule is definitely off.

Here are some resources that might help...

Sick Kids - https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/covid-19
Children's Mental Health Ontario - https://cmho.org/covid19/
CAMH (adult resources, included self-assessments for stress and anxiety) - https://www.camh.ca/en/health-info/ment ... nd-anxiety
Moderator
May 28, 2012
11695 posts
4236 upvotes
Saskatoon
OntEdTchr wrote: I've noticed it from my students. Some have reported feelings of anxiety and restlessness. Parents have reached out as well and let me know that things just seem "off." Rhythms are off. I've also noticed more and more of my students submitting work and sending me messages late at night... between 10pm and 3am and there's very little activity before noon so the routine and sleep schedule is definitely off.
I wondered if school was still happening. Mine are adults now, so I'm not in the loop as to what's happening to children in grade/high school. Are students given assignments and a certain amount of time to submit them? Is it like cyberschool? What about children who don't have access to a computer or other means of communication?
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3586 posts
1345 upvotes
Woodbridge
Mars2012 wrote: I wondered if school was still happening. Mine are adults now, so I'm not in the loop as to what's happening to children in grade/high school. Are students given assignments and a certain amount of time to submit them? Is it like cyberschool? What about children who don't have access to a computer or other means of communication?
It's kind of all over the place and differs from province to province. I can only speak to Ontario, but my understanding is that our Ministry of Education used Alberta as a model. Students in K-6 receive 5 hours of weekly activities. Students in Grades 7 and 8 receive 10 hours. Students in high school receive three hours per full course. The activities are mostly asynchronous, which means the teacher will post some lessons/videos/worksheets/activities and the students work on them and submit them. Some activities are synchronous, e.g. live chats using Google Meet, Zoom, Microsoft Teams etc. Different school boards are doing different things with respect to subjects. The Ministry has said that the focus should be on literacy, math, science and social studies; however, my board has directed us to provide material for all subjects proportional to the time spent during the 1500 minute school week (e.g., students receive 100 minutes of music instruction, so 1/15th of the 5 hours in K-6 or 1/15th of the 10 hours in 7/8 should be music).

In terms of report card marks, we are only evaluating and reporting on material that was covered from the start of Term 2 (late-Jan/early-Feb) to March 13th (the last day of school before the closure). If there are students that demonstrated growth during the school closure period, that growth may be used to improve a mark/grade based on the teacher's professional judgement. Marks/grades cannot go down.

With respect to how the week is structured, different teachers have different systems. I teach two groups of students - a regular math class and a special education class for students with learning disabilities, ADHD and/or high-functioning autism. For the regular math class, I post the week's lessons/assignments on Sunday afternoon and make it due the following Saturday evening. Those kids have the executive functioning and organization skills to be able to manage their own timetables and do the work. For my special education kids, I have daily live lessons/check-ins that they may attend. I record and post them for those that can't. Some of the kids receive a weekly schedule with specific tasks on each day of the week whereas others receive work for the entire week and it's due at the end of the week. It depends on their specific level of ability. But again, this is different for all teachers. Some of my colleagues send everything out at the start of the week and some will schedule posts each day with the material due at the end of the day. There are benefits and drawbacks to both systems and I have heard from parents and students with preferences on both sides.

My board has given out something like 15,000 laptops and a few thousand prepaid Rogers internet dongles to families that required it. School boards across the province have provided access to tech for families that didn't have it at home. Engagement is probably all over the place depending on the area. I've had about 80% completion across the board of assignments that I've posted. All students have done something, most have done everything, and some have missed a few tasks here and there. I teach in a high-SES area and my students and their families are quite academically motivated, so I would expect that I'm on the higher end of student engagement. I would also guess that high school teachers are having a tougher time.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
11810 posts
6870 upvotes
Markham
Mars2012 wrote: I wondered if school was still happening. Mine are adults now, so I'm not in the loop as to what's happening to children in grade/high school. Are students given assignments and a certain amount of time to submit them? Is it like cyberschool? What about children who don't have access to a computer or other means of communication?
In my cases, i don't really worry academic stuff because it's easy finding private tutors or classes.

It's more about social part. Technically we are still in social distancing so he can't play with his friends.

Although we play with him after work such as riding, but again, we don't necessarily have same interest and he is lack of kids level socialization. This is the biggest problem

And in current situation, i am not going to send him to summer camp even if there is one
Deal Fanatic
Sep 21, 2004
8569 posts
1388 upvotes
We have adjusted well but I know we're in the minority. We have 3 kids at home so they all play together. Our eldest occasionally mentions missing friends when he's reminded (school video calls) but it's generally not on his mind.

I've been an RFD hoarder for over a decade so the kids have an over abundance of stuff to play or work on or learn. Our medium size suburban yard is large enough for them to run around and burn off energy.

We have functionally been an atypical family and it's worked out our way of life is social distancing compatible. Ie. We've always homeschooled on top of public school material so sitting down to teach our kids math is nothing new for parents or kids.

We've actually had positive results over this time period. Our eldest is no longer copying/learning bad behaviour from some troublemakers at school. We've also been able to address and tackle some behavioural issues that had been brewing.

But as mentioned, our situation is unique. I'm currently the only working parent and I have a flexible work schedule. Both of us have been able to commit to learning, playing, etc with the kids all day,every day. We haven't had to juggle that.

I see how it can be difficult/hard under general circumstances trying to make things work between work/kids or the stress with income/job situation.

Our 1 neighbour has 1 kid and its been really tough on them. They've recently caved in and gone the east coast route and "bubbled" with another family.
Deal Guru
Oct 7, 2010
12162 posts
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Anxiety. Nervous breakdown. Self harm?Maybe Sucidal thought?
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
11810 posts
6870 upvotes
Markham
Stock R wrote: We have adjusted well but I know we're in the minority. We have 3 kids at home so they all play together. Our eldest occasionally mentions missing friends when he's reminded (school video calls) but it's generally not on his mind.

I've been an RFD hoarder for over a decade so the kids have an over abundance of stuff to play or work on or learn. Our medium size suburban yard is large enough for them to run around and burn off energy.

We have functionally been an atypical family and it's worked out our way of life is social distancing compatible. Ie. We've always homeschooled on top of public school material so sitting down to teach our kids math is nothing new for parents or kids.

We've actually had positive results over this time period. Our eldest is no longer copying/learning bad behaviour from some troublemakers at school. We've also been able to address and tackle some behavioural issues that had been brewing.

But as mentioned, our situation is unique. I'm currently the only working parent and I have a flexible work schedule. Both of us have been able to commit to learning, playing, etc with the kids all day,every day. We haven't had to juggle that.

I see how it can be difficult/hard under general circumstances trying to make things work between work/kids or the stress with income/job situation.

Our 1 neighbour has 1 kid and its been really tough on them. They've recently caved in and gone the east coast route and "bubbled" with another family.
This situation really tells me one thing for sure: if you want kids, minimum 2 !
Banned
Feb 7, 2005
4498 posts
1186 upvotes
I bet suicide numbers are very high . Drug abuse is on the rise . All from people not being able to cope with the lock down . I imagine any kids with anxiety with have more . I feel sorry for teachers in the fall . Having to deal with kids after the lock down .
<sig removed> by moderators . Yet no moderator told me they removed or why ?
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
11810 posts
6870 upvotes
Markham
pfbmgd wrote: I bet suicide numbers are very high . Drug abuse is on the rise . All from people not being able to cope with the lock down . I imagine any kids with anxiety with have more . I feel sorry for teachers in the fall . Having to deal with kids after the lock down .
They should have more classes on how to deal with anxiety and other negative emotions
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
2433 posts
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smartie wrote: This situation really tells me one thing for sure: if you want kids, minimum 2 !
Definitely more than one. Both my kids have said they are most grateful that they have a sibling during these times. They have definitely been a support to each other and balances it that one child doesn't get too much attention (getting yelled at). They have said they have become so much closer. Our friends with one child are struggling more. They are finding just adult-child relationship can be draining. Though, the families that I know that have 5 or more kids at home are also getting on each others nerves. The happy spot seems to be 2-4 kids. Though pandemic is not a good enough reason to determine the number of kids you have.
pfbmgd wrote: I bet suicide numbers are very high . Drug abuse is on the rise . All from people not being able to cope with the lock down . I imagine any kids with anxiety with have more . I feel sorry for teachers in the fall . Having to deal with kids after the lock down .
I think it depends on what the anxiety triggers are. If the triggers are more social or school performance related, the anxiety is going down. General anxiety seems to be going up though. My kids anxiety is triggered because she is a high performing perfectionist, and worries about school. With schools saying that the marks are pretty much in, she is much calmer. With teenagers, the social anxiety triggered by bullying is gone.

The effects will definitely vary. I am so thankful for our school as the teachers call and check on my kids mental health.
smartie wrote: They should have more classes on how to deal with anxiety and other negative emotions
Schools can only do so much. Trying to figure out triggers and thoughts is so nuanced that general classes can help, but if there is truly a problem, teachers are not equipt to deal with this. We have been struggling with a child with severe challenges this year, the amount of time she has taken from the teachers is staggering and unfair to the other students. I appreciate the support of the school, but they job is to educate not to be psychologists. General classes on feelings may help for kids who are worried, but if there is a true anxiety, more support than the teacher can offer is needed.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
2433 posts
2096 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
smartie wrote: In my cases, i don't really worry academic stuff because it's easy finding private tutors or classes.

It's more about social part. Technically we are still in social distancing so he can't play with his friends.

Although we play with him after work such as riding, but again, we don't necessarily have same interest and he is lack of kids level socialization. This is the biggest problem

And in current situation, i am not going to send him to summer camp even if there is one
If its the social aspect that is concerning, there might be some activities that can be done. My kids are omniverts, they don't mind being by themselves, however, left too long, they miss the social aspect. However, it needs to be on their terms, it can be a challenging balance. :rolleyes: You didn't mention the age of your son, that makes a big difference but I believe a little younger.

Both my kids are to have a 'socializing' block every day. It could be as simple as writing a letter (yes a physical letter) or email to a friend to an on-line gathering. Depending on the other kids, they will facetime, zoom, google hang out, or whatever tech the other kid has. There's a small group of them that once a week, they have an activity call. One child plans out the activity for them to do. So far they have done a craft over the call, my kid is planning a pant night, they done exercise yoga class, and baking mug cakes, The kids plan it, the parent help.

We do this with our girl guide meetings. Some units have gone on line and run a weekly activity. The leaders send out kit lists, if the parents are stuck, we always have extra for contactless pick up. The kids follow along. It's not a play date, but the kids really like it. It should be doable if only one parent is working at home. We also have allowed supervised physical distance playdates. Our child can go for a scooter or bike ride. We brought some outdoor games which done require touching the same equipment. I only do this with other families that I know take distancing seriously. The kids are supervised too.

I don't know if this helps. I can usually help with younger ideas too, but that's has not been my focus.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Newbie
Aug 1, 2018
15 posts
3 upvotes
My son used to play hockey a lot....now he doesn't want to play other sport(from time to time basketball only) than hockey....he has a net in our backyard but he missed the ice ring A LOT...

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