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Does the current CanadianTier router deal worth it?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 17th, 2020 3:10 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 26, 2018
21 posts
4 upvotes

Does the current CanadianTier router deal worth it?

I am a beginner woodworker for weekends/nights in garage...and I am looking for purchasing a set of router and bits. Do not want to pay for the premium for dewalt or bosch etc...Not even sure how much further I would progress home project wise with the router...Canadian tier has some deals ongoing currently. Wonder if anyone could give some advise?

The router combo kit below is 150$ currently. I heard people say bad things about MasterCraft but not sure the specific...
https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mast ... p.html#srp

The router bit set below is 75$ currently and it is mastercraft as well...but the bits are only for 1/4" shank.
https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mast ... 6870p.html

The alternatives I am looking at are the two routers below from homedepot.

This Ryobi plunge router looks good but with roughly the same price, it does not come as well equipped as the mastercraft combo above...Maybe it has better quality and durability?
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ryobi- ... 1000721583

This Ryobi router below is the cheapest I guess I can get locally from a well known brand and it does come with three 1/4" bits for me to start without paying any extra...
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ryobi- ... 1000721586

Thanks!
/S
10 replies
Deal Addict
Sep 12, 2007
2501 posts
783 upvotes
The maximum router goes for sale at $99 once or twice a year. I would recommend if you can wait, that is a great value. I have one and it's great, will be installing in a router table when I have a chance and keep the small one I have for.lighter duty
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
15402 posts
16476 upvotes
Oakville
I picked up the Maximum router for $99, mostly because there were many times it would have been very handy, even if I wasn't doing a ton of wood finishing.
Anyhow, used it for the first time recently, worked well. I bet it's on par with the Ryobi for quality.

I do need some additional bits though. Is this set a good deal for occasional use? https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mast ... 6870p.html
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 26, 2018
21 posts
4 upvotes
It is indeed great value!! I guess I will wait :) If I bought the maximum router, then I would still need to purchase bits...Will see if the maximum bit set would go onsale as well.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 26, 2018
21 posts
4 upvotes
I almost bought the cheaper ryobi...if I can catch the maximum deal, it is certainly worth. After reading more, I think I might prefer the maximum 1/2" and 1/4" bit combo set over this 75$ mastercraft set, if that one goes onsale as well.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9400 posts
4852 upvotes
Paris
The Ryobi plunge router you linked is one of my routers. It’s a very good unit, except with mine you need to make sure the plunge lock is in place properly or it will slowly rise up with vibration of the motor.

I also have a Ridgid which came with both base styles, and a fixed Milwaukee (Plus all my other routers). The Ridgid is a considerably better router in all aspects and I think the sweet spot for router price vs value. The problem with a really bad tool like a router is your own safety, and the cheap ones really arent forgiving for beginners. So you are not only fighting your own inexperience, but now you are fighting with the tool.

I know the Ridgid one is more, but you will pass it on to your kids and be much happier. I made some really nice on site trim for a buddy when we did his poker room last summer with it. https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ridgid ... 1000663450

The Milwaukee routers I have are all rock solid but pricey.
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 26, 2018
21 posts
4 upvotes
Jerico wrote: The Ryobi plunge router you linked is one of my routers. It’s a very good unit, except with mine you need to make sure the plunge lock is in place properly or it will slowly rise up with vibration of the motor.
...
Does it mean the Ryobi plunge one has loose lock overtime? Saw a similiar claim on youtube when I did my initial research.
I did consider the ridgid one but removed it from my list due to the price... I will reconsider it if it is recommended.
Member
Feb 26, 2019
357 posts
315 upvotes
Ottawa
I would listen to Jerico. Spend a little more on the Rigid or even one of the higher end tool company offerings. If you are starting to do any finer work, such as furniture, a cheap router will be difficult to use and really get in our way. Routers can be dangerous, you want a tool that can trust. I have a big old porter cable, and it is amazing.
Member
User avatar
Oct 21, 2009
412 posts
503 upvotes
Jerico wrote: The Ryobi plunge router you linked is one of my routers. It’s a very good unit, except with mine you need to make sure the plunge lock is in place properly or it will slowly rise up with vibration of the motor.

I also have a Ridgid which came with both base styles, and a fixed Milwaukee (Plus all my other routers). The Ridgid is a considerably better router in all aspects and I think the sweet spot for router price vs value. The problem with a really bad tool like a router is your own safety, and the cheap ones really arent forgiving for beginners. So you are not only fighting your own inexperience, but now you are fighting with the tool.

I know the Ridgid one is more, but you will pass it on to your kids and be much happier. I made some really nice on site trim for a buddy when we did his poker room last summer with it. https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ridgid ... 1000663450

The Milwaukee routers I have are all rock solid but pricey.
Ridgid also has a lifetime service agreement, but remember to register your tool after the purchase.

Which bits would you recommend?
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9400 posts
4852 upvotes
Paris
m1xed0s wrote: Does it mean the Ryobi plunge one has loose lock overtime? Saw a similiar claim on youtube when I did my initial research.
I did consider the ridgid one but removed it from my list due to the price... I will reconsider it if it is recommended.
It’s no worse today than the 6 years or so I got it when I couldn’t find my good plunge router. When you start above the work surface and plunge into it, there is a little lever you lock. If you don’t crank the snot out of mine locked, it will come loose on you if you are routing very far (a 20” edge vs just a small piece)

My Ryobi plunge is now permanently mounted as a circle cutting router, and it works very well for that.

The Ridgid one does both plunge and fixed base so its the best of both worlds really. I found it much more useful than what I got it for as a dedicated dovetail router (as it doesn’t require a base adaptor for bushings). It’s one of those cases where its a router you wont need to trade out of as a some time DIYer as it will do everything you need and above all else, you wont need to fight with the shortcomings of it when you use it once or twice a year. Or ruin a good piece of something, which costs time and money.

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