Health & Wellness

Locked: Does your family doctor get notified about your walk in clinic visits?

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 14th, 2022 4:34 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 15, 2020
36 posts
73 upvotes
Timmins

Does your family doctor get notified about your walk in clinic visits?

You are probably thinking that this is for some kind of drug shopping but it's actually....I had a lump on my left ball

I have a female doctor and I was too embarrassed to bring that up with her so I got it done at a walk in clinic

Should I just expect that she knows I had this done or should I bring this up with her separately? I just want to make sure that this issue is followed because there's still a lump there and they couldn't find it on the ultrasound and that was about two years ago.
15 replies
Member
Nov 27, 2004
395 posts
53 upvotes
Get yourself to a doctor as soon as possible. Don't worry about the notification - your health is more important.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 15, 2020
4711 posts
3475 upvotes
ntralica wrote: You are probably thinking that this is for some kind of drug shopping but it's actually....I had a lump on my left ball

I have a female doctor and I was too embarrassed to bring that up with her so I got it done at a walk in clinic

Should I just expect that she knows I had this done or should I bring this up with her separately? I just want to make sure that this issue is followed because there's still a lump there and they couldn't find it on the ultrasound and that was about two years ago.
almost certainly she knows. The online site they use is very integrated. They even get results from the 3rd party blood testing facilities from there. If you see a specialist your doctor will also see the notes the other doctor wrote. They see everything. And it's a good thing.

You dont even to explain this to her. She will likely bring it up and already know why you went to a walk-in for this.
Deal Addict
Mar 5, 2006
2277 posts
1957 upvotes
Toronto
Your family doctor gets dinged for you visiting a walk in.
So most certainly they will know you went elsewhere.

If you're not comfortable "laying bare" for your doctor, you should find another doctor.
Deal Guru
May 9, 2007
13697 posts
4081 upvotes
Vancouver Island, BC
Some men are such jamtarts. Think of the millions of women who have been treated by male physicians for hundreds of years. Your testicle is about as interesting to a physician as your big toe.

Years ago, I had a pain in my left testicle for days and it felt like I had a lump. I went to my physician whom it turned out was away. I saw a locum who was female. So what?

She didn’t even look at my testicle. She reached inside my underwear and felt it for lumps. She found none. It turned out I had referred pain from a left-side kidney stone.

I recently had a colonoscopy. When I arrived, the physician and nurse were female. So what? When my wife went for her colonoscopy, the physician was male and the nurse was female. So what? Neither of us was there for a ménage á trois.
Global warming will be exceeded during the 21st century unless deep reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions occur (United Nations IPCC Report 2021)

Every disaster film starts with scientists being ignored
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 15, 2020
36 posts
73 upvotes
Timmins
Thanks guys I will follow up on my visit
Banned
Jul 17, 2022
43 posts
70 upvotes
On the original question, yes, the medical clinic you are registered with does get notified when you visit another walk-in clinic, and they lose part of the fixed annual fee they get from the government for you being on their roster whenever you go to another walk-in.

Go too many times to an alternative walk-in clinic without explanation, and your primary doctor CAN "fire" you from their roster to make room for another patient.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 28, 2006
11700 posts
2570 upvotes
I think OP's concern is his medical record, not just whether she get notified for the visit. It depends and most likely not without his consent.

Jasonchewy brought up a good point, if you're not comfortable to let your PD to exam your body, you should find another doctor. Imagine there is a good probability that you will eventually need a digital rectal exam...
carlyler wrote: On the original question, yes, the medical clinic you are registered with does get notified when you visit another walk-in clinic, and they lose part of the fixed annual fee they get from the government for you being on their roster whenever you go to another walk-in.

Go too many times to an alternative walk-in clinic without explanation, and your primary doctor CAN "fire" you from their roster to make room for another patient.
People around you may have weaken immune system (or live with one). Wear a mask if possible, especially if you have cold symptoms.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 26, 2002
6455 posts
821 upvotes
BC
Any time I go to a walk in or use the online dr, when I see my dr she mentions it.
That's my 2cents worth
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 6, 2002
10131 posts
3295 upvotes
MexiCanuck wrote: Some men are such jamtarts. Think of the millions of women who have been treated by male physicians for hundreds of years. Your testicle is about as interesting to a physician as your big toe.

Years ago, I had a pain in my left testicle for days and it felt like I had a lump. I went to my physician whom it turned out was away. I saw a locum who was female. So what?

She didn’t even look at my testicle. She reached inside my underwear and felt it for lumps. She found none. It turned out I had referred pain from a left-side kidney stone.

I recently had a colonoscopy. When I arrived, the physician and nurse were female. So what? When my wife went for her colonoscopy, the physician was male and the nurse was female. So what? Neither of us was there for a ménage á trois.
We’ll said. Doctors are scientist and are much more concerned about what that could be in your gentile area then judging your cock and balls

I was having a discussion with a doctor about this. They say almost every patient male or female later in life wants a female doctor. However it’s a common problem with young men to not want to share gentile problems with female doctors.

It’s illogical in my books, but I suppose with religion or upbringing (sports culture) one may be very uncomfortable.
Autocorrect sucks
Deal Addict
Jun 29, 2010
1345 posts
2271 upvotes
ntralica wrote: I have a female doctor and I was too embarrassed to bring that up with her so I got it done at a walk in clinic
MexiCanuck wrote: Some men are such jamtarts. Think of the millions of women who have been treated by male physicians for hundreds of years. Your testicle is about as interesting to a physician as your big toe.

Years ago, I had a pain in my left testicle for days and it felt like I had a lump. I went to my physician whom it turned out was away. I saw a locum who was female. So what?

She didn’t even look at my testicle. She reached inside my underwear and felt it for lumps. She found none. It turned out I had referred pain from a left-side kidney stone.

I recently had a colonoscopy. When I arrived, the physician and nurse were female. So what? When my wife went for her colonoscopy, the physician was male and the nurse was female. So what? Neither of us was there for a ménage á trois.
GangStarr wrote: We’ll said. Doctors are scientist and are much more concerned about what that could be in your gentile area then judging your cock and balls

I was having a discussion with a doctor about this. They say almost every patient male or female later in life wants a female doctor. However it’s a common problem with young men to not want to share gentile problems with female doctors.

It’s illogical in my books, but I suppose with religion or upbringing (sports culture) one may be very uncomfortable.
He asked a question in this thread, and all that nonsense has nothing to do with what he asked. WTH are you going on about? Ménage á trois? He literally says HE'S TOO EMBARRASSED. It doesn't matter if his doctor is OK with it, or how many balls she has seen in her lifetime. People who are embarrassed about their own bodies don't care, or suddenly feel better about their hangups if other people are OK with seeing their bodies. For example, somebody who is self conscious about their belly flab might never want to show it even if nobody bats an eye if they do.

Nobody who cares about these things is somehow under the impression that the doctor will definitely have to feel a certain negative way about it, or hasn't seen it before. That being said, I know for a fact that doctors do have reactions to these things that patients can be aware of (either physical reactions or vocalized reactions), or talk about patients' business to laugh about it or mock it. We don't live in an ideal world, and doctors are humans who can be just as unprofessional as humans in other jobs. If you don't know any doctors who have talked that way before for you to hear, do a Google search and you can find numerous stories where patients record doctors mocking their conditions when talking to their colleagues. Even amongst doctors or health care professionals who don't show or voice these things, you're pretty naive if you think that somehow they cease being human just because of a medical degree or seeing things many times, and are able to stop from having feelings of revulsion, attraction, arousal, humour, etc sometimes still about their patients'/patients' conditions during the course of their entire careers. Doctors aren't supposed to have romantic or sexual relationships with their patients either, but we all know that happens. Same with sexually assaulting their patients. There's a difference between how things ought to be on paper, and how things actually are in reality in the real world.

And saying "doctors are scientists" as a guarantee or shield for them to always think and act in the way you expect for them to think and act, is about as useful as saying Priests are "men of God", and will always act in the way you expect for them to think and act because of that. We all know the truth there.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 6, 2002
10131 posts
3295 upvotes
SonyCanWoes wrote: He asked a question in this thread, and all that nonsense has nothing to do with what he asked. WTH are you going on about? Ménage á trois? He literally says HE'S TOO EMBARRASSED. It doesn't matter if his doctor is OK with it, or how many balls she has seen in her lifetime. People who are embarrassed about their own bodies don't care, or suddenly feel better about their hangups if other people are OK with seeing their bodies. For example, somebody who is self conscious about their belly flab might never want to show it even if nobody bats an eye if they do.

Nobody who cares about these things is somehow under the impression that the doctor will definitely have to feel a certain negative way about it, or hasn't seen it before. That being said, I know for a fact that doctors do have reactions to these things that patients can be aware of (either physical reactions or vocalized reactions), or talk about patients' business to laugh about it or mock it. We don't live in an ideal world, and doctors are humans who can be just as unprofessional as humans in other jobs. If you don't know any doctors who have talked that way before for you to hear, do a Google search and you can find numerous stories where patients record doctors mocking their conditions when talking to their colleagues. Even amongst doctors or health care professionals who don't show or voice these things, you're pretty naive if you think that somehow they cease being human just because of a medical degree or seeing things many times, and are able to stop from having feelings of revulsion, attraction, arousal, humour, etc sometimes still about their patients'/patients' conditions during the course of their entire careers. Doctors aren't supposed to have romantic or sexual relationships with their patients either, but we all know that happens. Same with sexually assaulting their patients. There's a difference between how things ought to be on paper, and how things actually are in reality in the real world.

And saying "doctors are scientists" as a guarantee or shield for them to always think and act in the way you expect for them to think and act, is about as useful as saying Priests are "men of God", and will always act in the way you expect for them to think and act because of that. We all know the truth there.
Wow dude calm down. You can have your opinion.

If you want to see the perfect doctor fly to the states and pay for private care.

Otherwise your FREE doctor is more focused on treating you.

I do agree someone very sensitive about this matter may feel uncomfortable, they probably need therapy for that.

Otherwise if I possibly had an infection or worse I’d focus on getting an opinion and a second opinion.

Curious if you call it a pee pee and who who or are you ok with penis and vagina? Probably a lot of “science terms” for you

The OP also responded saying thanks he will take the advice.

Also curious how you know “for a fact” sounds like conjecture and sample bias.

“ I know for a fact that doctors do have reactions to these things that patients can be aware of (either physical reactions or vocalized reactions), or talk about patients' business to laugh about it or mock it.”

Enlighten me on your facts rfd non doctor scientist.

Also comparing religion to science is the worst analogy you could ever state.
Autocorrect sucks
Deal Addict
Jun 29, 2010
1345 posts
2271 upvotes
GangStarr wrote: Wow dude calm down. You can have your opinion.
Yes I can, and I voiced it, though my post was stating facts.
GangStarr wrote: If you want to see the perfect doctor fly to the states and pay for private care.

Otherwise your FREE doctor is more focused on treating you.
Not sure what your point is here. The whole point of my post is that there is no such thing as a perfect doctor, which is precisely why the claims made in the two posts I quoted are an idealist's fantasy. Doctors aren't guaranteed to not laugh at your condition just because they have a medical degree or have seen many people with the same condition. So being weary of speaking to them about issues you're embarrassed about is not simply unjustified paranoia, even barring my argument that it's more about the individual than the doctor's thoughts or reaction.
GangStarr wrote: I do agree someone very sensitive about this matter may feel uncomfortable, they probably need therapy for that.

Otherwise if I possibly had an infection or worse I’d focus on getting an opinion and a second opinion.

Curious if you call it a pee pee and who who or are you ok with penis and vagina? Probably a lot of “science terms” for you

The OP also responded saying thanks he will take the advice.
The OP was uncomfortable and that's why he saw a male doctor at a walk in clinic. MexiCanuk launched into some crap about people being "jamtarts", a bunch of condescending "so what?", and "menage a trois". Then you speak about illogical while claiming that people who are religious or with a certain upbringing like sports culture might be the kind who are embarrassed to see a female doctor for certain problems. Like what??? Why would being uncomfortable seeing a female doctor means he probably needs therapy? I was just making a point that being embarrassed about one's body, or speaking to somebody about a condition on one's body where they have to also show it, is about the patient and not how "professional" the doctor is, which you and MexiCanuk seem to think is all that matters.
GangStarr wrote: Curious if you call it a pee pee and who who or are you ok with penis and vagina? Probably a lot of “science terms” for you

The OP also responded saying thanks he will take the advice.

Also curious how you know “for a fact” sounds like conjecture and sample bias.

“ I know for a fact that doctors do have reactions to these things that patients can be aware of (either physical reactions or vocalized reactions), or talk about patients' business to laugh about it or mock it.”

Enlighten me on your facts rfd non doctor scientist.

Also comparing religion to science is the worst analogy you could ever state.
Your "science terms" is stupid and it seems like you are deliberately misrepresenting your original point. Your point was that because doctors are "scientists", they aren't going to be "judging your cock and balls". My response is that being a "scientist" doesn't make them a different type of human than any other human, and humans all have reactions to things, and can be unprofessional in their professions. That doctors can still "judge your cock and balls", talk about it with others, etc. It doesn't matter if the OP said that, he might have been talking to other members and not you two. Even if he was talking to you two, it doesn't change the issues I had with your responses. They were judgmental and full of unrealistic assumptions delivered as facts, and had nothing to do with his question.

Conjecture and simple bias? What part of Google it if you don't know, that you can't understand? Even if there was ONE example of it, that already proves my point, and there are far more than one. I wasn't comparing science to religion, I was using an analogy to show how dumb your assertion was. My point was that just because Priests are supposed to be all holy and God worshipping men of the cloth doesn't mean anything in guaranteeing they will act like pious men of God. They go around molesting little boys. So doctors being "scientists", doesn't mean that they can't also think and act the way people like you don't expect them to think and act. It's meaningless. Having a medical degree or being a doctor as a profession doesn't somehow change how they think and act anymore than any other human, and doesn't guarantee they'll conform to some narrow range of allowed thoughts and behaviours any more than being a Priest will make Priests conform to some narrow range of allowed thoughts and behaviours that will guarantee they won't have thoughts of molesting boys and actually molesting boys. I mentioned examples of malpractice such as doctors having relationships with patients and even sexually assaulting patients. Being "scientists" didn't stop them.

Since you seem not to have any reading comprehension or logic, no wonder you can't even do a search for yourself. Here are some examples of what I am talking about. The links below are "proof" that doctors thinking unprofessional things, and mocking patients to their colleagues are things that do occur and are factual occurrences, as well as doing it to their patients, and this includes other health care professionals such as nurses. What I said is not conjecture and "simple bias". The fact that there are millions of doctors in the world and you somehow think this never happens is completely illogical, unrealistic, and lacking in common sense. You're welcome for enlightening you:

https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/loca ... him/71530/
A Vienna, Virginia, man was awarded $500,000 after he unintentionally recorded his doctors mocking and insulting him while he was under anesthesia.

The plaintiff, who chose to remain anonymous, sued anesthesiologist Dr. Tiffany Ingham and three other medical professionals, who were released from the case. Ingham, 42, and her practice were ordered by a Reston, Virginia, jury to pay the plaintiff, The Washington Post reported.

The plaintiff used his phone to record post-procedure advice and aftercare instructions from his doctors during the April 2013 colonoscopy procedure.

While checking his phone on his way home, the plaintiff found he had recorded the entire examination and heard his doctors insulting him when he was under anesthesia.

Ingham was recorded mocking the amount of medicine needed to anesthetize the plaintiff.

"After five minutes of talking to you in pre-op, I wanted to punch you in the face and man you up a little bit,"
Ingham is heard saying.

Ingham and others mocked the plaintiff for taking many medications. One of the plaintiff’s medications, Gabapentin, was prescribed to treat an irritation in his genital area. A medical assistant touched the man's genitals and commented she might have contracted a sexually transmitted infection.
https://time.com/3933453/anesthesia-pho ... ny-ingham/
A Virginia man has been awarded $500,000 in medical malpractice and punitive damages by a jury after his phone’s voice recorder, accidentally left on during a procedure, captured cruel and mocking comments his doctors made about him while he was under anesthesia.
In the recording, which jurors heard as part of the three-day trial that took place in mid June, anesthesiologist Tiffany Ingham can be heard with other doctors and assistants calling the man (who remained anonymous in the case) a “wuss” and a “retard,” the Washington Post reports. “After five minutes of talking to you in pre-op, I wanted to punch you in the face,” Ingham says.

The recording also caught the doctors calling the man names, mocking his health, and planning how to avoid him after the surgery. At one point, Ingham calls the patient “annoying” and suggests that the gastroenterologist performing the surgery fake an urgent summons in order to escape a post-op discussion.
https://archive.nytimes.com/well.blogs. ... -patients/
Paywall version: https://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/heal ... 4case.html
Does your doctor call you names once you leave the exam room? In today’s Cases column, Dr. Michael W. Kahn writes about doctors who speak about their patients in unflattering terms, and the risk that poses to patient care. He writes:

“I saw the Whale in clinic this week. Her incision looks great!”

Thus spoke a surgeon to a wide-eyed medical student here at Harvard who related the comment to her peers (and me) in a group discussion about professional development. The Whale’s condition was morbid obesity, and her incision was from weight-loss surgery.

The student was appalled at her mentor’s seeming callousness, and so were others, who eagerly shared similar experiences.
They allowed that this kind of battlefield humor (out of patients’ earshot, of course) was a way of dealing with stress. But they were astonished at the pervasiveness of such language and the apparent relish with which even senior physicians participated.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions ... _manual_43
The laughter of the ER staff echoed down the hall as Lauren, a nurse in Texas, talked about a patient who had ingested “a thousand ears of corn,” requiring her to repeatedly unclog kernels from the oral-suction tubing. The episode had earned Lauren surprise gifts of corn nuggets from a respiratory therapist and a can of corn from an EMS technician. But not everyone found the story so funny. When Lauren entered a patient’s room nearby, the patient said to her: “I hope you’re not that insensitive when you’re telling your friends about me later.”

Although patients typically don’t overhear it, a surprising amount of backstage joking goes on in hospitals — and the humor can be dark. Doctors and nurses may refer to dying patients as “circling the drain,” “heading to the ECU” (the eternal care unit) or “approaching room temperature.” Some staff members call the geriatric ward “the departure lounge.” Gunshot wound? “Acute lead poisoning.” Patient death? “Celestial transfer.”

“Laypeople would think I’m the most awful human being in the world if they could hear my mouth during a Code Blue,”
Lauren told me when I was reporting my new book on nursing. (I agreed to use only her first name, so she could speak freely about behind-the-scenes hospital life.)

Indeed, while people may readily excuse gallows humor among, say, soldiers at war, they may have a lower tolerance for it among health-care professionals. “Derogatory and cynical humour as displayed by medical personnel are forms of verbal abuse, disrespect and the dehumanisation of their patients and themselves,” Johns Hopkins University professor emeritus Ronald Berk contended in the journal Medical Education. “Those individuals who are the most vulnerable and powerless in the clinical environment ... have become the targets of the abuse.”
Researchers at Northeast Ohio Medical University say the patients most likely to be joked about are the ones perceived to have brought on their own medical problems.
Consider the case of a Virginia colonoscopy patient who says he set his cellphone to record post-procedure instructions and ended up recording his doctors making fun of him while he was under anesthesia. The patient claims that his doctors called him a “retard” and joked that he might have syphilis or “tuberculosis in the penis.” He is suing for defamation and seeking more than $1 million in damages.

“Tuberculosis in the penis” is funny because it makes no sense. But “retard” is an unacceptable word under any circumstances. If the patient’s claims are true, his doctors crossed a line.

Of course, it’s an odd case, because the humor was supposed to be private. Doctors and nurses usually make every effort to ensure that backstage humor stays backstage.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/mor ... istressed/
The comments afterward became personal. The surgeon and the anesthesiologist repeatedly referred to her belly button in jest. “Did you see her belly button?” one doctor said, followed by peals of laughter.

At another point in the procedure, the anesthesiologist appeared to refer to Easter as “always the queen,” to which the surgeon responded, “I feel sorry for her husband.”

The surgeon also used the name “Precious” several times in a manner that Easter interpreted as racial.

“Precious, yes, this is Precious over here, saying hi to Precious over there,” he can be heard saying
in the recording, though it is unclear whom he is addressing. Moments later, he asked: “What do her eyes look like? You know the eyes are the windows to the soul.”

After the doctors concurred that there had been many “teaching moments” that day, the anesthesiologist asked, “Do you want me to touch her?”

“I can touch her,” the surgeon is heard saying.

“That’s a Bill Cosby suggestion,” someone interjected. “Everybody’s got things on phones these days. Everybody’s got a camera.”


“Do you have photos?” the surgeon asked a couple times. “[indiscernible] thought about it, but I didn’t do it.”

While much of the exact dialogue is difficult to discern from the recording, Easter was distressed by what she believed to be its subject matter. She thought “Precious” might be an allusion to the 2009 movie of the same name, chronicling the life of an illiterate African American teenager who suffers childhood abuse.

“He called me Precious, an African American obese woman who was raped by her father,” Easter told The Post. She also thought the comments about “touching” and Bill Cosby were suggestive, and according to her, the surgeon said: “I thought about touching her. I could take pictures.”

“To think that I’m lying there,” Easter said, “and they’re talking about touching me inappropriately. Sexually.”
https://abc13.com/doctor-mocks-patient- ... t/3618781/
LOS GATOS, California -- An emergency room doctor has been suspended after cursing and mocking a man who said he had an anxiety attack.

The San Jose Mercury News reports that Dr. Beth Keegstra, a contract doctor with El Camino Hospital in Los Gatos, was suspended after she was recorded on June 11 questioning whether 20-year-old Samuel Bardwell was sick or just looking for drugs.

Bardwell's father, Donald, said his son suffers anxiety attacks and takes the drug Klonopin. But the college student hadn't picked up a prescription for two days before suffering an attack and collapsing after basketball practice. He was transported by ambulance to an emergency room.

Donald recorded Keegstra scoffing when Samuel said he couldn't inhale.

She replied, "You must be dead," and called him "the least sick of all the people who are here, who are dying."

Samuel said he received this treatment after waiting three hours to see a doctor.

"There, you picked your head up. Now don't try and tell me you can't move. Sit up, sit up, Sit up, Sit up! I'm having you sit up!" Keegstra said in the video, as she yanked on Bardwell's arm.

Samuel said he told the doctor parts of his body were numb, he was in pain, and having trouble breathing.

"He can't inhale! Wow! He must be dead. Are you dead, sir? I don't understand, you are breathing just fine," Keegstra said in the video, laughing. "Do you want us to wheel you to your house in a gurney?"

Samuel said when Keegstra arrived to examine him, she was accompanied by a security guard. He said that's when he asked his dad to start recording.

"I said, 'Hey Dad, can you please take out your phone? I need you to take out your phone now,' because I had a feeling something was going to happen," Samuel said. "They just were not taking care of me from the beginning."

At another point in the video, as Keegstra used her stethoscope on Samuel, she said, "No. You have changed your story every (expletive) time."

She then left the room, saying, "Put an IV in him, give him a liter fluid and we'll get him out of here. That's what he says he needs. He's obviously a doctor."
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 6, 2002
10131 posts
3295 upvotes
SonyCanWoes wrote: Yes I can, and I voiced it, though my post was stating facts.



Not sure what your point is here. The whole point of my post is that there is no such thing as a perfect doctor, which is precisely why the claims made in the two posts I quoted are an idealist's fantasy. Doctors aren't guaranteed to not laugh at your condition just because they have a medical degree or have seen many people with the same condition. So being weary of speaking to them about issues you're embarrassed about is not simply unjustified paranoia, even barring my argument that it's more about the individual than the doctor's thoughts or reaction.



The OP was uncomfortable and that's why he saw a male doctor at a walk in clinic. MexiCanuk launched into some crap about people being "jamtarts", a bunch of condescending "so what?", and "menage a trois". Then you speak about illogical while claiming that people who are religious or with a certain upbringing like sports culture might be the kind who are embarrassed to see a female doctor for certain problems. Like what??? Why would being uncomfortable seeing a female doctor means he probably needs therapy? I was just making a point that being embarrassed about one's body, or speaking to somebody about a condition on one's body where they have to also show it, is about the patient and not how "professional" the doctor is, which you and MexiCanuk seem to think is all that matters.



Your "science terms" is stupid and it seems like you are deliberately misrepresenting your original point. Your point was that because doctors are "scientists", they aren't going to be "judging your cock and balls". My response is that being a "scientist" doesn't make them a different type of human than any other human, and humans all have reactions to things, and can be unprofessional in their professions. That doctors can still "judge your cock and balls", talk about it with others, etc. It doesn't matter if the OP said that, he might have been talking to other members and not you two. Even if he was talking to you two, it doesn't change the issues I had with your responses. They were judgmental and full of unrealistic assumptions delivered as facts, and had nothing to do with his question.

Conjecture and simple bias? What part of Google it if you don't know, that you can't understand? Even if there was ONE example of it, that already proves my point, and there are far more than one. I wasn't comparing science to religion, I was using an analogy to show how dumb your assertion was. My point was that just because Priests are supposed to be all holy and God worshipping men of the cloth doesn't mean anything in guaranteeing they will act like pious men of God. They go around molesting little boys. So doctors being "scientists", doesn't mean that they can't also think and act the way people like you don't expect them to think and act. It's meaningless. Having a medical degree or being a doctor as a profession doesn't somehow change how they think and act anymore than any other human, and doesn't guarantee they'll conform to some narrow range of allowed thoughts and behaviours any more than being a Priest will make Priests conform to some narrow range of allowed thoughts and behaviours that will guarantee they won't have thoughts of molesting boys and actually molesting boys. I mentioned examples of malpractice such as doctors having relationships with patients and even sexually assaulting patients. Being "scientists" didn't stop them.

Since you seem not to have any reading comprehension or logic, no wonder you can't even do a search for yourself. Here are some examples of what I am talking about. The links below are "proof" that doctors thinking unprofessional things, and mocking patients to their colleagues are things that do occur and are factual occurrences, as well as doing it to their patients, and this includes other health care professionals such as nurses. What I said is not conjecture and "simple bias". The fact that there are millions of doctors in the world and you somehow think this never happens is completely illogical, unrealistic, and lacking in common sense. You're welcome for enlightening you:

https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/loca ... him/71530/



https://time.com/3933453/anesthesia-pho ... ny-ingham/





https://archive.nytimes.com/well.blogs. ... -patients/
Paywall version: https://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/heal ... 4case.html



https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions ... _manual_43







https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/mor ... istressed/



https://abc13.com/doctor-mocks-patient- ... t/3618781/
All examples from the USA

I’m done with this thread the OP took the advice. You should seek immediate medical attention

Sticks and stones
Autocorrect sucks
Deal Addict
Jun 29, 2010
1345 posts
2271 upvotes
GangStarr wrote: All examples from the USA

I’m done with this thread the OP took the advice. You should seek immediate medical attention

Sticks and stones
:facepalm:

If you think that means this doesn't happen in Canada or elsewhere in the world, you're deliberately being obtuse. I did the work for you and you still stick your head in the sand. How about you go look for Canadian cases then. There are numerous ones too.

You got owned whether you want to admit it or not. As for medical attention, I realize it's immaturity and sore loser talk, but it doesn't even make sense. I do not require medical attention for having common sense and knowing how medical professionals actually act. I do not need medical attention for speaking factually about what actually goes on in the real world. You on the other hand, operate on dumb assumptions and have an idea about medical professionals from TV shows. You were ignorant of how things worked in the real world, and after being provided proof like you requested, you decided to move the goal post to the dumbest rebuttal ever - "these are all examples from the USA" :rolleyes: You asked for evidence that this occurs. That means doctors anywhere on Earth genius.

https://www.huffpost.com/archive/ca/ent ... _b_5368005
Dr Brian Goldman is a Toronto ER physician and host of CBC Radio One's WHITE COAT, BLACK ART. His new bestselling book - The Secret Language of Doctors - is published by Harper Collins Canada.
I can remember my first night on call as a newly minted resident at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Kids like it was yesterday. I admitted three infants in respiratory distress, took blood samples on two more and started intravenous drips on three more. I can remember the excitement of being the first line of defense for the little ones under my care.

Still, as I look back, it's another memory that makes that first night on call at the hospital stand out. The next morning, my senior resident arrived on the ward, saw my haggard appearance, and walked over to the wall that I was leaning against to try and stay awake.

"So, Brian," he said, putting a reassuring hand on my shoulder, "how many babies did you box last night?" Box, as in coffin. He wanted to know how many patients I'd killed! For a half-second, he kept a perfectly deadpan look on his face, then broke into a big grin.

He was kidding, of course.


That was my personal introduction to hospital slang.

he was letting me in on the secret handshake. Sharing slang is a ritual that binds young doctors to their band of brothers and sisters.

I'm amazed that there are those who are surprised that doctors keep and pass along a secret stash of slang terms -- as if doing so is highly unusual.

For those who work in high stress professions, dishing slang is pretty normal.

True, it may be that doctors have invented more slang than most other kinds of professionals.

What do the phrases "circling the drain," "discharged up," and "hanging crepe" have in common? They are just three of many phrases used by doctors that refer to patients who died or are in the process of dying. There are many more where those came from. There are probably more words and phrases used to talk about patients at or near death than almost any other clinical condition or situation.

Dark humour has been part of the culture of modern medicine for at least 70 years. In the 1950s, Dr. Renee Fox, one of the pioneers of medical sociology, observed second-year medical students at Columbia University Medical College as they attended their first autopsies. In her research from the 1950s, Fox noted that gallows humour flourished in the anatomy laboratory.
Have you heard of Dr. Doonaught? He was an anesthesiologist sexually assaulted numerous women (convicted of assaulting 21) at NYG while nurses and other doctors were in the same room as him and presumably knew what he was doing. NYG covered up his actions even after complaints.

https://globalnews.ca/news/5151937/geor ... le-denied/

Dr. Sundaralingam was an oncologist who had a sexual relationship with her dying cancer patient:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ ... -1.4990346

Doctors are human, and thus obviously not immune to improper behaviour no matter what ignorant, condescending, naive people think. This shouldn't have to be spelled out for anybody. We're not children anymore. That's as stupid as thinking police officers are somehow always straight and narrow because they have a badge.
Moderator
User avatar
Sep 30, 2001
29373 posts
8772 upvotes
Toronto
Thread derailing.

Op: best wishes and see your family doctor.
Be kind and civil with one another

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)