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[Dollarama] Berkel Knives above UBER HOT

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  • Oct 18th, 2020 2:19 pm
Member
Mar 16, 2006
271 posts
331 upvotes
Vancouver
Since this deal is in fact below uber hot, does any one have a recommendation for a good budget chef's knife?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 31, 2006
811 posts
572 upvotes
Norilsk
Pair these with the $1.25 dollar Tree water stone / sharpening stone, which I can confirm is a fire deal.

If I robbed the place I would be out by now....
Deal Addict
Dec 3, 2006
2325 posts
2766 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
DownfallenX wrote: Since this deal is in fact below uber hot, does any one have a recommendation for a good budget chef's knife?
Henckels Twin Master Yellow Handle knives, $30-$45 range..pros, butchers all use them all the time.......dont have to get fancy...just need a knife that cuts and holds its edge. Some people might think the yellow looks utilitarian and not nice in the home kitchen but I quite like it.
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Member
Feb 24, 2012
244 posts
69 upvotes
TORONTO
DownfallenX wrote: Since this deal is in fact below uber hot, does any one have a recommendation for a good budget chef's knife?
I have been using Ikea 365+ knives for quite a few years now and have no complaint about them. The only thing to keep in mind is to get them along with a good knife sharpener.
Jr. Member
Feb 4, 2016
103 posts
41 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I need that carving knife, but couldn't find any at the nearby Dollaramas. I saw a few bread knives though, but I don't need them.
Anyone tried that carving knife? How does it function?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 16, 2003
3930 posts
961 upvotes
DownfallenX wrote: Since this deal is in fact below uber hot, does any one have a recommendation for a good budget chef's knife?
Victorinox Chefs Knife
Various lengths available

Plastic handled version is the budget one. If you want a more elevated look, they have a rose wood handled option
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Newbie
Nov 25, 2018
17 posts
5 upvotes
goat wrote: Victorinox Chefs Knife
Various lengths available

Plastic handled version is the budget one. If you want a more elevated look, they have a rose wood handled option
Can confirm this is a very good knife, it's my main chef knife for years and I love it!
Newbie
Dec 15, 2017
76 posts
58 upvotes
Daf wrote: Which kind do you use?
Stone? I have a 600/2000 grit I bought off amazon for about $30 that sits by the kitchen sink.

When buying knives the most important thing is to get a good shape and size that fits your hand and cutting style. Second most important thing is never get a hollow ground knife.

The thing about dropping a fortune on a Japanese santoku knife is they suck for every day use. They're made super thin with sandwiched steel in the middle like a samurai sword, fancy damascus patterns, and some in carbon steel. What this really means is the first time you lay a clove of garlic on the cutting board and give it a good wack with the flat part of the blade and your palm to peel it, congrats you just warped the blade. Next, that extremely thin blade means it's difficult to sharpen due to the steeper angle on the edge. Third that carbon steel will start rusting on the cutting board if you don't immediately wash and wipe it down after cutting a tomato. Half of the time using it is taking care not to damage it. Perfect knife for a documentary on netflix featuring a japanese master blacksmith hand forging this knife... cut to master sushi chef slicing yellowfin tuna sashimi. Almost useless in a real kitchen.

Knife reviews are full of snobby elitists showing you how to hone your knife before each use and some of them strop the dumb things like a straight blade razor. What I do with my cheap knives is wet the stone in the sink, press the blade hard into it and sharpen both sides. Lighten up on the last couple passes, flip the stone over and repeat. Takes the same amount of time as honing but my knife is now sharp enough to cut anything. No it won't shave the hair off your arm, but what the heck does that have to do with anything, I'm here to cut a roast.
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2006
2454 posts
597 upvotes
miningminer wrote: Stone? I have a 600/2000 grit I bought off amazon for about $30 that sits by the kitchen sink.

When buying knives the most important thing is to get a good shape and size that fits your hand and cutting style. Second most important thing is never get a hollow ground knife.

The thing about dropping a fortune on a Japanese santoku knife is they suck for every day use. They're made super thin with sandwiched steel in the middle like a samurai sword, fancy damascus patterns, and some in carbon steel. What this really means is the first time you lay a clove of garlic on the cutting board and give it a good wack with the flat part of the blade and your palm to peel it, congrats you just warped the blade. Next, that extremely thin blade means it's difficult to sharpen due to the steeper angle on the edge. Third that carbon steel will start rusting on the cutting board if you don't immediately wash and wipe it down after cutting a tomato. Half of the time using it is taking care not to damage it. Perfect knife for a documentary on netflix featuring a japanese master blacksmith hand forging this knife... cut to master sushi chef slicing yellowfin tuna sashimi. Almost useless in a real kitchen.

Knife reviews are full of snobby elitists showing you how to hone your knife before each use and some of them strop the dumb things like a straight blade razor. What I do with my cheap knives is wet the stone in the sink, press the blade hard into it and sharpen both sides. Lighten up on the last couple passes, flip the stone over and repeat. Takes the same amount of time as honing but my knife is now sharp enough to cut anything. No it won't shave the hair off your arm, but what the heck does that have to do with anything, I'm here to cut a roast.
So for someone who knows nothing about knives and sharpening. You now gave me an education about sharpening. Which knife do you recommend I buy to sharpen?
Newbie
Aug 2, 2020
39 posts
28 upvotes
stovetop wrote: Henckels Twin Master Yellow Handle knives, $30-$45 range..pros, butchers all use them all the time.......dont have to get fancy...just need a knife that cuts and holds its edge. Some people might think the yellow looks utilitarian and not nice in the home kitchen but I quite like it.
Those egg carton trivets are on point
Newbie
Dec 15, 2017
76 posts
58 upvotes
Daf wrote: So for someone who knows nothing about knives and sharpening. You now gave me an education about sharpening. Which knife do you recommend I buy to sharpen?
It's hard to give a recommendation because it depends on what you're comfortable with. Always start with cheap knifes in different sizes and shapes and use them for a few months first. Buy a knife slightly bigger than what you think you need. Personally my favorite is a henkels that was handed down to me by my grandpa. The other most useful knife I have is a chinese cleaver for chopping poultry. I hate the santoku shape but it seems like that is all the rage these days. Main thing is don't think that you need an expensive knife, the knife I reach for most is still a $4 dollarama knife because I can abuse it. When you go buy a japanese knife first thing they will tell you is don't cut frozen food, don't chop, don't put it in the dishwasher, don't pry, don't cut so hard that it makes a thud on the cutting board. So basically only take it off the shelf for sashimi?

https://www.amazon.ca/Zwilling-Pro-Chef ... 07&sr=8-14

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