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[Dollarama] Philips 16W LED (100W replacement) 3000K "Bright White" Dimmable 1600 Lumen Bulbs $4

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 5th, 2019 2:59 am
Deal Addict
Aug 30, 2011
1253 posts
291 upvotes
Edmonton
Update, one of the Sylvania LED bulbs in my sister’s room has just failed. Granted it was on for more than 4 hours a day, but it’s still less than 12 hours a day. Not sure if I will get a replacement from Sylvania or if I will get something like Philips instead. Thoughts?
Sr. Member
Jan 13, 2004
747 posts
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Vancouver
GiOBoY wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 8:41 am
It's actually quite easy to spot "good" ones vs the "bad" or lower quality ones --
Look for "suitable for damp locations" and also "suitable for totally enclosed fixtures"
Both of these statements are written on the 100w costco 3-pack; the cheaper ones normally aren't.
That's only partial truth...

The ones that don't say "suitable for damp locations" either didn't undergo environmental testing (could be a vented design) or failed the environmental tests (eg. Couldn't pass humidity test). Just my opinion but if the bulb is mass marketed bulb that isn't suitable for damp locations, and doesn't have vents, it probably didn't pass the environmental testing. This doesn't mean the bulb won't last long indoors though. Just don't install it outside.

As for suitable for totally enclosed fixtures, this can be an indicator the bulb failed temperature testing in an enclosed environment. Note a manufacturer can opt not to stamp that on their bulbs to extend the lifetime rating and warranty rating of the bulb.



BTW, my local Dollarama had two styles of 16watt led bulbs. One was in a blue box while other was in the typical white Philips box. The one in blue box was significantly heavier, and had a 5yr warranty/25000hr rating, but didn't say suitable for damp environment. The white box bulb was feather light, and had a 2 yr warranty, but it was suitable for damp locations. I can't remember if it was suitable for totally enclosed fixtures though. I ended up grabbing the one in blue box but who knows how long it will actually last.
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Feb 13, 2015
1152 posts
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Toronto, Ontario
GiOBoY wrote:
Jul 12th, 2019 4:58 pm
Wouldn't the 3 pack @ costco for $8 be a better deal?
Yes, but not everyone has a Costco membership and not everyone lives in the vicinity of a Costco, nearest Costco from me is like 10km+ and i'm in the heart of the city..
😎Thanks RFD😎
Sr. Member
Aug 11, 2008
926 posts
237 upvotes
my local dollarama in edmonton also have GE 16w ~100w, and feedback on them compare to philips?
Jr. Member
Oct 30, 2012
145 posts
72 upvotes
PETERBOROUGH
mobile_mic wrote:
Jul 19th, 2019 12:37 pm
I think there is a very big difference between 2700k and 3000k for yellow colouration. I have actually migrated all the 2700k bulbs I bought originally to extremely low use bulbs in my household (back porch, garage door opener's motor, etc). 3000K is nicer, but I have found that since I switched my entire basement and all my bathrooms to 5000K, that even 3000K still feels too yellow for me. I think the right bulbs for you (and me too) would probably be 4000K (maybe 3500K or 4500K) but that market is currently way overpriced and underserviced from what I can see. If anyone has figured out a way to get affordable 3500-4500K LED bulbs, please don't be shy to jump in :)

Mic
5000K for work areas like the basement or garage
2700K for bedrooms (and maybe outside accent lighting)
3000K for everywhere else
Jr. Member
User avatar
Oct 2, 2018
129 posts
83 upvotes
Toronto
I mix the LED temps as well but not necessarily by room.

Generally speaking all my LED's are 2,700K while all my pot lights are 3,000K, i find a very good balance that way. Everywhere else is pretty much 2,700K except the gargage where i also go 3,000K to get a brighter white in there to see all my items in storage bins.

I like Cree and Phillips usually get them from home depot for the A19's...the Costco ones have a very large plastic base which i don't like myself, others may differ on that. The chandalier bulb from Costso is fantastic since it comes with an adapter to fit a regular socket....for me the selling point is it's all bulb no plastic base like most chandalier bulbs have. For GU10 LED's i liked the Costco ones prior to them changing out to a silver bezel, lucky enough i found old stock with the white bezel and stocked up a few for future.
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Feb 8, 2014
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blackbirdman wrote:
Sep 3rd, 2019 12:54 pm
Yes, but not everyone has a Costco membership and not everyone lives in the vicinity of a Costco, nearest Costco from me is like 10km+ and i'm in the heart of the city..
You know the center of the universe vortex has taken over your life when 10km is too much to traverse.
I certainly would not want to spend 1-3 hours depending on the time of day to get to the nearest Costco so i can't blame ya...
All spirits are enslaved that serve things evil
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Mar 21, 2005
308 posts
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GTA
Dollarramma has successfully brainwashed everyone to accept that $4 and up is undeniably a good deal with no customer service and no return policy. Nice!
Deal Guru
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Jun 27, 2004
11599 posts
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Vancouver.bc.ca
My local Dollar Tree got some "100W" LED bulbs in. Previously, they only had 60W-equivalents. They are both the same no-name brand.
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Sep 8, 2007
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Way Out of GTA
rabbit wrote:
Sep 4th, 2019 7:46 am
My local Dollar Tree got some "100W" LED bulbs in. Previously, they only had 60W-equivalents. They are both the same no-name brand.
How much per bulb?
Newbie
Dec 23, 2013
39 posts
23 upvotes
Toronto
Finding high wattage daylight LEDs for cheap is tough. The dollarama luminus was a good deal when I had to find some bulbs. Grew my pot just fine
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Dec 26, 2007
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GiOBoY wrote:
Jul 12th, 2019 9:04 pm
I can vouch for the Feit ones.

I bought a bunch from Lowes a while back and none have died yet (even under complete enclosure).
but they are the 60w variants - I did pick up a pack of the 100w at Costco about a year ago as well .. all ok still.
Bonus: Most of the Feit packages say they are good for enclosures, while Phillips, Sylvania, etc often say not to use them in enclosures
Member
Nov 1, 2012
214 posts
160 upvotes
Markham
bigzinc10 wrote:
Jul 19th, 2019 3:49 am
Is 3000k much noticibly whiter than 2700k? I have potlights at 6000k and want some of the other lights to be less yellow but not as bright as the pot lights. Would I best be served by 3000k or 5000k?
Dude...6000K? Do you live in a warehouse? I'm getting potlights done in the next couple weeks and spent some time at home depot comparing colour temps. There are these new potlights that have switches that allow you to adjust the temperature between 2700/3000/3500/4000/5000. Comparing 4000 to 5000, 5000 looks blue. 4000 looks the closest to a neutral white. But that's what I see and that differs between people. My parents, bless their hearts, like 5000 and I end up dimming the lights when ever I visit because the environment becomes almost depressing.

I think you should go and check it out for yourself, but no 3000 is not that much whiter than 2700. 3500 would be.
Newbie
Dec 23, 2013
39 posts
23 upvotes
Toronto
gujusouljah wrote:
Sep 4th, 2019 8:42 am
Dude...6000K? Do you live in a warehouse? I'm getting potlights done in the next couple weeks and spent some time at home depot comparing colour temps. There are these new potlights that have switches that allow you to adjust the temperature between 2700/3000/3500/4000/5000. Comparing 4000 to 5000, 5000 looks blue. 4000 looks the closest to a neutral white. But that's what I see and that differs between people. My parents, bless their hearts, like 5000 and I end up dimming the lights when ever I visit because the environment becomes almost depressing.

I think you should go and check it out for yourself, but no 3000 is not that much whiter than 2700. 3500 would be.
OP may have his potlights in the kitchen or washroom, where 5000k works well. I agree that living rooms and other areas need yellower light
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Mar 5, 2007
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dargydoof wrote:
Sep 4th, 2019 8:49 am
OP may have his potlights in the kitchen or washroom, where 5000k works well. I agree that living rooms and other areas need yellower light
Honestly there is a cultural element to colour temp that many don't realize.

I was chatting with some friends who originate from Asia, and to them, higher colour temps (even as high as 6k) are preferred in pretty much all living spaces. When I asked them why it came down to something simple: 'warmer' colour temps look like candle light, higher colour temps mean you can afford electricity.

This no longer relevant aspect has influenced their preferences for higher colour temps.

Personally the warmer the better for anywhere I 'live'. Only placse I tolerate higher colour temps are in 'work' areas: kitchen, basement, garage. In those areas areas it just feels better to have a higher colour temp. But even there, 6k is too 'cold' for me.

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