• Last Updated:
  • Jul 15th, 2020 9:29 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Dec 21, 2016
143 posts
443 upvotes

[Dollarama] Polarized sunglasses 3.50

Polarized sunglasses which seem to be better quality than most cheap throwaway glasses from various retailers. It is also spring hinged.
Got one for the wife and she likes them.


Location: Kingston
There were various styles to choose from.
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31 replies
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 1, 2012
665 posts
342 upvotes
Montreal
Anyone sees this in greater montreal area. Feel free to holler
Newbie
Nov 25, 2017
46 posts
35 upvotes
I would not gamble my eyesight with cheap sunglasses. Wearing sunglasses cause dilatation of the pupil, letting in more light. If the sunglasses you wear don't block UV rays this can't be good.
Sr. Member
May 19, 2008
757 posts
346 upvotes
Christianhiti wrote: I would not gamble my eyesight with cheap sunglasses. Wearing sunglasses cause dilatation of the pupil, letting in more light. If the sunglasses you wear don't block UV rays this can't be good.
I agree. Never cheapen out on sunglasses however this would be good to have in the car for emergencies
Deal Expert
Dec 26, 2010
23481 posts
8388 upvotes
Can't be any worse than the cheap ones the optometrist always gives you after an eye exam when your eyes are dilated...
Sr. Member
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Feb 9, 2005
926 posts
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Aren't most sunglasses, cheap, designer, branded come from the same manufacturer.
Deal Addict
Jun 15, 2012
2837 posts
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Saskatoon
Expensive designer eyewear may not necessarily possess the adequate eye protection that the consumer assumes the product provides. Designer fashion and high-retail-price eyewear should not dominate the decision process of purchasing eyewear without spectral testing. In fact, more harm may come from wearing poor-quality sunglasses rather than just wearing clear polycarbonate lenses.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6615932/
No need to type thank you; upvote=thanks.
Buffett, investors are focusing “not on what an asset will produce but rather on what the next fellow will pay for it.”

“Because gold is honest money it is disliked by dishonest men.” – R. Paul
Member
Dec 4, 2017
394 posts
502 upvotes
Whitby
"When you put on a pair of tinted lenses, you fool your eyes into dilating, or staying more open. That lets a greater amount of UV light in, light that can ultimately be very damaging if the lenses do not have a built-in UV filter."

No, I'm not an ophthalmologist. This is just aligned with my little understanding about sunglasses.
Do you own research.
Deal Addict
Jun 15, 2012
2837 posts
1010 upvotes
Saskatoon
Looking at the Science of Sunglasses
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/techn ... eally-need
No need to type thank you; upvote=thanks.
Buffett, investors are focusing “not on what an asset will produce but rather on what the next fellow will pay for it.”

“Because gold is honest money it is disliked by dishonest men.” – R. Paul
Deal Addict
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Apr 2, 2008
2602 posts
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GTA
vistaliving wrote: Aren't most sunglasses, cheap, designer, branded come from the same manufacturer.
Finally some one understands better.
¸

- - - - -
;)
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Aug 3, 2006
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vistaliving wrote: Aren't most sunglasses, cheap, designer, branded come from the same manufacturer.
Yep. Luxottica. They design and make over 80% of all sunglasses and prescription frames in the world. They also own optical stores like LensCrafters and most optical stores in department stores. Those Ray-Bans, Burberrys, DKNY sunglasses with $350 prices are all designed and made by Luxottica. That's also why there are never any sales on sunglasses - it's a near monopoly.
Last edited by Mulder and Scully on Jul 15th, 2020 5:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sr. Member
Oct 4, 2010
841 posts
467 upvotes
Surrey
there was a test done on expensive vs dollar store glasses for UV protection and they were equivalent if not better. I think it's because the UV protection is already in the plastic material . it' s not like glass lenses where a layer is sprayed on.

also for polorized lenses, do things look wiggly when you are wearing them and looking on your phone, or car's lcd screen??
Newbie
Jul 4, 2008
28 posts
18 upvotes
Brantford
These glasses / sunglasses manufacturers want you to associate their brand with quality versus the cheaper stuff... And associate them with worth the markup and price.

But are ANY of them worth 100x more?!? ($3.⁵⁰ VS $350) I sincerely doubt it. About as likely as the CEO be worth a hundred times more salary than the average worker at their company!

The metal frames and albeit good lenses might be $20 in materials... Vs $0.50 in the Dollarama ones.

But an average pair of plastic frames with mideling lenses that would compare with Dollaramas MIGHT cost something like $70 - $100 for an off-the-shelf non-rx pair at a focused glasses store (LOL focused get it?)
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
33199 posts
15016 upvotes
matrixfwd wrote: there was a test done on expensive vs dollar store glasses for UV protection and they were equivalent if not better. I think it's because the UV protection is already in the plastic material . it' s not like glass lenses where a layer is sprayed on.

also for polorized lenses, do things look wiggly when you are wearing them and looking on your phone, or car's lcd screen??
Typically not when you look at them directly, but off centre/on an angle, yes the image can "disappear" or you can see some "patterns" in things. Some older OEM car LCD displays also disappear or become difficult to see with polarised glasses. If I look through the window tint on my car for example, I can see a slight pattern in the tint but again this is not when you look directly through the glass. Head unit LCDs are usually totally fine, esp. more modern ones.

Another example, my cellphone I can see it perfectly fine in portrait/vertical orientation, but turn it to landscape/horizontal and can't see anything at all! Will depend on your phone, the type of display, etc. but yes things can become hidden or washed out with polarisation.
Deal Addict
Nov 26, 2014
1132 posts
2007 upvotes
Calgary, AB
Christianhiti wrote: I would not gamble my eyesight with cheap sunglasses. Wearing sunglasses cause dilatation of the pupil, letting in more light. If the sunglasses you wear don't block UV rays this can't be good.
Lmao, what? You got any evidence of cheap sunglasses leading to eye problems? I can't find a single peer reviewed study that agrees with you.

In fact I found a study that claims you are 110% wrong:

"While you may think that the more expensive a pair of shades is, the better the UV protection is, that is simply (and thankfully) not true. A recent study published in the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology looked at over 200 pairs of sunglasses on sale in Quebec City in three price ranges and tested them to see if they met the standards for filtering out harmful UVs. While there are no mandatory standards in Canada, the researchers used the four existing standards in the world: United States, European Union, Australia, and New Zealand. All tested sunglasses above the 21$ price point met these standards, and almost all of the cheaper sunglasses did as well. Price had clearly no real bearing on their ability to filter out UV light, but it did have a role to play on the clarity of the visible light they transmitted.

That dollar store pair of sunglasses I bought? I took it to a major eyewear chain and asked them if they had the equipment to verify its UV protection. Their optician tested it. Sure enough, it detected 0% of UV rays coming through the lens. (My own pair of prescription eyewear let 25% of them through.) But as the optician reminded me, you may get full UV protection for $1.43, but the optical quality may lack behind. This means cheap sunglasses can create distortions in shapes, which are annoying and could be hazardous while driving. It’s like looking at the world through an old television set instead of a 4K monitor."

In any case, your caveman ancestors did just fine without any sunglasses, you'll be fine if yours only block 99% of UV rays, mkay?
Banned
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Jan 27, 2014
5574 posts
2580 upvotes
MrMello wrote: "When you put on a pair of tinted lenses, you fool your eyes into dilating, or staying more open. That lets a greater amount of UV light in, light that can ultimately be very damaging if the lenses do not have a built-in UV filter."

No, I'm not an ophthalmologist. This is just aligned with my little understanding about sunglasses.
Do you own research.
I have good sunglasses and no matter which I wear they cause my eyes to turn red and look very tired looking. Anyone know why?
Jr. Member
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Dec 6, 2012
177 posts
64 upvotes
Potato Land
Geeeeezuz its a dollarama item people
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Sep 15, 2015
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Abbotsford
Our Caveman ancestors only lived for 30 years on average. Everything works till your 30. Then its all down hill.
Sr. Member
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Jul 15, 2009
515 posts
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Toronto
I'd still opt for sunglasses that are polarized and UV400 rated. Though I agree completely that it would be hard to name a product that is a bigger scam than expensive (designer) sunglasses. You can find an amazing selection of polarized UV400 sunglasses for less than $10 shipped on AliExpress (if you're willing to wait for shipping).

The idea that polarized lenses will do more harm than good because your pupils are more dilated also strikes me as completely ridiculous. Your pupils might dilate 50% because the polarized lens is blocking 50% of the light from getting through--but it's also blocking 50% of the UV light (which is obviously filtered by polarized lenses like any other light). So in the end you're not getting any more UV than you would have if you hadn't been wearing the glasses.

Also, it's useful to keep in mind that sunglasses have a limited effective life, because the UV absorbing agents don't have an unlimited capacity to absorb UV light. Those bonds being pumped to reactive excited states will decay in off reactions over time. A person buying a $5 pair every summer will have much much better protection than someone that spent $2,000 on their glasses and uses them for several years--also why it's a good idea never to buy sunglasses that have been sitting in the sun (e.g. from beach vendors).

I'd still consider grabbing these, if only to do a cheap (but mind-blowing) quantum mechanics demonstration of Bell's Theorem.

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