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Downspout extension - Wrong pipe used

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  • Oct 10th, 2020 9:12 pm
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2009
358 posts
123 upvotes

Downspout extension - Wrong pipe used

Hi guys. My contractor used a perforated downspout extension pipe instead of a solid one before pouring concrete. I am attaching a pic here. I had no idea what kind of pipe is best but I got suspicious when I saw puddle of water on the concrete near the extension. The contractor is arguing that he used the correct extension pipe which is perforated. Im pretty sure he was supposed to use a solid downspot extension.
I have asked him to cut the black extension pipe level to the floor and fill with concrete. I can run downspot extension over the concrete which they sell at home depot. Please suggest the correct way . Should i leave the perforated pipe burried in and leave it alone or run a new extension pipe over the concrete apron? The house has a sump pump installed.
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58 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 28, 2016
17554 posts
2213 upvotes
Out west
While I am no expert, common sense to me is with it being perforated, wont that over time allow unnecessary water into the concrete under groud because of the holes, causing it to break down faster?

Common sense to me is if you want water away from your home, you dont use a perforated pipe.

Contractor is arguing because they screwed up, and to fix it correctly is a huge issue. Now you have something that would prevent having to walk over an eavestrough extensions (and paid for as well) to having what you dont want
Deal Addict
Apr 26, 2003
1152 posts
412 upvotes
Another issue is why is that junction box opening half buried in the concrete in the middle pipe? That doesn't look right. The purpose of that pipe is to direct it away from the house, so it being perforated is pretty useless. I could see using the corrugated style for directing it, but it should NOT be perforated.
Deal Expert
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Nov 28, 2016
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Out west
exrcoupe wrote: Another issue is why is that junction box opening half buried in the concrete in the middle pipe? That doesn't look right. The purpose of that pipe is to direct it away from the house, so it being perforated is pretty useless. I could see using the corrugated style for directing it, but it should NOT be perforated.
Nice catch on the box, ya thats not any code I have ever seen. Is this a jack of all trades contractor. Looks like you have another issue on your hands now
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2009
358 posts
123 upvotes
What is the use of junction box ? Can I do somethong about the junction box? I have no idea what its used for? I havent paid the contractor yet.
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2019
553 posts
443 upvotes
hi_rbais wrote: What is the use of junction box ? Can I do somethong about the junction box? I have no idea what its used for? I havent paid the contractor yet.
It should have an electrical connection inside... it has to be accessible, ie you must be able to remove the front plate to gain access to it.

In regards to the drainage pipe..... whats the area of the roof top draining to it? does it have a positive slope? where it outlets is there positive drainage away? is there concrete below the pipe as well as surrounding it?

Maybe a picture more zoomed out would help.
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2009
358 posts
123 upvotes
One spout brings the brings down the water from main roof and the other one brings down water from the front porch.
The perforated pipe outlets 5 feet away from the house where it will go away from the house. Perforated pipe is burried in the underlayment material and the concrete sits on top of the underlayment .
Deal Addict
Nov 9, 2008
1463 posts
479 upvotes
Toronto
You've got two problems.

That perforated pipe is literally right next to your foundation wall. It's perforated on all sides, so i'd expect water/moisture problems in your basement. It should definitely be a solid pipe (PVC) if its purpose is to route water underground and eject it.

It also looks like the exit pipe is running uphill/sloped backward - could just be the picture, but water doesn't run upward.

That junction box, which is made to be accessible (you can see the black seal and removable cover) and contains an electrical connection, is now half buried in concrete and at grade level, so you'll have water/ice/snow sitting right there. That is bad.
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2019
553 posts
443 upvotes
hi_rbais wrote: One spout brings the brings down the water from main roof and the other one brings down water from the front porch.
The perforated pipe outlets 5 feet away from the house where it will go away from the house. Perforated pipe is burried in the underlayment material and the concrete sits on top of the underlayment .
So its a lot of water or relatively large drainage area, is what you're saying.

It drains into the granular, and I assume that based on the picture, the granular is not exposed at grade, so your pipe turns uphill towards the end, which is what the picture looks like. This means the vast majority of the drainage from your roof will go to the granular layer. Which basically means it will infiltrate during the summer and a portion will be up against your foundation, and if the ground freezes in the winter you'll have frost heave.

Basically all bad news.
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2009
358 posts
123 upvotes
Is my solution good ? Cut the perferated pipes at ground level and fill concrete. Run downspout extenders over the concrete to front of the house for drainage.
Also please suggest a fix yo the problem of the junction box. Thanks guys.
Deal Expert
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Nov 28, 2016
17554 posts
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Out west
hi_rbais wrote: Is my solution good ? Cut the perferated pipes at ground level and fill concrete. Run downspout extenders over the concrete to front of the house for drainage.
Also please suggest a fix yo the problem of the junction box. Thanks guys.
Your solution should be, tell the contractor to fix this correctly, or he doesnt get paid. This is all on them, they screwed up, big time. And now you have to repair it.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9147 posts
4680 upvotes
Paris
hi_rbais wrote: Is my solution good ? Cut the perferated pipes at ground level and fill concrete. Run downspout extenders over the concrete to front of the house for drainage.
Also please suggest a fix yo the problem of the junction box. Thanks guys.
That’s the cheap fox for him. I would not pay for this work. Burying that junction box was just dumb.
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2019
553 posts
443 upvotes
WikkiWikki wrote: Your solution should be, tell the contractor to fix this correctly, or he doesnt get paid. This is all on them, they screwed up, big time. And now you have to repair it.
Jerico wrote: That’s the cheap fox for him. I would not pay for this work. Burying that junction box was just dumb.
Yeah, who is this contactor? I really hope the concrete is sloped away from the house properly.... even if it is now, did you contractor remove all topsoil, use the proper amount of base material, etc? Is the home at least a number of years old allowing settlement against the house to occur.

Really, if you're off on any of the above things, that concrete is right level with your sill plate, which again is a strike, so you could just be setting yourself up for water damage in the future as well. Your grade should never be that close to the sill plate.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2015
6068 posts
2533 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
Not sure how confident to trust contractor to fix if did such a simple job so badly.

Have you paid in full?

If not and contractor unwillingly to fix then stop payments and advise will use that to hire someone else to correct.

I do suggest that junction boxes have concrete removed around them. Not sure on correct fix after that... perhaps some type of sloped sealed cover on top of junction box that can be removed if needed??
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Newbie
Sep 9, 2020
15 posts
1 upvote
is that junction box half buried in concrete? pretty sure you're gonna have to chip away and get it accessible.

but why is that junction box so low...hard to tell how your lot is graded but that should be higher..unless you made the concrete unusually thick .

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