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Drain valve dripping after flushing hot water tank

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  • Aug 18th, 2021 6:52 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1527 posts
555 upvotes
Vancouver

Drain valve dripping after flushing hot water tank

I flushed my hot water tank. Then, i closed the drain valve after the flush.

Drain valve is dripping even after I closed to valve tightly. Tried adding a hose cap to stop the drip....it is still dripping....

Looks like some part in the drain valve is cracked after I did the drain.

Is replacing the drain valve the only way to resolve this issue?

Is it a do-able DIY job to replace the drain valve?
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17 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
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Woodbridge
Drain valve can be replaced as long as you know how to do it. You will need to "lock' the water pressure otherwise it will gush with so much force that you will never be able to install the new drain valve.
You do not need to empty the tank either to change the drain valve. If not done properly, please expect a severe potential damage to the water heater ( cross threads) or flood in the basement.
Fantastical wrote: I flushed my hot water tank. Then, i closed the drain valve after the flush.

Drain valve is dripping even after I closed to valve tightly. Tried adding a hose cap to stop the drip....it is still dripping....

Looks like some part in the drain valve is cracked after I did the drain.

Is replacing the drain valve the only way to resolve this issue?

Is it a do-able DIY job to replace the drain valve?
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[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1527 posts
555 upvotes
Vancouver
I would drain all the water from the tank and shut the water as a first step before replacing the drain valve. Think that would eliminate the flooding risk.
newlyborn wrote: Drain valve can be replaced as long as you know how to do it. You will need to "lock' the water pressure otherwise it will gush with so much force that you will never be able to install the new drain valve.
You do not need to empty the tank either to change the drain valve. If not done properly, please expect a severe potential damage to the water heater ( cross threads) or flood in the basement.
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Feb 11, 2007
19455 posts
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GTA
Fantastical wrote: I flushed my hot water tank. Then, i closed the drain valve after the flush.

Drain valve is dripping even after I closed to valve tightly. Tried adding a hose cap to stop the drip....it is still dripping....

Looks like some part in the drain valve is cracked after I did the drain.

Is replacing the drain valve the only way to resolve this issue?

Is it a do-able DIY job to replace the drain valve?
Which part is it dripping from? The tank threads? Or the valve threads? You probably didn't close the valve properly. How old is the tank?
Did you under or over tighten it when you got the adjustable wrench stuck on it?
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1527 posts
555 upvotes
Vancouver
The valve thread, which connects to the garden hose, is leaking. The tank is only 2 years old, and i have tighten the valve all the way but it is still leaking.

I was trying to use the wrench to tighten the tank thread but after further thought i gave up as the leak isnt from the tank but from the valve.

Would doing another drain and reopening and reclosing the drain valve resolve the issue?
engineered wrote: Which part is it dripping from? The tank threads? Or the valve threads? You probably didn't close the valve properly. How old is the tank?
Did you under or over tighten it when you got the adjustable wrench stuck on it?
Deal Addict
Jun 8, 2004
2026 posts
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Oakville
Fantastical wrote: The valve thread, which connects to the garden hose, is leaking. The tank is only 2 years old, and i have tighten the valve all the way but it is still leaking.

I was trying to use the wrench to tighten the tank thread but after further thought i gave up as the leak isnt from the tank but from the valve.

Would doing another drain and reopening and reclosing the drain valve resolve the issue?
it could be some calcium or mineral deposits stuck in the drain valve.
reopening and reclosing the drain valve a few times may untrap any debris stuck inside and may resolve the issue.
Sr. Member
Feb 27, 2007
606 posts
452 upvotes
cba123 wrote: it could be some calcium or mineral deposits stuck in the drain valve.
reopening and reclosing the drain valve a few times may untrap any debris stuck inside and may resolve the issue.
This ++. Flush the tank again and see if it's still leaking, if it is and the leak is very minor (drip every few seonds) you can use a hose cap to stop it. This is a common enough issue most tankless flush valves come with them, you can get cheap plastic ones but I prefer metal ones like this one.
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Feb 11, 2007
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Fantastical wrote: I flushed my hot water tank. Then, i closed the drain valve after the flush.

Drain valve is dripping even after I closed to valve tightly. Tried adding a hose cap to stop the drip....it is still dripping....

Looks like some part in the drain valve is cracked after I did the drain.

Is replacing the drain valve the only way to resolve this issue?

Is it a do-able DIY job to replace the drain valve?
Does your drain cap have a rubber washer?
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
[OP]
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May 23, 2006
1527 posts
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Vancouver
I use a combination of teflon tape + a somewhat unique setup to stop the leak (see pic) as the hose cap alone doesn't stop the leak.

my house is new that is just past the 2 years warranty. I am going to contact the builder to see is this covered as party of warranty....maybe....

If the leak continues, i am going try opening the valve to do the flush again.
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Oct 2, 2018
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Toronto
Pardon me asking but why are so many draining their hot water tank? I can see perhaps in a cottage if you turn everything off but this seems like it is in a house. Am i doing something wrong have lived in my place for 25 years and have never drained or changed my tank in that time. Wondering if i should be doing now that i read this?
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Member
Nov 13, 2019
315 posts
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Toronto
Ballroomblitz1 wrote: Pardon me asking but why are so many draining their hot water tank? I can see perhaps in a cottage if you turn everything off but this seems like it is in a house. Am i doing something wrong have lived in my place for 25 years and have never drained or changed my tank in that time. Wondering if i should be doing now that i read this?
I'm no expert but I always hear that if you haven't been doing it regularly, don't (all the sediment that settled on the bottom might f up your wh instead). However, if you have a brand new wh, you should consider doing it regularly
Deal Fanatic
Jan 21, 2018
7545 posts
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Vancouver
You are supposed to flush the tank regularly (like every 6 mo.), but it may not be necessary if the city water in your area doesn't have a lot of sediment, and/or you have a tank designed to stir up bottom sediment to prevent accumulation (usually mentioned in the features). If you see a lot of sediment coming out, consider that your anode rod may be in the last phase of disintegrating, and it's past time for a new one.

It's common for the drain valve to leak a little when you have closed it, especially if it's a screw type. As noted above, a tiny bit of debris sometimes gets caught against the valve seat, and there's a lot of pressure forcing water out. Don't over-tighten in this case. Open and re-close the valve to attempt to flush the debris out. If the leak is just a few drops, you can leave it a couple of days and see if it stops.

If you have really wrecked the valve, it can be replaced. Of course shut off the water and try to drain the tank first (in that order!).
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Oct 2, 2018
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Interesting something else my father never taught me haha, must be a city thing.

Thank you for the info.
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[OP]
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May 23, 2006
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An update.

I swapped the hose cap from the Rona's one with the Home depot's one. It worked now and stopped the drip. They both have a rubber gasket O ring......The Rona one simply doesn't work......I was trying to support Canadian business....

https://www.rona.ca/en/gilmour-brass-ho ... fb0a1c0e11

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/sioux- ... ____583694_
Deal Addict
Mar 14, 2004
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North Etobicoke
Fantastical wrote: An update.

I swapped the hose cap from the Rona's one with the Home depot's one. It worked now and stopped the drip. They both have a rubber gasket O ring......The Rona one simply doesn't work......I was trying to support Canadian business....

https://www.rona.ca/en/gilmour-brass-ho ... fb0a1c0e11

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/sioux- ... ____583694_
Next time buy a canadian rubber washer and put it in the Rona cap. Winking Face lol.
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1527 posts
555 upvotes
Vancouver
I must say i learnt something thru this exercise.

Similar products that are supposed to serve the very same fundamental purposes.

One simply doesn't work. I tried putting that into my garden hose faucet. Rona one doesn't work while Home depot one does. It isn't rocket science....
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Aug 5, 2003
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Fantastical wrote: I must say i learnt something thru this exercise.

Similar products that are supposed to serve the very same fundamental purposes.

One simply doesn't work. I tried putting that into my garden hose faucet. Rona one doesn't work while Home depot one does. It isn't rocket science....
Are you sure they are both garden hose thread?

NPT & GHT looks similar, but seal differently (threads vs washer) aren't aren't interchangeable.

Rediscovered this replacing the washing machines hoses. NPT threaded adapters are soldered onto the pipe. The old washer hoses had loose enough tolerances that they sealed, the new better braided hoses don't seal. So I'm waiting on a pair of FNTP to MGHT adapters to show up.

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