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Is it easy to replace kitchen sink? (Quartz counters)

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  • Jul 20th, 2020 4:30 am
[OP]
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May 23, 2017
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Is it easy to replace kitchen sink? (Quartz counters)

I currently have a double sink, would like to replace it with a large single sink.

Just wondering how easy it is to switch it out? Is this a possible DIY project, or should I hire a handyman, or am I better off contacting a professional installer of some sort?

Also: I want to keep the existing counter (quartz) and faucet. However, the corners of the sink cutout are rounded and I prefer the more contemporary "squared corner" look. Is it possible for someone who specializes in quartz countertops to cut out the corners a bit more to "square" them?

ETA: There has been some confusion so just to clarify--I definitely am not going to DIY the quartz cutout! Only thinking about DIY-ing the sink replacement. I would definitely hire someone to do the cutout, was just wondering if that's even possible or if I need a new countertop for that. However some people mentioned it's a pain to clean so I'm rethinking it. Maybe just a smaller radius then? Current cutout is very rounded.
Last edited by jk9088 on Jul 17th, 2020 3:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
22 replies
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Jul 2, 2001
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Sure its possible, assuming you've done diy home stuff before including plumbing. You'll need a diamond blade to cut quartz and a vacuum to trap the dust.
Depending on the sink and if you have a soap dispenser that might have to be cutout in the sink, you'll need a holesaw to do that. Might be easier to hire someone since most people don't have all the tools but it'll cost you.
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Jan 10, 2017
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Zero radius corners can be a PITA to keep clean so just be aware of it.

As for DIY, If you are okay with doing the research and spending the time, it’s doable. Many YouTube videos, just like Hollywood, show you best case scenarios but you will usually run into issues whether it’s due to a previous installer or just life not lining up. You will learn a lot and gain knowledge but you will need some patience and give yourself extra time.

Definitely outsource the cutting of the zero radius edges, its not something one shouldn’t do without some practice first on their own counter.
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Jan 24, 2009
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Regina
Following, we purchased a home with granite counters and desperately want to swap out the under-mount sink!
[OP]
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May 23, 2017
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keddie2 wrote: Zero radius corners can be a PITA to keep clean so just be aware of it.

As for DIY, If you are okay with doing the research and spending the time, it’s doable. Many YouTube videos, just like Hollywood, show you best case scenarios but you will usually run into issues whether it’s due to a previous installer or just life not lining up. You will learn a lot and gain knowledge but you will need some patience and give yourself extra time.

Definitely outsource the cutting of the zero radius edges, its not something one shouldn’t do without some practice first on their own counter.
Thanks for the heads up, I'll have to look into the cleaning aspect. They look much sleeker but perhaps not worth it if it's really a PITA. I was definitely going to hire someone to cut the corners but was considering doing the sink replacement myself. However if I hire someone to cut maybe I might as well just get them to do sink replacement as well. Like you said, YouTube makes everything look easy but things often turn out way more difficult!
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Feb 16, 2017
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jk9088 wrote: I currently have a double sink, would like to replace it with a large single sink.

Just wondering how easy it is to switch it out? Is this a possible DIY project, or should I hire a handyman, or am I better off contacting a professional installer of some sort?

Also: I want to keep the existing counter (quartz) and faucet. However, the corners of the sink cutout are rounded and I prefer the more contemporary "squared corner" look. Is it possible for someone who specializes in quartz countertops to cut out the corners a bit more to "square" them?
Is this not reverse most of the people prefer to choose double sink over single sink is what i thought ..any reason for changing into single sink ?
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mattdominic wrote: Is this not reverse most of the people prefer to choose double sink over single sink is what i thought ..any reason for changing into single sink ?
The popular "trend" nowadays is a single sink. Obviously double sink > small single sink, but IMO a large single sink > the same size divided into a double sink.

It's much more functional/practical since you can fit large items better (large baking pans and pots etc). Some people use double sinks for soaping/rinsing, but most people nowadays use the dishwasher a lot anyways and personally I don't really use the double sink feature for handwashing either. (I soap up everything then rinse, doesn't matter if there's one or two compartments.)

Friends who have switched from double to single rave about it and say they can't go back. I recently sold a house and renovated the kitchen before selling, we put in a single sink while switching out the counters and it not only looks awesome but I can totally see how practical it would be. Now I want the same in my own kitchen.
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mattdominic wrote: Is this not reverse most of the people prefer to choose double sink over single sink is what i thought ..any reason for changing into single sink ?
A single large and deep sink is way more functional that two small-ish double sink. We also went from a double sink to single sink setup last year.
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jk9088 wrote: The popular "trend" nowadays is a single sink. Obviously double sink > small single sink, but IMO a large single sink > the same size divided into a double sink.

It's much more functional/practical since you can fit large items better (large baking pans and pots etc). Some people use double sinks for soaping/rinsing, but most people nowadays use the dishwasher a lot anyways and personally I don't really use the double sink feature for handwashing either. (I soap up everything then rinse, doesn't matter if there's one or two compartments.)

Friends who have switched from double to single rave about it and say they can't go back. I recently sold a house and renovated the kitchen before selling, we put in a single sink while switching out the counters and it not only looks awesome but I can totally see how practical it would be. Now I want the same in my own kitchen.
When we got our kitchen reno'ed last year, we also went from a double to a single rectangular sink I got from Amazon. The guys who installed countertop installed the sink as well. I saw they mostly glued the sink from underside and also added a couple of support brackets from the underside. Then they put some wooden posts between the sink and the cabinet floor to hold the weight of the sink and asked us not take off the posts for next 24 hours. Essentially to allow the silicon to bond well. Complexity wise, I felt it was quite straightforward, but it certainly needs two people working together. It is not a one man job.
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You CANNOT have zero-radius (as in 90 degree angles) in a stone / quartz counter top. There is a minimum radius specified by the manufacturer, and none of them are 0. Stone fractures if you don't have a radius.

Perhaps your old sink is really curved, but if you're asking how hard it is to replace a sink, you do not want to be cutting your stone counter tops yourself.
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May 16, 2017
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IndyBeak wrote: A single large and deep sink is way more functional that two small-ish double sink. We also went from a double sink to single sink setup last year.
Obviously, functional assessment is entirely based on personal usage patterns - single sink is way LESS functional for our household's purposes.

The switch to single sinks in modern kitchen designs, IMHO, is driven heavily (like many things) by style rather than function and people adapt their usage to the new reality. Sure, there are a few things where a larger sink has benefits and others that are completely eliminated. Think carefully about how the sink is used now before making the change.
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Aug 31, 2012
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I agree. You really need to think of function. When renovating the kitchen last year I thought about it but we do things like handling raw meat, certain tools like pruning shears for flowers in the one sink and don’t mix it with our dishes in the other. We liked the distinction in having 2 sink bowls. Something to think about ...
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torontotim wrote: You CANNOT have zero-radius (as in 90 degree angles) in a stone / quartz counter top. There is a minimum radius specified by the manufacturer, and none of them are 0. Stone fractures if you don't have a radius.

Perhaps your old sink is really curved, but if you're asking how hard it is to replace a sink, you do not want to be cutting your stone counter tops yourself.
I don't know anything about radius etc.

But I think cutting stone countertops is not something that ppl should do or attempt to do without the consideration that it could crack somewhere and you gotta replace now. They do it with the knowledge that if it breaks, it's ok as it was a risk they were willing to take. Even if you hire a "professional", I'm pretty sure they are going to add a "caveat" on the job that it could break and they are not responsible
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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Jul 15, 2019
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mattdominic wrote: Is this not reverse most of the people prefer to choose double sink over single sink is what i thought ..any reason for changing into single sink ?
Double sink is unpractical, you have so much more versatility with a single bowl. And you can easily get a slider to separate it into two sinks if you ever want to use that function. Once you go to a large single sink bowl, you will never go back lol
Jr. Member
Oct 25, 2014
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I really don't think changing a sink cut out on a quartz countertop onsite is a DIY project...
I don't even know how you can cut the edges cleanly on site without some specialized equipment..
All the cut edges has to be chamfered and polished as well... countertop are usually cut and polished at the shop with water pouring down it. Something you can't do on site.

Will probably looks like some blotched job if you DIY with regular tools
[OP]
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May 23, 2017
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Sorry for all the confusion--I definitely am not going to DIY the quartz cutout! Only thinking about DIY-ing the sink replacement.

I would definitely hire someone to do the cutout, was just wondering if that's even possible or if I need a new countertop for that. However some people mentioned it's a pain to clean so I'm rethinking it. Maybe just a smaller radius then? Current cutout is very rounded.
[OP]
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freeman93 wrote: Be careful those 90degree corners in large sink bowls, are absolutely dreadful to clean... it builds up fast... find one with rounded corners.

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/blanco ... lsrc=aw.ds

Have you thought of looking for a large sink that matches the measurements of your current double bowl sink?
Sorry, is that sink an example of rounded corners? That's the style I am thinking of when I say "square" corners...I guess technically it's not totally square but definitely a LOT more square than my current rounded corners, and this is the style I am looking for. So would this type of sink also be a pain to clean? Or is the slight curve sufficient?
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Jul 15, 2019
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jk9088 wrote: Sorry, is that sink an example of rounded corners? That's the style I am thinking of when I say "square" corners...I guess technically it's not totally square but definitely a LOT more square than my current rounded corners, and this is the style I am looking for. So would this type of sink also be a pain to clean? Or is the slight curve sufficient?
That slight curve changes the whole ball game haha, with this you won’t have the same issues with the perfect 90degree corner ones. It’s easy to wipe away any grime, and it doesn’t build up the same way as those 90degree ones do.

The sink I gave is an example of one with not massive rounded corner but still very easily cleaned.
[OP]
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freeman93 wrote: That slight curve changes the whole ball game haha, with this you won’t have the same issues with the perfect 90degree corner ones. It’s easy to wipe away any grime, and it doesn’t build up the same way as those 90degree ones do.

The sink I gave is an example of one with not massive rounded corner but still very easily cleaned.
Excellent, this style is exactly what I'm going for so good to hear it will be easy to maintain.
keddie2 wrote: Zero radius corners can be a PITA to keep clean so just be aware of it.
torontotim wrote: You CANNOT have zero-radius (as in 90 degree angles) in a stone / quartz counter top. There is a minimum radius specified by the manufacturer, and none of them are 0. Stone fractures if you don't have a radius.

Perhaps your old sink is really curved, but if you're asking how hard it is to replace a sink, you do not want to be cutting your stone counter tops yourself.
Looks like I described it wrong, I guess I don't need a completely square zero-radius cutout. Just "square-ish" with subtly very slightly rounded corners. Similar to the sink freeman93 posted up above. My current cutout has a large radius and sink corners are VERY curved. What are your opinions on a minimally curved (not zero curve) sink and cutout? Is it the case that just a small curve will be ok?

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