Health & Wellness

Eczema - cream options

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  • Sep 21st, 2020 4:17 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Sep 10, 2019
8 posts
2 upvotes

Eczema - cream options

I'm hoping someone can help.

I moved to Canada in January and I brought a good supply of emollient with me. I have eczema which isn't serious, but I need to moisturize significantly overnight in order to have a comfortable day the next day.

I'm using Walmart's Equate Extra Strength moisturizer which is perfect for most parts. But the big issue is my face. I am saving my strong, very viscous, UK prescription supply for my face by my supply is almost gone! I've tried most common brands of cream available in Shoppers/Rexall but nothing comes close. I can find my my prescription creams online but they are pretty expensive. My new doctor here says that I need to speak to a pharmacist (which, in all fairness I haven't done yet). I'm just using trial and error at the moment.

Just wondering if anyone is in a similar position and has found a good, inexpensive, overnight face cream which I may have missed. Anything thin or even slightly scented doesn't work because it burns my face (or at least feels like it). I had hoped that my doctor would have been able to prescribe something particular for eczema but apparently that isn't a thing in Canada? IE specific moisturizers aren't available on prescription?

Just looking for some recommendations in case I am missing something. I'll pay the premium for the emollients I know if I need to.

Thanks :)
18 replies
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Mar 3, 2011
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PaulH99917 wrote: Thank you!
One other thing you might want to do while on the website is find a source to see a dermatologist (the site can give you recommendations), many doctors and pharmacists can’t really speak too much on the subject and can possibly give you wrong information or steer you in the wrong way as not all skin types are the same.
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Aug 3, 2006
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For daily simple moisturizing I use Nivea Repair & Care. For eczema breakouts I have prescription Lyderm fluocinonide cream but I only use it when the eczema is bad. As you're probably aware, eczema has no long term or daily solution.
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Dec 11, 2003
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I use this Seba Med cream on myself and my son and it helps with dry skin. I'm sure it's not some magical cream but it does help a lot. My mom, sister, and grandmother really like it as well. I usually use it a couple of times a day.

https://www.sebamed.ca/product.asp?id=93
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Aug 5, 2013
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PaulH99917 wrote: Just wondering if anyone is in a similar position and has found a good, inexpensive, overnight face cream which I may have missed. Anything thin or even slightly scented doesn't work because it burns my face (or at least feels like it). I had hoped that my doctor would have been able to prescribe something particular for eczema but apparently that isn't a thing in Canada? IE specific moisturizers aren't available on prescription?

Just looking for some recommendations in case I am missing something. I'll pay the premium for the emollients I know if I need to.

Thanks :)
Have you tried using Vaseline petroleum jelly? It is really inexpensive and widely available.
I find it really helpful when my skin gets too dry and out of control. It is really sticky, so only good for overnight use. It's my magic bullet!

K.
Newbie
Aug 24, 2020
2 posts
1 upvote
You sound similar to me. I also have eczema and it's mostly kept at bay, but only as long as I keep my skin moisturized. The best cream I've found for my face is the Cetaphil moisturizing cream, which is a nice, thick, unscented cream. I like the 85g tubes since it's more hygienic than the tub. I use it twice a day, after washing my face with a gentle cleanser, and it works well. But make sure it's the cream, not the lotion - the lotion is too thin to do anything.

Occasionally I'll use Vaseline petroleum jelly overnight when my skin is really dry (I put it on after I wash my face, when my face is still wet - I feel like it helps to trap in the moisture) and wipe it off in the morning.
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Jan 28, 2014
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The bottom line is that everyone is different and has different triggers. I can't use many of the products listed on the Excema Canada website due to triggers. Niacinimide is definitely a trigger and is an ingredient that is any many of the suggested remedies - by GPs, Derms and Pharmacists.

I also can't use baby lotions - another recommendation. Or Nivea etc.

Face is entirely another matter than body. Hydrocortisone cream will thin skin - and facial skin, particularly around eyes is thin to begin with, and then you have people (like me) who were born with very thin skin so we have to be extra careful. And even those who can use Hydrocortisone cream should only do so for 7 days maximum. BUT OTC Hydrocortisone is only available in 1% strength - which is too strong for the face. Hydrocortisone .5% is available but only by prescription - and again must be used very sparingly. Same with steroid creams - particularly around the eyes. I of course can't use either.

In these pandemic days it is very hard to find products that you normally use - or they have been discontinued or reformulated to the point where you can not longer use them. There is a difference too between Unscented and Fragrance Free products. I suggest the OP Google that if he/she has not already done so.

OP, I suggest you provide your doctor or ask the pharmacist if a product is made that contains the ingredients that your current facial treatment contains - that way you will avoid triggers and the ingredients could well be under another name. Failing that, I would just bite the bullet and buy what you know works. After all, we are talking about your face here. I can't use anything cheap.

You will need a referral to see a dermatologist (in Ontario at least - it is different in other provinces) but it could well take several months for a referral and the derm might well recommend something that you can't use - I know, I tried.

I am going through a major facial attack as I type this. I have managed to avoid major outbreaks most of my long life, but due to the pandemic and being exposed to products that I tended to pretty much avoid in the past has managed to take its toll (aloe vera being a major one - of course it is in Hand Sanitizer and I also have issues with most botanical products). I also have rosacea - and naturally very dry skin - the dry skin being another major issue.

Since I can't wear my reading glasses at this time due to the breakout I apologize for any typos. I am washing my reading glasses and sunglasses in soap and water in preparation for being able to wear them again - and I am giving the soap an evil eye as well as pretty much everything. I know that washing eye glasses can cause issues with the coating on the glasses but that is the least of my worries.
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Jan 9, 2011
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markopas wrote: One other thing you might want to do while on the website is find a source to see a dermatologist (the site can give you recommendations), many doctors and pharmacists can’t really speak too much on the subject and can possibly give you wrong information or steer you in the wrong way as not all skin types are the same.
This. I had terrible eczema on my left hand for more than ten years; doctors would just give me a steroid cream that would help but the eczema would return as soon as I stopped using it. Finally I traced the problem to a whey allergy. I gave that up and have been living eczema-free ever since, thanks to no help or guidance from any doctor or dermatologist.
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Kiraly wrote: This. I had terrible eczema on my left hand for more than ten years; doctors would just give me a steroid cream that would help but the eczema would return as soon as I stopped using it. Finally I traced the problem to a whey allergy. I gave that up and have been living eczema-free ever since, thanks to no help or guidance from any doctor or dermatologist.
How did you find out it was allergy related?
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markopas wrote: How did you find out it was allergy related?
I had maybe 4 different people (not doctors) independently suggest that it might be a dairy allergy. I tried giving up dairy and the eczema cleared up very quickly. Then I tried reintroducing different types of dairy (milk bad, butter ok, cheddar ok, sour cream bad, greek yogurt ok, ricotta very bad, whey-based protein powder very bad) and traced it to whey. Like I said, this was all done on my own; no doctor or dermatologist sent me down this path.

Even though I've been whey-free (and eczema-free!) for 7 years now, the steroid cream given by doctors caused permanent thinning of my skin. My left hand now looks years older than my right hand, which never had the eczema. So I really recommend trying to figure out the source of the eczema rather than trying to treat the symptom.
Newbie
Sep 8, 2020
1 posts
I find things by Derma E work well for me, their psorzema cream and also using a mild cleanser by them is helpful. I buy mine from vitamin plus since they are local and have good prices compared to some other places. They sometimes have samples so check them out. You can also email derma E for some samples but they charge shipping for it

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