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electric/cordless vs. gas lawnmower for seniors....

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  • May 12th, 2021 10:43 am
[OP]
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Apr 22, 2014
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Woodbridge

electric/cordless vs. gas lawnmower for seniors....

Hi all,

Our friend is a senior in his 70's and still active however, i tested his gas Cub Cadet self propelled lawn mower and it's heavy as heck (the self-propel does NOT work anymore).

He is thinking of a electric/cordless lawnmower however I have no experience with them and am not sure if they are heavy due to battery components, can anyone with who has experience with both gas and electric comment?.......and a quick search on Home Depot's site shows the cheapest ones are around $400.

I think $400-$450 is his budget but that would be still on the expensive side for him.

Thanks all!
23 replies
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Mar 30, 2004
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How big a yard? Flat? Easy access to plug ins? How long does he expect to stay?
The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten....
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liveclean wrote: i tested his gas Cub Cadet self propelled lawn mower and it's heavy as heck (the self-propel does NOT work anymore).
Have a look at a few you tube vids, its often simply the cable needing tightening or debris in belt area so belt is off. The cable is tightened like a brake on a bike, turn the nut out at the handle.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 22, 2014
113 posts
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Woodbridge
walleye*guy wrote: How big a yard? Flat? Easy access to plug ins? How long does he expect to stay?
I think front yard is about 500 sq ft. and his backyard is about 650 sq ft.

He does have access to plug ins, however he wants to stay away from cords........only asked me about cordless (he can put it in the garage to charge).

They will be staying at the house for another 10 years at least?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 22, 2014
113 posts
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Woodbridge
Zamboni wrote: Have a look at a few you tube vids, its often simply the cable needing tightening or debris in belt area so belt is off. The cable is tightened like a brake on a bike, turn the nut out at the handle.
I actually think it's probably a simple fix too however he's set on getting a new one (which i forgot to mention earlier).
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Mar 30, 2004
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Batteries on a lawn mower will fail in 4 -5 years, so take that into account.

Perhaps a manual reel mower, if he’s active? It will help keep him active and it’s not too difficult.
The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten....
Member
Feb 22, 2017
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my elderly parents changed from gas to electric and dont regret it, but they recommended getting a corded not batteried ones its not hard to not drive over your cord/extension cord.
can't remember the model it wasn't the cheapest but works surprising well for electric
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 22, 2014
113 posts
9 upvotes
Woodbridge
walleye*guy wrote: Batteries on a lawn mower will fail in 4 -5 years, so take that into account.

Perhaps a manual reel mower, if he’s active? It will help keep him active and it’s not too difficult.
Thanks.

I suggested reel mower to him too but he refuses even though he's fairly active.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 22, 2014
113 posts
9 upvotes
Woodbridge
HiddenEmailer wrote: my elderly parents changed from gas to electric and dont regret it, but they recommended getting a corded not batteried ones its not hard to not drive over your cord/extension cord.
can't remember the model it wasn't the cheapest but works surprising well for electric
thanks.

is your parents property fairly decent size as well? 500 sq ft in front and 600-ish in back?
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Sep 9, 2012
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liveclean wrote: Hi all,

Our friend is a senior in his 70's and still active however, i tested his gas Cub Cadet self propelled lawn mower and it's heavy as heck (the self-propel does NOT work anymore).

He is thinking of a electric/cordless lawnmower however I have no experience with them and am not sure if they are heavy due to battery components, can anyone with who has experience with both gas and electric comment?.......and a quick search on Home Depot's site shows the cheapest ones are around $400.

I think $400-$450 is his budget but that would be still on the expensive side for him.

Thanks all!
Corded electric will be the lightest, but battery electric will still be a fair bit lighter than gas. Battery weight will vary by model.

For instance, when I first bought mine it came with 2 batteries and I’d start the lawn using one and and could sometimes finish on one and sometimes would need to swap and use the other one to finish up. Eventually I always needed us use both. Last year (about 5 yrs in) one was only chargeable enough for a 5 minute run and the other would barely do one lawn so would have to wait for a recharge to finish up same day or spread it over 2 days.

After that got old, I got an “upgraded” battery with a new replacement battery that was essentially the same capacity as the original 2 batteries combined but size & weight wise is about 50-75% bigger length-wise and probably just as heavy as the 2 original batteries combined. So the mower is a little heavier to push than before but is still lighter than a gas mower.

So, look at what the mower comes with battery options capacity-wise and research what a replacement battery will cost down the line ina few years. Mower “A” may be $25 bucks cheaper on initial purchase but may run $50 more per battery replacement down the road compared to Mower “B” which would make Mower B the better purchase for the long term.

I’m quite happy with cordless and wouldn’t bother going back to gas or corded unless we moved and lot size changed significantly.

Edit to add - since you’re looking for a senior you should check how easy it is to pop a battery in/out of the charger and in/out of the mower. In probably won’t present a problem but out may be harder, especially on the mower. Most mowers seem to need a small push or a strong entry in order to mate properly and securely. That will probably be ok, but getting the battery out may be a little more awkward - you need to release the catch and then pull the battery out which will need a bit of finger-tip strength to do and may be more challenging for a senior.

As a result it may be best to wait until stores open back up again so you can go in person to see which ones are easier or harder to deal with. In fact, I’d probably say it’s the single biggest usability factor that a senior would face so will be key in the decision on which one to buy.
Last edited by CanadianLurker on May 10th, 2021 10:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Jun 3, 2008
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Newmarket
liveclean wrote: Hi all,

Our friend is a senior in his 70's and still active however, i tested his gas Cub Cadet self propelled lawn mower and it's heavy as heck (the self-propel does NOT work anymore).

He is thinking of a electric/cordless lawnmower however I have no experience with them and am not sure if they are heavy due to battery components, can anyone with who has experience with both gas and electric comment?.......and a quick search on Home Depot's site shows the cheapest ones are around $400.

I think $400-$450 is his budget but that would be still on the expensive side for him.

Thanks all!
https://snowjoe.com/products/14-inch-28 ... less-motor

Sun Joe. Cordless and very light. Just plug in the battery and you're ready to go. Much easier than corded or gas.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 22, 2014
113 posts
9 upvotes
Woodbridge
CanadianLurker wrote: Cordless electric will be the lightest, but battery electric will still be a fair bit lighter than gas. Battery weight will vary by model.

For instance, when I first bought mine it came with 2 batteries and I’d start the lawn using one and and could sometimes finish on one and sometimes would need to swap and use the other one to finish up. Eventually I always needed us use both. Last year (about 5 yrs in) one was only chargeable enough for a 5 minute run and the other would barely do one lawn so would have to wait for a recharge to finish up same day or spread it over 2 days.

After that got old, I got an “upgraded” battery with a new replacement battery that was essentially the same capacity as the original 2 batteries combined but size & weight wise is about 50-75% bigger length-wise and probably just as heavy as the 2 original batteries combined. So the mower is a little heavier to push than before but is still lighter than a gas mower.

So, look at what the mower comes with battery options capacity-wise and research what a replacement battery will cost down the line ina few years. Mower “A” may be $25 bucks cheaper on initial purchase but may run $50 more per battery replacement down the road compared to Mower “B” which would make Mower B the better purchase for the long term.

I’m quite happy with cordless and wouldn’t bother going back to gas or corded unless we moved and lot size changed significantly.

Edit to add - since you’re looking for a senior you should check how easy it is to pop a battery in/out of the charger and in/out of the mower. In probably won’t present a problem but out may be harder, especially on the mower. Most mowers seem to need a small push or a strong entry in order to mate properly and securely. That will probably be ok, but getting the battery out may be a little more awkward - you need to release the catch and then pull the battery out which will need a bit of finger-tip strength to do and may be more challenging for a senior.

As a result it may be best to wait until stores open back up again so you can go in person to see which ones are easier or harder to deal with. In fact, I’d probably say it’s the single biggest usability factor that a senior would face so will be key in the decision on which one to buy.
thank you!

i didnt know there was a difference between cordless electric and battery eletric (im gonna have to google this haha).

his grass is getting pretty long and these damn lock downs aint helping......i might help him cut it but i know it's actually a passion of his so not sure how he will feel watching me do it even if it's one time haha.
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This is going to sound ridiculous but have they considered a lawn tractor?
Even if they can use battery now in a few years a tractor will still be easier than a push mower.

And yes i know they have a higher cost, but perhaps they can get some extra cash from their tax return or something?
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liveclean wrote: I think front yard is about 500 sq ft. and his backyard is about 650 sq ft.

He does have access to plug ins, however he wants to stay away from cords........only asked me about cordless (he can put it in the garage to charge).

They will be staying at the house for another 10 years at least?
My dad never complained about his corded one to me, but it did a crap job and was reallllly old.

One fathers day I bought him the dewalt cordless and he's been going on and on about how much better it is without a cord and how much better the mower is, easier to use, faster, etc

I will usually recommend the dewalt one, it goes on sale for $400 with an extra free battery and its regular $500-600 depending where you look and price matching. I have one and know about 7 other people with one who are happy with it. One of my friends has a sizeable corner/pie lot, and it takes him 6ahs if he wants to get through it all, vs the 5ahs that come with it.

For gas I would go with honda or Toro, again, for the cheap ones you're looking at $400.

For a cordless I probably recommend going with a major battery platform. You'll probably be able to get new dewalt, ryobi, makita (wouldnt recommend this b/c is overpriced imo), etc batteries for probably at least a decade to come, and can get 2x 5ahs for $150 which is much cheaper than Ego etc. And you can buy into the platform for some additional incentive.
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Jan 25, 2007
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Ryobi makes corded/cordless 40v mowers now in self propelled and not self propelled. The cordless one I got my Dad is much lighter than any gas one, so i got one for myself too. Highly recommend. Also his and mine fold up for winter storage and his even has a way of hanging it on the wall (mine does not).

I have batteries that are close to 10 years old now and still work.
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liveclean wrote: thank you!

i didnt know there was a difference between cordless electric and battery eletric (im gonna have to google this haha).

his grass is getting pretty long and these damn lock downs aint helping......i might help him cut it but i know it's actually a passion of his so not sure how he will feel watching me do it even if it's one time haha.
My bad - that should have read as “corded electric” is lightest!
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liveclean wrote: .. i tested his gas Cub Cadet self propelled lawn mower and it's heavy as heck (the self-propel does NOT work anymore)...
Due to all the extra drag from the dead self propel system, it's like twice the effort of pushing any regular mower.
Check out this thread, new toro gas self propel $440
home-depot-toro-lawnmower-20379-440-2463292/
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walleye*guy wrote: Batteries on a lawn mower will fail in 4 -5 years, so take that into account.

Perhaps a manual reel mower, if he’s active? It will help keep him active and it’s not too difficult.
I think a lot of ppl fail to consider the cost of battery replacement. From what I see replacement batteries are like $150-$200 +tx [based on 40V Ryobi batteries]. For every 5 yrs! My 20 yr old Gas Lawn Boy would have had 3 battery changes by now. Extra $450+tx! Yikes
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Just get a 16” Cordless lawnmower. I had a Ryobi one for about 8 or 9 years with original batteries and they still provide about 15 to 20mins run time.

Batteries have to be stored properly when not in use for a long period of time according to manufacturer’s specs, normally half charged.

In regards to gas vs electric, I like not having too
- buy gas for lawnmower
- yank on chord
- Change oil, plug and filter
- breathe in the exhaust fumes

Do gas mower store up right? Better to buy a new lawnmower than replace batteries especially if you don’t have a brushless motor.

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