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Electrician Question - Is it true that if an electrician does the rough-in they also have to do the finishing?

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  • Dec 12th, 2022 2:01 pm
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Newbie
Nov 27, 2018
4 posts
1 upvote

Electrician Question - Is it true that if an electrician does the rough-in they also have to do the finishing?

Doing a complete gut renovation project which involved rough-in electrical work of running new circuits and moving lighting/receptacles etc. Obviously something of this scope I hired a licensed electrician to do it.

The electrician I'm working with let me know that under the ESA rules, the electrician that does the rough-in is required to also do the finishing.

Now, I've worked with this electrician before and I genuinely like working with them and find that they do quality work, but at the same time I'm handy enough to do basic things like installing ceiling light fixtures and receptacles and was planning on doing those myself and just have him do the harder finishing stuff. But I have this weird gut feeling where he's just saying this to make additional money.

I couldn't find anything googling around that backs up the ESA rule that he's referring to. Can anyone else here confirm if this rule exists?
6 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 18, 2017
1427 posts
986 upvotes
London, On
Not sure if it's a law, but it's probably a rule that many electricians would have. They don't want to be held responsible for your house burning down because you wanted to do some of the work.
Newbie
Apr 5, 2020
7 posts
7 upvotes
That is actually true, yes. The person working under the permit can't change between inspections. The problem is that they are liable for all the work done under the permit, and that includes all the finishing (e.g. outlets, wall plates, etc.)...
Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2012
673 posts
616 upvotes
Hamilton
this might be true.

my brother bought a place that didn't have a vent hood over his stove so he called an electrician run the wiring to put one in. the electrician came before the vent hood arrived so instead of just capping the wires, he ended them in a junction box that he installed claiming he had to and when the vent hood arrives to just toss out the box and wire it to the hood.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
12159 posts
7351 upvotes
Paris
I split my permit for my shop into the main panel at 100 amps, then another for the finishing. Ended up having to do both halves myself as no one wanted to do the buried 100 amp line, and I wanted to do the finishing myself.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2002
6696 posts
1374 upvotes
Phone or email an electrical inspector, give them all the details and ask this question.
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Feb 8, 2014
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SuperFlyingSquirrel wrote: Doing a complete gut renovation project which involved rough-in electrical work of running new circuits and moving lighting/receptacles etc. Obviously something of this scope I hired a licensed electrician to do it.

The electrician I'm working with let me know that under the ESA rules, the electrician that does the rough-in is required to also do the finishing.

Now, I've worked with this electrician before and I genuinely like working with them and find that they do quality work, but at the same time I'm handy enough to do basic things like installing ceiling light fixtures and receptacles and was planning on doing those myself and just have him do the harder finishing stuff. But I have this weird gut feeling where he's just saying this to make additional money.

I couldn't find anything googling around that backs up the ESA rule that he's referring to. Can anyone else here confirm if this rule exists?
An interesting question.
My guess is that to satisfy the original permit this might be true, presumably one can only vouch for their own or their subordinates work.

That said i assume you can cancel the original permit, pay for an ESA inspection and get your own permit to complete the work. Not sure if you will save money this way though, you have to pay the electrician the agreed upon fee in your contract, pay for the cancelled permit, pay for an inspection, and pay for a new permit.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people

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