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Employer is asking me to stamp documents as P.Eng, advice?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 8th, 2019 6:52 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 6, 2015
1208 posts
675 upvotes
Vancouver, BC

Employer is asking me to stamp documents as P.Eng, advice?

I've been at my current position as a project manager for about 8 months and when I was hired, P.Eng was not a requirement nor stamping documents a requirement either. I am a bit uncomfortable with the prospect as I am not as familiar with some aspects of the company as I would like.

My boss just told me that I had been assigned a project where I would be required to stamp documents as a P.Eng. Couple of notes:
  • Job description doesn't require P.Eng, there are diploma holders doing the same thing I am (without stamping)
  • THis doesn't look like its a 1 time thing, but ongoing

What should I do? My current plan isn't the most fleshed out, but I plan to let my employer know that I was not expecting to stamp as it was not a job requirement.

Also, does this situation warrant asking for a pay raise if I will be stamping documents regularly?

EDIT: I am a P.Eng, and this position has 3x P.Eng and 4x non P.Eng. I was assigned a project usually assigned to a P.Eng (not harder or anything, it just requires stamps bc the industry is heavily regulated), doesn't look like its a 1 time thing.
We submit bill of materials, process & instrumentation dwg, and general arrangement dwgs to customers, but one particular industry requires these 3 to be stamped. I'm fine with stamping BOM & P&ID, but the GA is by a designer not directly under my purview but under the department head.
Last edited by chevyz07 on Jan 8th, 2019 8:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
16 replies
Sr. Member
Jan 1, 2017
633 posts
443 upvotes
chevyz07 wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 5:44 pm
I've been at my current position as a project manager for about 8 months and when I was hired, P.Eng was not a requirement nor stamping documents a requirement either. I am a bit uncomfortable with the prospect as I am not as familiar with some aspects of the company as I would like.

My boss just told me that I had been assigned a project where I would be required to stamp documents as a P.Eng. Couple of notes:
  • Job description doesn't require P.Eng, there are diploma holders doing the same thing I am (without stamping)
  • THis doesn't look like its a 1 time thing, but ongoing

What should I do? My current plan isn't the most fleshed out, but I plan to let my employer know that I was not expecting to stamp as it was not a job requirement.

Also, does this situation warrant asking for a pay raise if I will be stamping documents regularly?
Why don’t you ask about the reason your employer is asking you to do this?
Deal Addict
Dec 20, 2018
1637 posts
1241 upvotes
chevyz07 wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 5:44 pm
I've been at my current position as a project manager for about 8 months and when I was hired, P.Eng was not a requirement nor stamping documents a requirement either. I am a bit uncomfortable with the prospect as I am not as familiar with some aspects of the company as I would like.

My boss just told me that I had been assigned a project where I would be required to stamp documents as a P.Eng. Couple of notes:
  • Job description doesn't require P.Eng, there are diploma holders doing the same thing I am (without stamping)
  • THis doesn't look like its a 1 time thing, but ongoing

What should I do? My current plan isn't the most fleshed out, but I plan to let my employer know that I was not expecting to stamp as it was not a job requirement.

Also, does this situation warrant asking for a pay raise if I will be stamping documents regularly?
Job description is irrelevant assuming this is a non union position. Did you include P.Eng in your resume? If so, you sold yourself on certain ability/qualifications and now they're asking you to use it

Obviously only stamp if you're comfortable in what you're stamping. I would bring up that PD,dues and extra responsibility beyond what you expected (stamping) and they advertised and ask for bump in pay
damatick wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:08 pm
not worth the risk.
What risk? Obviously OP should only stamp if he feels comfortable enough and knows enough about what he's stamping
Member
Jul 8, 2014
297 posts
150 upvotes
AB
StatsGuy wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:21 pm
Job description is irrelevant assuming this is a non union position. Did you include P.Eng in your resume? If so, you sold yourself on certain ability/qualifications and now they're asking you to use it

Obviously only stamp if you're comfortable in what you're stamping. I would bring up that PD,dues and extra responsibility beyond what you expected (stamping) and they advertised and ask for bump in pay



What risk? Obviously OP should only stamp if he feels comfortable enough and knows enough about what he's stamping
Guess we need more detail, but sounded like the employer found out that OP is an P.eng and is asking him to sign off on documents in lieu of hiring an actual P.eng
My assumption is that OP took a job (over qualified) and the employer is taking advantage of this.
Member
Aug 11, 2004
234 posts
14 upvotes
Other items to consider
- have you received any training in this regards by employer
- does employer pay P.Eng. annual fee?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Apr 16, 2001
15127 posts
1829 upvotes
Oshawa
http://peo.on.ca/index.php/ci_id/20587/la_id/12004.htm

The engineer’s seal is a true hallmark of the profession, yet many engineers
don’t know when, where and how to use it. It’s an important issue, because
a failure to seal when appropriate is a violation of the Professional
Engineers Act and may subject the engineer to discipline proceedings.


If he wants your stamp as a qualified P.Eng, tell him he's going to pay you as a P.Eng.
Whenever someone asks a question that starts with "Why do they..." or "Why don't they...", the answer is always a) money, b) stupidity, or c) both.
Deal Addict
Dec 20, 2018
1637 posts
1241 upvotes
JAC wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:53 pm
http://peo.on.ca/index.php/ci_id/20587/la_id/12004.htm

The engineer’s seal is a true hallmark of the profession, yet many engineers
don’t know when, where and how to use it. It’s an important issue, because
a failure to seal when appropriate is a violation of the Professional
Engineers Act and may subject the engineer to discipline proceedings.


If he wants your stamp as a qualified P.Eng, tell him he's going to pay you as a P.Eng.
Unless op advertised himself as a P.eng to get the job in first place
Member
Nov 22, 2017
277 posts
150 upvotes
You have to be honest with yourself OP. Stamping when you are not confident and comfortable doing it should not be done. You need to let your employer know this. Unless of course you understand all the details of what you are stamping but then if you did you wouldn't be asking people here.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
2079 posts
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Alberta
damatick wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:08 pm
not worth the risk.
Not to mention probably illegal. It’s like you practicing to be a doctor without a license. They have license requirements for a reason. If they need someone to stamp documents they should hire a PEng.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
2079 posts
836 upvotes
Alberta
chevyz07 wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 5:44 pm
I've been at my current position as a project manager for about 8 months and when I was hired, P.Eng was not a requirement nor stamping documents a requirement either. I am a bit uncomfortable with the prospect as I am not as familiar with some aspects of the company as I would like.

My boss just told me that I had been assigned a project where I would be required to stamp documents as a P.Eng. Couple of notes:
  • Job description doesn't require P.Eng, there are diploma holders doing the same thing I am (without stamping)
  • THis doesn't look like its a 1 time thing, but ongoing

What should I do? My current plan isn't the most fleshed out, but I plan to let my employer know that I was not expecting to stamp as it was not a job requirement.

Also, does this situation warrant asking for a pay raise if I will be stamping documents regularly?
Are you a p eng?
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
2154 posts
1140 upvotes
Does the company have a CoA?

If not, then basically you can't (legally) stamp the documents anyways. A firm that employs a P.Eng. to do regulated engineering work must itself have Authorization from APEG*. For APEGA, to obtain this, its quite a significant process as the entire chain of engineering management must be extensively documented and validated. With all of such subject to APEGA compliance audit. Even a sole proprietor/practictioner offering consulting services must obtain a CoA.

Of course, it goes without saying that it is professional misconduct when..... (review your professional practice exam materials, and probably start looking for another job as well....). My friends with EIT or P.Eng. stamps basically lock them in a filing cabinet at home and view them as "lawsuit attractants".
Deal Fanatic
Oct 7, 2010
8597 posts
1014 upvotes
Stamp if you did the work. If not, dont stamp it.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 6, 2015
1208 posts
675 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
a tl;dr to most if not all questions here:

I am a P.Eng, and this position has 3x P.Eng and 4x non P.Eng. I was assigned a project usually assigned to a P.Eng (not harder or anything, it just requires stamps bc the industry is heavily regulated), doesn't look like its a 1 time thing.
StatsGuy wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:21 pm

Job description is irrelevant assuming this is a non union position. Did you include P.Eng in your resume? If so, you sold yourself on certain ability/qualifications and now they're asking you to use it

Obviously only stamp if you're comfortable in what you're stamping. I would bring up that PD,dues and extra responsibility beyond what you expected (stamping) and they advertised and ask for bump in pay



What risk? Obviously OP should only stamp if he feels comfortable enough and knows enough about what he's stamping
damatick wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:32 pm

Guess we need more detail, but sounded like the employer found out that OP is an P.eng and is asking him to sign off on documents in lieu of hiring an actual P.eng
My assumption is that OP took a job (over qualified) and the employer is taking advantage of this.
fbrm wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:41 pm
Other items to consider
- have you received any training in this regards by employer
- does employer pay P.Eng. annual fee?
No training but yes they do pay the fee
JAC wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 6:53 pm
http://peo.on.ca/index.php/ci_id/20587/la_id/12004.htm

The engineer’s seal is a true hallmark of the profession, yet many engineers
don’t know when, where and how to use it. It’s an important issue, because
a failure to seal when appropriate is a violation of the Professional
Engineers Act and may subject the engineer to discipline proceedings.


If he wants your stamp as a qualified P.Eng, tell him he's going to pay you as a P.Eng.
StatsGuy wrote:
Jan 7th, 2019 10:58 pm

Unless op advertised himself as a P.eng to get the job in first place
Extrahard wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 12:02 am
You have to be honest with yourself OP. Stamping when you are not confident and comfortable doing it should not be done. You need to let your employer know this. Unless of course you understand all the details of what you are stamping but then if you did you wouldn't be asking people here.
Not that I'm not confident in my own work, but I'm not familiar with some parts of the company yet
abc123yyz wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 1:51 am

Not to mention probably illegal. It’s like you practicing to be a doctor without a license. They have license requirements for a reason. If they need someone to stamp documents they should hire a PEng.
abc123yyz wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 1:53 am

Are you a p eng?
burnt69 wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 3:39 am
Does the company have a CoA?

If not, then basically you can't (legally) stamp the documents anyways. A firm that employs a P.Eng. to do regulated engineering work must itself have Authorization from APEG*. For APEGA, to obtain this, its quite a significant process as the entire chain of engineering management must be extensively documented and validated. With all of such subject to APEGA compliance audit. Even a sole proprietor/practictioner offering consulting services must obtain a CoA.

Of course, it goes without saying that it is professional misconduct when..... (review your professional practice exam materials, and probably start looking for another job as well....). My friends with EIT or P.Eng. stamps basically lock them in a filing cabinet at home and view them as "lawsuit attractants".
This one I'm not sure
spike1128 wrote:
Jan 8th, 2019 6:16 am
Stamp if you did the work. If not, dont stamp it.
Jr. Member
Mar 17, 2010
198 posts
208 upvotes
Toronto
Employers in BC don't need CoA.

OP, this is really simple. If you are not comfortable stamping it, then nobody can force you to. Generally BOM's and PI&D's are created off of main GA's, so not sure how you are comfortable in stamping those but not GA's. Unless you are stamping off sub-systems and not complete assemblies.

Anyways, its clear that you feel lacking some understanding of those GA's hence not feeling comfortable stamping...which is completely fine. Just present it like this to your employer and have a plan to get start getting familiarized with the drawings.

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