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Engineer vs. Engineer Technologist

[OP]
Newbie
Mar 10, 2015
36 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON

Engineer vs. Engineer Technologist

Hey! I'm still in Senior High School right now, but I'm just very concerned with my marks, but as well very confused about something between a few careers that I was interested in trying out. The two I'd like to ask about today are the differences between Engineers (As in, those with a Bachelors of Engineering) and Engineer Technologists (As in, those with 3 year advanced diplomas). I've been looking around the site for a while, so I know about most of the differences, but if I could just ask a few questions about them, that would be really cool too? Well, here are my questions.

* Is it possible to get a P.Eng certification if I were to get a diploma as an Engineer Technologist? And even if I did, would this technically allow me to bill myself as a Professional Engineer, or would my Technologist diploma hold me back?
* What are the chances of me being able to attain a managing position after a fair amount of years in the field?
* Where do Engineering Technologists usually work compared to Engineers? (City/Suburb/Rural, I mean)
* Is there any Engineering Program in Ontario that allows you to transfer Engineering Technologist Program (For example, if I took Electrical Engineering Technologist (co-op) at a College) credits to a CEAB Certified Engineering Program? I haven't been able to find them.

That's all of the questions I have for now. If anyone could answer them, that would be perfect! Thanks!
140 replies
Jr. Member
Jul 15, 2009
161 posts
66 upvotes
Edmonton
Answers:
1. No as you can not get P.Eng with a diploma, end of story.
2. Depends on the person, capabilities, which field, location, company, opportunities, etc... Anything from 2 years to 20 years.
3. Generally same environment, where engineers works on calculations/design, technologist works on implementations.
4. That's because they generally don't credit you anything from a college engineering program to university engineering degree program.
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Nov 12, 2013
927 posts
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Iceland
pumedog wrote: Ben is wrong, you can get your P.Eng with a diploma. Since you don't meet the CEAB requirements they will assess your experience and have you write a bunch of technical exams to prove your competency, but it is possible. See this link: http://www.peo.on.ca/index.php/ci_id/2193/la_id/1.htm
Good luck passing those exams.
"Between my salary and the office supplies I pilfer, I'm making 6 figures."
Medicine1T4 wrote: oh that's just a username............... im in grade 12
Newbie
Jan 14, 2015
27 posts
2 upvotes
benjuotterly wrote: 4. That's because they generally don't credit you anything from a college engineering program to university engineering degree program.
I can't speak to any field but civil, so all I'll say is a number of colleges may have linking programs to local universities and lakehead. Ex: St Lawrence College in Kingston civil eng tech program has a transfer to both Queen's and Lakehead. Probably varies greatly from school to school.
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 10, 2015
36 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Ritchie257 wrote: I can't speak to any field but civil, so all I'll say is a number of colleges may have linking programs to local universities and lakehead. Ex: St Lawrence College in Kingston civil eng tech program has a transfer to both Queen's and Lakehead. Probably varies greatly from school to school.
Ok, thanks for the information!
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Nov 12, 2013
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ShatteredAwe wrote: Are the exams for becoming a P.Eng that hard?
No they are very easy actually, as they are on ethics instead of theory. I couldn't imagine having to repeat some of the work I did in university 5 years down the road for a test, thankfully I don't. But if you don't have a degree, they test not only on ethics, but also on what you should have learned in university.
"Between my salary and the office supplies I pilfer, I'm making 6 figures."
Medicine1T4 wrote: oh that's just a username............... im in grade 12
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 10, 2015
36 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Hydropwnics wrote: No they are very easy actually, as they are on ethics instead of theory. I couldn't imagine having to repeat some of the work I did in university 5 years down the road for a test, thankfully I don't. But if you don't have a degree, they test not only on ethics, but also on what you should have learned in university.
Oh, I see. If you don't mind me asking, since it's on stuff that I would have learned in University, does this mean I'm given an opportunity to be exposed to these things, or do they simply give me the test? Also thanks for answering my questions so far.
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 10, 2015
36 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Anonymouse wrote: It is perfectly reasonable to do a technology diploma and then upgrade to an engineering degree at Lakehead (for example). I know quite a few who have done that, and they are my favourite people to work with because they don't have outsized egos. Also, they don't look down on lowly techs.

For sure you should read the recent OSPE survey on underemployment among engineering graduates before you go into an engineering program. Most eng programs are no joke; you will really feel like you have a degree under your belt when you graduate. But it is a little questionable about whether it is worth the effort given that a substantial fraction of graduates work in jobs that don't even require a university degree, and most never get an engineering job at all.
I read the survey, and was sort of upset by it. Only 30% of those with Engineering Degrees even work in Engineering? That sounds a bit rough.
I'm not being put off Engineering, I mean I'm still interested in it, but does anyone know of similar jobs/degrees that might interest me if I like Engineering. Also, I found that Queen's University also allows Technologists to transfer into an Engineering program, which is cool! Thanks to everyone for you help so far!
Jr. Member
Jul 15, 2011
192 posts
30 upvotes
GTA
Hydropwnics wrote: Good luck passing those exams.
They're not really that difficult, IMO. I came from a physics background and found the equivalency exams to be pretty doable after studying through the related texts. An engineering tech should be more than prepared for those equivalency exams than someone who comes from a pure science background.

As for the OP, unless one is in civil or a specialization that deals largely with the public's safety, getting a P.eng is often an unnecessary credential. If you still insist on it though, I do personally know two techs who have the designation, so its definitely possible from what I've seen.
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Jan 10, 2007
1859 posts
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Woodbridge
Hydropwnics wrote: Good luck passing those exams.
If you are in engineering and understand the concepts, the exams are not hard themselves. Its just tedious and hard to study on your own. Pretty much anyone can take them if you want to pay for it.

There is nothing wrong with doing a technologist diploma and then a degree to get your p.eng. Nothing at all. As pointed out (and I agree) they make some of the best employee and coworkers out there. But it is a LONGER road. period.

If your end goal is to get your p.eng, to save time just get your degree first.

Or if you want to go to college, Conestoga has a caeb accredited engineering program! Best of both worlds.
http://www.conestogac.on.ca/fulltime/1066C.jsp#PO-ATP
I would be highly tempted to do that program if I was picking today.

If you don't have the grades for Uni Eng and need a catalyst(college technologist) before you get your degree, then you are in for a long road. Nothing wrong with it. Just keep that in mind.


As pointed out, in Ontario things are not easy for eng grads, unless you are a super star.
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Oct 26, 2003
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if you want easier time to get a career after you graduate, then go for engineering degree at a top university.
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 10, 2015
36 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Thanks for all of the replies guys. I guess the real reason why I'm asking this is because I"m a bit paranoid about starting Calculus next year (I'm a Grade 11 girl, if that helps you envision me?), and I was just looking at options. Now I'm just looking over if it would be worth it to go to University, or if I should go the long, Diploma route. Especially considering the Ontario Employment rate. I didn't know things were that bad.

Would you guys happen to know of, personally, any other sectors in Ontario that are in actual high demand? I'm not sure where I'd go to find information on that.
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Nov 8, 2013
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Mecca
If you find something is in high demand, it won't be by the time you graduate, especially not in Ontario. I can't say there are any undergrad programs that are in high demand.
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Feb 16, 2010
1088 posts
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WAIT.. UR A GIRL?

U have hit a jackpot.

Girls have special quota in big firms. Where average engineering guy can't even get interview. U will get hired because ur a girl.


In my engineering career i have meet, laid off jobless guys.... but never a jobless chick engineer. They always stay. And since ur a chick all guys will hover around u at work. U will get great reviews because everyone will like you

Engineering is best option for you.
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Oct 16, 2007
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ShatteredAwe wrote: Thanks for all of the replies guys. I guess the real reason why I'm asking this is because I"m a bit paranoid about starting Calculus next year (I'm a Grade 11 girl, if that helps you envision me?), and I was just looking at options. Now I'm just looking over if it would be worth it to go to University, or if I should go the long, Diploma route. Especially considering the Ontario Employment rate. I didn't know things were that bad.

Would you guys happen to know of, personally, any other sectors in Ontario that are in actual high demand? I'm not sure where I'd go to find information on that.
If you want to be an engineer, work hard, do your best and goto university. It is not worth going to college and then trying for your P.Eng. I know because that's the situation I am in now. I did the technologist program at a college. I then did the B.Tech degree at mac. Now I am studying for my PEO exams. It took me 3 years of college, plus 4 years of part time mac, plus 1-2 years with PEO exams to get me to the same spot as a 4 year university degree. I think an engineer has a larger scope of work when it comes to jobs. Don't worry about the employment rate. The situation now is going to be completely different than the situation in 6 years. Focus on a good program (avoid chemical engineering), and you'll be fine.
[OP]
Newbie
Mar 10, 2015
36 posts
6 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
ziaa wrote: If you want to be an engineer, work hard, do your best and goto university. It is not worth going to college and then trying for your P.Eng. I know because that's the situation I am in now. I did the technologist program at a college. I then did the B.Tech degree at mac. Now I am studying for my PEO exams. It took me 3 years of college, plus 4 years of part time mac, plus 1-2 years with PEO exams to get me to the same spot as a 4 year university degree. I think an engineer has a larger scope of work when it comes to jobs. Don't worry about the employment rate. The situation now is going to be completely different than the situation in 6 years. Focus on a good program (avoid chemical engineering), and you'll be fine.
I'm quoting you right now, but Thanks to everyone who's answered my questions so far! You're all giving me a realistic expectation for the workforce in the future.
In particular about your post... why should I avoid Chemical Engineering? Is there something definitely bad about it compared to other disciplines? (Personally now I'm thinking of going into Electrical Engineering)
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Oct 26, 2003
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ShatteredAwe wrote: Thanks for all of the replies guys. I guess the real reason why I'm asking this is because I"m a bit paranoid about starting Calculus next year (I'm a Grade 11 girl, if that helps you envision me?), and I was just looking at options. Now I'm just looking over if it would be worth it to go to University, or if I should go the long, Diploma route. Especially considering the Ontario Employment rate. I didn't know things were that bad.

Would you guys happen to know of, personally, any other sectors in Ontario that are in actual high demand? I'm not sure where I'd go to find information on that.
can't envision, I need photo

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