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Engineering member dues is tax refundable?

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 18th, 2020 12:57 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
User avatar
Oct 15, 2006
152 posts
20 upvotes
Alberta

Engineering member dues is tax refundable?

Hello,

If the company will not pay for the engineering membership practise dues (APEGA dues), can I still pay for it to keep my license and request a refund of annual engineering membership fees in my tax return while I am a full-time employee? And which line is that?

Thank you.
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12 replies
Deal Addict
Mar 3, 2018
1972 posts
1970 upvotes
GTA
Claim on Line 21200 in your tax return. Not a full refund but you will get back a percentage equal to your marginal tax rate.
Deal Expert
Feb 24, 2007
15064 posts
2645 upvotes
Was the condition of your employment to hold a P.Eng?
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
1496 posts
1264 upvotes
Ottawa
eldiablo wrote: Was the condition of your employment to hold a P.Eng?
Legally, to call oneself an Engineer one needs to be registered with the professional engineering regulatory body in the jurisdiction of practice.

I realize that many businesses don't follow that and give out engineering titles to non-Engineeers or to those who have an engineering degree but aren't registered, but that's not technically legal.

If OP has a title of "engineer", then registration is required, whether the job requires a stamp or not.
Deal Addict
Aug 15, 2010
1949 posts
385 upvotes
Dynatos wrote: Legally, to call oneself an Engineer one needs to be registered with the professional engineering regulatory body in the jurisdiction of practice.

I realize that many businesses don't follow that and give out engineering titles to non-Engineeers or to those who have an engineering degree but aren't registered, but that's not technically legal.

If OP has a title of "engineer", then registration is required, whether the job requires a stamp or not.
Chill, it's a job title put on the OP by the company. Engineer is a restricted title in Canada but it's not enforced unless you're doing Professional Engineering work while not being registered or in a public facing role calling yourself an engineer, which could lead to confusion in the public eye.

Honestly I'm surprised your company wouldn't pay your fees though if they require a P.Eng. Every place I've worked that required my stamp paid my dues.
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Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
1496 posts
1264 upvotes
Ottawa
sixteen12 wrote: Chill, it's a job title put on the OP by the company. Engineer is a restricted title in Canada but it's not enforced unless you're doing Professional Engineering work while not being registered or in a public facing role calling yourself an engineer, which could lead to confusion in the public eye.

Honestly I'm surprised your company wouldn't pay your fees though if they require a P.Eng. Every place I've worked that required my stamp paid my dues.
I'm chill, thanks.

My point was that, for tax purposes, if the employee is being called an Engineer then it's a pretty easy argument to the CRA that registration is a job requirement.
Deal Addict
Feb 20, 2008
2512 posts
490 upvotes
What kind of employer doesn't pay for their employees' licences???
Penalty Box
Jun 24, 2015
4715 posts
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nurses, lawyers, pleanty of trades people have a regulatory body too
Hi
Member
Oct 28, 2013
396 posts
330 upvotes
Toronto
Phlegmbot wrote: What kind of employer doesn't pay for their employees' licences???
My company doesn't. At one point a few years ago we were required to obtain a P. Eng license (and they did not pay for the annual fee) but they're not as firm on that these days. If we don't have a P. Eng, we have to put "Electrical Engineering" instead of "Electrical Engineer" on any documentation.
Deal Addict
Feb 20, 2008
2512 posts
490 upvotes
queentasha wrote: My company doesn't. At one point a few years ago we were required to obtain a P. Eng license (and they did not pay for the annual fee) but they're not as firm on that these days. If we don't have a P. Eng, we have to put "Electrical Engineering" instead of "Electrical Engineer" on any documentation.
If you're in Ontario, you could be violating the Act. Your title is irrelevant. What matters is the work you do. See section 12. If you're in violation, please take the appropriate steps.
Deal Addict
Feb 20, 2008
2512 posts
490 upvotes
queentasha wrote: My company doesn't. At one point a few years ago we were required to obtain a P. Eng license (and they did not pay for the annual fee) but they're not as firm on that these days. If we don't have a P. Eng, we have to put "Electrical Engineering" instead of "Electrical Engineer" on any documentation.
Also you need a new job. Any employer that doesn't pay for their employees' licences does not value you or your work.
Member
Oct 28, 2013
396 posts
330 upvotes
Toronto
Phlegmbot wrote: If you're in Ontario, you could be violating the Act. Your title is irrelevant. What matters is the work you do. See section 12. If you're in violation, please take the appropriate steps.
What do you mean? I do have my P. Eng license so I don't believe I'm in violation of section 12. I am very careful about what I put my name on.
Deal Addict
Dec 20, 2018
4932 posts
3984 upvotes
Phlegmbot wrote: What kind of employer doesn't pay for their employees' licences???
Most companies dont or roles that don't require it.

Even for roles that requires a license/registration like nurses and teachers etc having to pay their own annual licensing fee

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