Health & Wellness

entire back of heel (not under heal) up and down Achilles and also the bone back there in pain even walking

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 17th, 2023 11:49 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 11, 2007
3811 posts
668 upvotes
Mississauga

entire back of heel (not under heal) up and down Achilles and also the bone back there in pain even walking

I did go to my doctor and will be coming back next week for a follow up. his only advice so far is to get orthopedic soles and pain should go away.

Even without shoes for multiple days now the pain isnt going away like in the past. Wondered if anyone had any further advice outside of going back. how to deal with the pain itself, and some longer term plans.

This pic is reflective of where the pain is for sure.
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6 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2017
1817 posts
1859 upvotes
You most likely have achilles tendinitis at the insertion point or it could be a bone chip. Did the doctor order X-ray and ultrasound? If not you should him/her to do that. Does your pain vary during the day? For example, it’s worse in the morning and then becomes less during the day as you walk around. Do you play any sports?
Deal Addict
Oct 3, 2013
2566 posts
3911 upvotes
West
ProductGuy wrote: You most likely have achilles tendinitis at the insertion point or it could be a bone chip. Did the doctor order X-ray and ultrasound? If not you should him/her to do that. Does your pain vary during the day? For example, it’s worse in the morning and then becomes less during the day as you walk around. Do you play any sports?
Generally there is no need for x-ray or US at this stage unless there was some overt trauma or concern for a massive tear. Doesn't change management one bit and is generally a waste of resources. Even if there was a bone spur (Haglund deformity), one would treat this conservatively as well for now, since this is usually an incidental finding. Usually, these injuries are just from overuse - has OP done anything more than normal lately from a physical activity point of view?

Insoles MAY help to reduce the stress on the Achilles tendon if one has a very abnormal arch, but are unlikely to do an awful lot on their own. You shouldn't be walking without shoes - who told you that? If anything, you should be walking with shoes 24/7. Logically speaking, if you are getting insoles to help your arch to offload the Achilles, why walk around without shoes and provide your arch with zero support in-between?


Copying and pasting from another RFD thread some general advice:
Classic symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy - go see a physiotherapist for confirming the diagnosis and starting treatment. Essentially your tendon is not able to repair fast enough to keep up with the load you're putting through it.

...

You need a combination of rest, exercises to perform in the morning, stretches, and an eccentric strength training program to help your tendon repair properly. They can also help with some taping and treatments to give you symptomatic relief (i.e. IMS).

Your doctor can also assess and consider advising you regarding the use of topical anti-inflammatories to help with symptoms/healing as well.

Try to do it before it really develops into something more serious. If left too long (6 months is already quite long), it can cause your tendon to degenerate, which will greatly prolong the healing time.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2015
7439 posts
2382 upvotes
0 downvotes
some kind of Planter Fashitis or some heel spur defect. you need those inserts in your shoes
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PEACE is the answer!
Deal Addict
Dec 14, 2011
1901 posts
1066 upvotes
London
1. Calf stretching
2. Roll tennis ball (myofascial ball is better) on bottom of foot.
3. Ice the area as well as rolling frozen water bottle on bottom of foot
4. Orthotics (if you have insurance, get them before the end of the year (if your plan tenews in January), the you may be able to get another pair next year (if you have appropriate coverage)).

You did not mention the mechanism of injury, your daily activities (work, sports etc), previous injuries, unilater/bilateral, knee, hip, low back issues?

Good luck, this could take months to resolve.
Deal Addict
Nov 16, 2008
3019 posts
1085 upvotes
dude hasn't replied so maybe the pain hasn't allowed him to walk to his PC? lol...in all honesty this pain is likely killer
Newbie
Aug 20, 2010
9 posts
7 upvotes
North york
Hey OP, this location is classic to Achilles tendinitis/tendinopathy. It could also be a heel spur pushing into the plantar fascia (base of foot) or one pushing up into the Achilles tendon (back of heel). An ultrasound would be helpful but I hear enough of this from my patients that it’s easy to figure out. Some of the treatment plans include: pain modulation techniques such as laser therapy, soft tissue therapy, acupuncture, stretching of the calf and loading of the Achilles tendon to promote healing. Orthotics can help but aren’t the end all be all. I find when done properly it can take the edge off. If you have hard wood and tile at home I would suggest indoor slippers with cushioning to provide some minor relief from direct pressure of the hard surface. I am a clinician in the GTA who does treatment for musculoskeletal conditions and I make orthotics as well. Feel free to DM, I understand how annoying heel pain is as I myself am recovering from an Achilles tendinitis from tennis. All the best!

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