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Locked: Everything Trump - Donald Trump General Discussion thread

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mypepsi wrote:
Mar 4th, 2017 8:36 pm
Not too sure if Obama can defend himself on this one. Obama is not offering any evidence to support his claim that he did not wiretap Trump. Trump has SECRET CLASSIFIED access to documents that we don't have and he can't reveal to us. If Obama did wiretap Trump, that will be a new low for him.
As a general rule, the onus is on the accuser to prove that the person did it, not the other way around. In this case, making the accusation without providing any supporting evidence was poorly thought out.
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The Trump tweets about "Obama" wiretapping him are actually damning against Trump, not Obama. They corroborate earlier reports that a federal wiretapping warrant was obtained against people with Russian connections involved in the Trump campaign.

A President can't just wiretap someone on a whim; they're not judge, jury, and executioner. Trump appears to be disclosing that a federal judge signed a wiretap warrant for Trump or his associates, meaning there was sufficient evidence that a serious crime was occurring. That occurring during the Obama administration doesn't mean "Obama wiretapped Trump," though it's cute they're trying to play it that way.
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teamocil wrote:
Mar 2nd, 2017 1:24 pm
Also it is not that hard to become a US citizen. If you have a clean record and a job or potential employment in the US then why not just apply to be a citizen? The big issue some illegals have is that they have a criminal past/record and would be denied if they applied, so they come over illegally to avoid prosecution. You can't just show up in a country and expect them to take you in as one of their own without a bit of scrutiny, and circumventing the law does not justify your right to stay in that country. If you respect the country you one day want to live in you will follow their laws, if you'd prefer to pick and choose which laws to follow then they probably would prefer if you weren't there.
It's not that simple though. Many refugees and immigrants land on these borders, burn all their identifying paperwork, make up an identity and a country of origin, and leave it up to the US or Canadian government to prove otherwise. In these cases we can't simply take their word. Some dark-skinned person with a thick accent landing in Canada can just say, "I come from the USA". So do we deport them to the US? Then the US says, "We have no idea who this person is".. So they kick the problem back to us.

It's not just as easy as saying, 'we'll just deport people'. And personally I don't think jail is the answer, if for no other reason than it's much less expensive to let the person try to establish themselves like our parents, grandparents and great grandparents did.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

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Trump knows they caught him and he's just throwing stuff out to try to cover himself. This could be the reason why he's trying to fill his cabinet with those that also dealt with Russia.
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The president doesn't order wiretaps. That comes from the Justice department, and even then, only when there is reasonable cause. Trump is going on the attack, like he always does, to distract from the actual issues, and more than likely, he is guilty of something or other. We just have to wait and see.

https://www.wired.com/2017/03/feds-wire ... ama-worry/
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mypepsi wrote:
Mar 4th, 2017 8:36 pm
Not too sure if Obama can defend himself on this one. Obama is not offering any evidence to support his claim that he did not wiretap Trump. Trump has SECRET CLASSIFIED access to documents that we don't have and he can't reveal to us. If Obama did wiretap Trump, that will be a new low for him.
Sir, you have no idea what you are talking about. Trump does not have any secret or classified information. His tweets were in response to an article in the Breitbart website, which itself is 80% inaccurate!!


Topher wrote:
Mar 5th, 2017 8:56 am
The president doesn't order wiretaps. That comes from the Justice department, and even then, only when there is reasonable cause. Trump is going on the attack, like he always does, to distract from the actual issues, and more than likely, he is guilty of something or other. We just have to wait and see.

https://www.wired.com/2017/03/feds-wire ... ama-worry/
Thank you! It is as simple as that, the POTUS does not order wiretaps. And it is not like ordering a pizza either.

  1. What we know is that there were FISA warrant(s) granted to conduct the wiretaps (including electronic communications from / to a server in Trump Tower).
  2. FISA is the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Presumably, the wiretaps are part of the ongoing investigation of the Russia hacking campaign.
  3. The wiretaps were 100% legal, and did not target a specif person. Trump wants his followers to think that he was the target.
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Archanfel wrote:
Mar 4th, 2017 8:58 pm
Can you offer any evidence that you are not a rapist? If not, does that mean you are?

It's up to the accuser to provide evidences. Not that it matters in this case. Trump supporters will believe whatever they want to believe and Trump doesn't really care about anybody else's opinion.

Mind you, I have no doubt some of Trump's people were under some sort of surveillance. A lot of people in the US are, especially if they deal with foreign powers.
100% correct. Obama does not have to provide any evidence of anything.

Example: Obama could sue Trump for libel, and the only party forced to provide evidence in court would be Trump (he would have to provide proof that the accusations that he tweeted are true). The accuser provides evidence...
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Aug 26, 2001
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mypepsi wrote:
Mar 4th, 2017 8:36 pm
Not too sure if Obama can defend himself on this one. Obama is not offering any evidence to support his claim that he did not wiretap Trump. Trump has SECRET CLASSIFIED access to documents that we don't have and he can't reveal to us. If Obama did wiretap Trump, that will be a new low for him.
^ another great example of the amazing lack of reasoning skills of the "alt-right". Wonder when the Alt-Right RFD Defense Brigade will come into this thread to defend this poster? :D
Last edited by konfusion666 on Mar 5th, 2017 10:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Trump enlists Congress, ex-intel chief denies wiretapping
http://www.mykawartha.com/news-story/71 ... retapping/
PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Donald Trump turned to Congress on Sunday for help finding evidence to support his unsubstantiated claim that former President Barack Obama had Trump's telephones tapped during the election. Obama's intelligence chief said no such action was ever carried out.

Republican leaders of Congress appeared willing to honour the president's request, but the move has potential risks for the president, particularly if the House and Senate intelligence committees unearth damaging information about Trump, his aides or his associates.
Risky move by Drumpf...
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Spending money at a Trump property “is about personally enriching Donald Trump, who happens to be the president of the United States.” Winking Face

Trump hotel becomes centre of political universe
Trump hotel may be political capital of the nation’s capital: At a circular booth in the middle of the Trump International Hotel’s balcony restaurant, President Donald Trump dined on his steak — well-done, with ketchup — while chatting up British Brexit politician Nigel Farage. A few days later, major Republican donors Doug Deason and Doug Manchester, in town for the president’s address to Congress, sipped coffee at the hotel with Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif. After Trump’s speech, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin returned to his Washington residence — the hotel — and strode past the gigantic American flag in the soaring lobby. With his tiny terrier tucked under an arm, Mnuchin stepped into an elevator with reality TV star and hotel guest Dog the Bounty Hunter, who particularly enjoyed the Trump-stamped chocolates in his room.

It’s just another week at the new political capital of the nation’s capital. The $200 million hotel inside the federally owned Old Post Office building has become the place to see, be seen, drink, network — even live — for the still-emerging Trump set. It’s a rich environment for lobbyists and anyone hoping to rub elbows with Trump-related politicos — despite a veil of ethics questions that hangs overhead. “I’ve never come through this lobby and not seen someone I know,” says Deason, a Dallas-based fundraiser for Trump’s election campaign. For Republican Party players, it’s the only place to stay. “I can tell you this hotel will be the most successful hotel in Washington, D.C.,” says Manchester, adding that he would know because he has developed the second-largest Marriott and second-largest Hyatt in the world. Manchester says Trump’s hotel will attract people based on its location near the White House and Congress, the quality renovation and the management team. Although Trump says he is not involved in the day-to-day operations of his businesses, he retains a financial interest in them. A stay at the hotel gives someone trying to win over Trump on a policy issue or political decision a potential chit. That’s what concerns ethics lawyers who had wanted Trump to sell off his companies as previous presidents have done. “President Trump is in effect inviting people and companies and countries to channel money to him through the hotel,” said Kathleen Clark, a former ethics lawyer for the District of Columbia and a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis. She said the “pay to play” danger is even greater than it would be if people wanted to donate to a campaign to influence a politician’s thinking. Spending money at a Trump property “is about personally enriching Donald Trump, who happens to be the president of the United States.”
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After Clapper, Comey:

Comey Asks Justice Dept. to Reject Trump’s Wiretapping Claim
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/05/us/p ... hones.html



Image

The Tweeter-in-Chief is like an addict, and he can't give up the crap news that confirms his conspiracy theories.
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'This conflict is disturbing and his failure to completely step away from his business raises questions about his White House actions,'' said Scott Amey, general counsel for the Project on Government Oversight

Critics say Trump water rule helps his golf links
https://ca.sports.yahoo.com/news/teed-o ... --spt.html
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) -- President Donald Trump's recent executive order calling for a review of a rule protecting small bodies of water from pollution and development is strongly supported by golf course owners who are wary of being forced into expensive cleanups on their fairways.

It just so happens that Trump's business holdings include a dozen golf courses in the United States, and critics say his executive order is par for the course: yet another unseemly conflict of interest that would result in a benefit to Trump properties if it goes through.

''This conflict is disturbing and his failure to completely step away from his business raises questions about his White House actions,'' said Scott Amey, general counsel for the Project on Government Oversight.
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@JustBob Face With Tears Of Joy that's funny

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