Shopping Discussion

Is it expensive to buy products with the intent of collecting high PC Optimum points?

  • Last Updated:
  • May 4th, 2021 11:03 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 2, 2013
1881 posts
3733 upvotes
union station, TO

Is it expensive to buy products with the intent of collecting high PC Optimum points?

do you think that buying products with the intent on receiving high PC Optimum points takes a major hit on your wallet? the products that you do need like vegetables and fruit and meat receive small pc points (most times zero pc points) per purchase. the products that you don't need like junk chips and junk cookies are advertised as receiving 1000 points. you still spend a lot of money at loblaws or no frills to chase 10,000 to 30,000 points. in the end, you're just spending more than you normally do just to chase those points.

for instance, on my personal page, i received an offer of 100 points for $1 spent on oranges. compare that to the recent loblaws flyer, there's a 1500 points offer if you buy 2 hershey chocolate bars (in other words, spend $8 total receive 1500 points). people who chase points will be spending money on those chocolate bars that they don't really need. that can be expensive
Last edited by oicthat2013 on May 5th, 2021 1:18 am, edited 2 times in total.
6 replies
Deal Expert
Jun 30, 2006
19290 posts
7444 upvotes
Toronto
You use the points for things you would buy anyways. Why would you chase points for things you don't need unless the item is free or close to it?
Deal Guru
Nov 15, 2008
10278 posts
4732 upvotes
The key to earning points is to align a sale on something you normally buy with an offer, then stock up to multiply your earnings. Then you are keeping extra inventory of food in your house (& also risk spoilage) or have added costs like a chest freezer/electricity to store it. Your cost per use is lower, but your overall grocery bill is higher & you need that infrastructure like the freezer & a car. There is a cost in time because you have to keep on top of your offers, the flyers, perhaps drive around to several stores, & manage the food in your house well.

If you are a homemaker or senior citizen with time & extra money to invest in food it all might work out well for you.

My main complaint is that there are too many offers for PC/No Name foods & they are not my favourite store brands. Also there are no offers on imported foods (& little selection).
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
17848 posts
15296 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
carmaster wrote: You use the points for things you would buy anyways. Why would you chase points for things you don't need unless the item is free or close to it?
This

Quite frankly you are doing the PC Optimum Program all wrong based on how you define the program in your OP ... and the whole concept of “chasing points”

In your scenario ... the program is baiting & controlling you

Versus you taking charge and being in the driver seat and finding ways to take control of the program to meet your needs ... and earn on things you actually buy, need and want

My best suggestion ...

Tune into the RFD PCO MegaThread and READ along or join in the convo you’ll learn a lot

pc-optimum-discussion-thread-2021-2436833/

The average gain PCO says is about 5% to 10% back in points annually ...

Whereas there are RFDers playing the points game to their advantage ... making back a lot more than that annually. Many at 15% to 20% - Some at 25% to 35% - and a select few who see 35% to 50% +

Before Covid, our house was definitely in the 35% + range ... not so much now cuz of us having to change our shopping habits (less in person shopping - more curbside pick ups - fewer trips overall). So consequently, we have missed out on a lot of good deals this past year and STACKING OPPORTUNITIES ... but we still are doing better than the average collector.
Moderator
May 28, 2012
11416 posts
3715 upvotes
Saskatoon
I buy what I buy, if there are points, good and if it's something I use regularly then I might buy an extra one or two to qualify for the offer. I also hold over offers if I don't need something right away and know it goes on sale on a regular basis.
Newbie
May 9, 2019
40 posts
12 upvotes
Montreal, QC
Many retailers offering loyalty program promote their sales like "buy this and receive X points", in order to try making people spend more money with them, and obviously get more sales, and thus income. So it's expected some consumers will buy something they don't really need at (expensive) price, but they will have the impression of gaining something in return. OP described quite well this psychological trap. But the real winners are retailer$.
Deal Expert
Jun 30, 2006
19290 posts
7444 upvotes
Toronto
Not sure any RFD is chasing points and buying expensive items for that. Quite the opposite, probably price matching and then using the points offer.

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