Parenting & Family

Extra Supplement Resources for virtual schooling

[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 31, 2007
4581 posts
1062 upvotes
Richmond Hill

Extra Supplement Resources for virtual schooling

Where is everyone getting their supplementary resources (worksheets, reading, writing, math, etc) from (for those of you with children in virtual schooling)? Looking for elementary school material.

K5?
Chapters?
Amazon?

TIA
4 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3419 posts
1211 upvotes
Woodbridge
I haven't updated this in some time, and many of the tools that were offered for free during the spring school closure period have gone back to the regularly paid subscriptions, but this thread might be a start - academic-resources-during-school-closure-2362927/

Ask your child's teacher if they have district-wide or school access to things like Raz-Kids or Epic for reading.

Khan Academy is a free resource for math, language and more. It can be somewhat cumbersome to use but it's free and you can sign up as a parent to monitor and guide your child's learning.

You can sign up as "Not a Teacher" or "Homeschooler" at https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/ and filter results by free to find worksheets, lesson plans etc. for a variety of subjects.

Here are some sites that some teacher use to look for worksheets:
https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/ ... eracy.html
https://www.k5learning.com/reading-comp ... worksheets
https://www.k12reader.com/subject/composition/
https://www.math-drills.com/
https://www.math-aids.com/

A better idea for math would be to look through the University of Waterloo's Centre for Education in Mathematics and Computing (CEMC) Problem of the Week archives - https://www.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/resources/potw.php. The problems come in five levels that range from Grade 3/4 to Grade 11/12. For older elementary students, the CEMC Courseware offers hundreds of lessons that cover the 7-12 math curriculum - https://cemc.uwaterloo.ca/resources/cou ... eware.html

There are some YouTube channels that feature authors reading books to younger children. Here's one that comes to mind:
https://www.youtube.com/c/StorylineOnlineSAF/videos

I can try to be more specific if you tell me the grade level(s) you're looking for and what exactly you want these resources to supplement. Some resources help kids mimic procedures to find answers, some resources encourage kids to think and problem solve, others get them moving, others get them talking. Some resources are clearly connected to specific curriculum expectations, others help develop more general overall expectations, while others set curriculum aside altogether for some other goal. To choose the most effective resources and to avoid them simply becoming "busy work" that a kid does just for the sake of it, you should really think about the purpose for these supplemental materials. What are you trying to supplement? Why? To what end?
Sr. Member
Dec 12, 2005
598 posts
121 upvotes
Richmond
Khan for math and ebooks from pubic/ school library. During the summer, I make him do the Canadian curriculum for the next grade.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Dec 31, 2007
4581 posts
1062 upvotes
Richmond Hill
OntEdTchr wrote: I haven't updated this in some time, and many of the tools that were offered for free during the spring school closure period have gone back to the regularly paid subscriptions, but this thread might be a start - academic-resources-during-school-closure-2362927/

Ask your child's teacher if they have district-wide or school access to things like Raz-Kids or Epic for reading.

Khan Academy is a free resource for math, language and more. It can be somewhat cumbersome to use but it's free and you can sign up as a parent to monitor and guide your child's learning.

You can sign up as "Not a Teacher" or "Homeschooler" at https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/ and filter results by free to find worksheets, lesson plans etc. for a variety of subjects.

Here are some sites that some teacher use to look for worksheets:
https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/ ... eracy.html
https://www.k5learning.com/reading-comp ... worksheets
https://www.k12reader.com/subject/composition/
https://www.math-drills.com/
https://www.math-aids.com/

A better idea for math would be to look through the University of Waterloo's Centre for Education in Mathematics and Computing (CEMC) Problem of the Week archives - https://www.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/resources/potw.php. The problems come in five levels that range from Grade 3/4 to Grade 11/12. For older elementary students, the CEMC Courseware offers hundreds of lessons that cover the 7-12 math curriculum - https://cemc.uwaterloo.ca/resources/cou ... eware.html

There are some YouTube channels that feature authors reading books to younger children. Here's one that comes to mind:
https://www.youtube.com/c/StorylineOnlineSAF/videos

I can try to be more specific if you tell me the grade level(s) you're looking for and what exactly you want these resources to supplement. Some resources help kids mimic procedures to find answers, some resources encourage kids to think and problem solve, others get them moving, others get them talking. Some resources are clearly connected to specific curriculum expectations, others help develop more general overall expectations, while others set curriculum aside altogether for some other goal. To choose the most effective resources and to avoid them simply becoming "busy work" that a kid does just for the sake of it, you should really think about the purpose for these supplemental materials. What are you trying to supplement? Why? To what end?
Thanks for a very detailed response. Will take some time to digest.

I'm looking for gr 1 materials to supplement and help with the reading and spelling areas. Sounding out words (especially new never seen words).
Member
Feb 13, 2017
297 posts
128 upvotes
Mississauga
Sight words cards.
Curriculum books.


enwhyRFD wrote: Thanks for a very detailed response. Will take some time to digest.

I'm looking for gr 1 materials to supplement and help with the reading and spelling areas. Sounding out words (especially new never seen words).

Top