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Extracting Sheared 100 Year Old Pipe out of Radiator (Cast Iron)

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  • Aug 10th, 2018 6:16 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 4, 2007
63 posts
1 upvote
Toronto

Extracting Sheared 100 Year Old Pipe out of Radiator (Cast Iron)

Hi everyone,

I am in the process of restoring an old radiator that I found in between the walls of a 100 year old building. Unfortunately when the contractor went to go and unbolt it from the wall, he under estimated how heavy it was and it fell on to the floor shearing all the pipes connected to it. I have been able to extract all of the sheared pipes except this one - it's proving to be really difficult as I have tried everything I can think of. The sheared pipe screws into the unit and I tried lubricating it with every imaginable spray (Rust Check, Jig-a-loo, etc) but nothing seems to be loosening it and I do not want to heat up the fitting as I really do not want the lubricants to ignite. I have attached a picture of what I am working with here. If you look in the centre of the reducer, you'll see the sheared pipe that I am trying to unscrew out of it.

If anybody can offer any advice, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks everybody!!
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7 replies
Member
Jul 14, 2012
311 posts
120 upvotes
Hamilton
thegame27 wrote: Hi everyone,

I am in the process of restoring an old radiator that I found in between the walls of a 100 year old building. Unfortunately when the contractor went to go and unbolt it from the wall, he under estimated how heavy it was and it fell on to the floor shearing all the pipes connected to it. I have been able to extract all of the sheared pipes except this one - it's proving to be really difficult as I have tried everything I can think of. The sheared pipe screws into the unit and I tried lubricating it with every imaginable spray (Rust Check, Jig-a-loo, etc) but nothing seems to be loosening it and I do not want to heat up the fitting as I really do not want the lubricants to ignite. I have attached a picture of what I am working with here. If you look in the centre of the reducer, you'll see the sheared pipe that I am trying to unscrew out of it.

If anybody can offer any advice, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks everybody!!
Fairly sure that's a threaded union type connection, not a reducer. Should be able to turn the nut and take the whole piece off.
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Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3798 posts
1805 upvotes
Will be much easier to remove the larger reducing bushing which the broken piece is screwed into and replace both pieces.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 4, 2007
63 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
Hi everyone, thanks a million for your advice.
I have tried to remove the reducer but it’s ceased on to the unit pretty well. I used a pretty strong wrench to get it off but it’s not happening. Slightly Frowning Face
I guess I may have to heat it up and do it carefully but I’d rather not.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 23, 2004
2076 posts
579 upvotes
Montreal
Heat it with a torch. Throw some water on it. Unscrew with a large wrench with good leverage.
The products you used will not ignite. Most of them are probably quite volatile.
Deal Addict
Mar 14, 2004
3049 posts
420 upvotes
North Etobicoke
Spray some brake fluid on it, that's works as a penetrating oil. You can take a hacksaw blade put a rag on it and cut a line on the ID of the pipe almost reaching the threads, then use a chisel to bend it inwards. If that does not work, take off the big reducing nut.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 4, 2007
63 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
I love all these ideas!! My dad is a mechanic so there’s no shortage of brake fluid. Thank you everyone for these suggestions Slightly Smiling Face

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