Expired Hot Deals

Fanatical.com

International Day of the Programmer Bundle Giveaway - 3 eBooks (reg $87.97) now FREE

[OP]
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 16, 2010
7089 posts
4364 upvotes
Between Countries

International Day of the Programmer Bundle Giveaway - 3 eBooks (reg $87.97) now FREE

Deal Link:
Price:
FREE
Savings:
100% off
Retailer:
Fanatical.com
Fanatical.com
International Day of the Programmer Bundle Giveaway - 3 eBooks (reg $87.97) now FREE
https://www.fanatical.com/en/bundle/int ... e-giveaway
.
Fanatical.PNG
.
About this Bundle
Programmers, rejoice! Celebrate your special day with some free goodies in our new International Day of the Programmer Bundle Giveaway.

This annual event is held on the 256th day of the year - and a computer Byte can store 256 values - so in the programmers' world, it’s a very special number... hence the very special occasion!

As part of the celebration, we’re offering a free bundle of three programming eBooks to you, our wonderful Fanatical customers. There’s no minimum spend - just a free gift from us to you to say ‘good job, veteran programmers and wannabe programmers’.

WHAT’S INCLUDED
Developers, engineers, data scientists, and hobbyists everywhere lean towards Python as their go-to programming language, and with the Modern Python Cookbook - Second Edition, you will too. From beginners just starting out to those at intermediate or expert level, you'll not only learn Python programming concepts but also how to build complex applications too.

Continue your Python learning with Mastering Assembly Programming, an easy-to-follow guide that will help you understand testing, web services, configuration, and application integration through handy tips and tricks. You will be armed with the knowledge of how to create applications with flexible logging, powerful configuration, command-line options, automated unit tests, and good documentation.

Finally, if you’ve ever been tempted to build your own website from scratch - or need to brush up on your skills in order to make everything run smoothly - The PHP Workshop is here to help. You will learn how to write, execute, and troubleshoot your first PHP script using a built-in templating engine and server. Next, you'll learn about variables and data types, and see how conditions and loops help control the flow of a PHP program.

No matter your skill level or experience, find the confidence to expand your knowledge and improve with the International Day of the Programmer Bundle Giveaway - be quick as it won’t be around for long!
21 replies
Member
Dec 27, 2017
276 posts
270 upvotes
Ughh. I'm having PTSD from trying to learn assembly. but meh add this to the stack of udemy courses...
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2004
4289 posts
1744 upvotes
Toronto
jgaleazza wrote: Ughh. I'm having PTSD from trying to learn assembly. but meh add this to the stack of udemy courses...
Why are you learning assembly language?

Assembly languages are now a very small niche. But I do think that it is useful to know what your higher-level code turns into.
Deal Addict
Dec 24, 2008
3865 posts
1344 upvotes
Belle River
jgaleazza wrote: Ughh. I'm having PTSD from trying to learn assembly. but meh add this to the stack of udemy courses...
Hardcore :)
Deal Addict
Jul 31, 2007
1083 posts
973 upvotes
Hugh wrote: Why are you learning assembly language?

Assembly languages are now a very small niche. But I do think that it is useful to know what your higher-level code turns into.
its a mandatory course in compsci lol
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2004
4289 posts
1744 upvotes
Toronto
johncraven wrote: its a mandatory course in compsci lol
Where is this mandatory?

Where does it fit in the course sequence?

I presume that the course specfiies an appropriate text or other resources.

A whole mandatory course on assembly seems excessive. (An optional course on computer architecture would make sense.)
Member
Dec 21, 2012
415 posts
743 upvotes
Kitchener, ON
Hugh wrote: Where is this mandatory?

Where does it fit in the course sequence?

I presume that the course specfiies an appropriate text or other resources.

A whole mandatory course on assembly seems excessive. (An optional course on computer architecture would make sense.)
We had an assembly course using Motorola 68000s in 2nd year. Even had to hand encode the instruction sets to machine, as an exercise.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2004
4289 posts
1744 upvotes
Toronto
whoace wrote: We had an assembly course using Motorola 68000s in 2nd year. Even had to hand encode the instruction sets to machine, as an exercise.
Where?

If at University of Waterloo, that surprises me. A component of a course, sure. I taught a little bit of assembly in the Real Time course (four decades ago!) but it was a very minor portion. In the compilers course, you'd need to know about the target, but there is no way that that would be a dominant part of the course.

The only course in the Waterloo CS calendar that mentions assembler is CS241 "the foundations of sequential programs". Assembly language appears to be a minor part of it. Machine architecture and machine language appear to be more core.

mc68000 disappeared quite long ago. The last variant I remember was the ColdFire. The last mainstream computer with a 68k was probably introduced three decades ago. It's not even a good "toy" architecture to teach -- too complicated.

Current architectures that might be worth teaching: ARM, RISC-V, X86-64. Historical architectures that make good toys: PDP-8 (very simple!), PDP-11 (an inspiration for almost all subsequent architectures). Little microcontrollers such as various Arduino and ESP32 systems would be fun but even they are mostly programmed in C++ and Python these days.
Last edited by Hugh on Sep 19th, 2021 4:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4743 posts
2003 upvotes
WFH
Hugh wrote: Were?
This is probably more common than you realise. My kid graduated this year and had a mandatory assembly course based around the 68000 in 1st year. Yes, it was a full course, not just a small part of some other course. And yes, I was shocked they weren't teaching a more recent architecture.
Deal Addict
Aug 5, 2009
1383 posts
403 upvotes
Forget Assembly, I just need programmers who are good at C. It's taken me a year to hire 7 across Canada and the US and I've got to hire at least 5 more in the next 6 months. Even with the jobs allowing people to be permanent remote work-from-home in most cases.

Everyone seems to be web and/or mobile programmers, skilled at Python, JS, and other high level languages. Even hiring Co-ops and new grads it's a small number that know the fundamentals of C... Or at least know C++/C# and be able to quickly transition to C. Most of them seem to have a class on C or at least C is part of a class, but few seem to learn it beyond the basics and quickly forget it as they never use it outside of such a class.

Not that I think higher level languages suck or anything, nor that C is somehow a "real" language and others are crap - it's just that some software still needs to be written and maintained in C, and C programmers are an aging population that isn't being replaced at a fraction of what it used to be.
Member
May 29, 2017
446 posts
348 upvotes
Hugh wrote: Where is this mandatory?

Where does it fit in the course sequence?

I presume that the course specfiies an appropriate text or other resources.

A whole mandatory course on assembly seems excessive. (An optional course on computer architecture would make sense.)
We had to learn in in electronics eng.
Deal Addict
Jul 31, 2007
1083 posts
973 upvotes
Hugh wrote: Where is this mandatory?

Where does it fit in the course sequence?

I presume that the course specfiies an appropriate text or other resources.

A whole mandatory course on assembly seems excessive. (An optional course on computer architecture would make sense.)
I can't speak for Waterloo, but at McGill I definitely took a course where it was assembly the whole time and my final exam was just writing pages and pages of assembly code by hand lol
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2004
4289 posts
1744 upvotes
Toronto
johncraven wrote: I can't speak for Waterloo, but at McGill I definitely took a course where it was assembly the whole time and my final exam was just writing pages and pages of assembly code by hand lol
ECSE 324? "computer organization"?

If I were teaching computer organization, it would have a lot more stuff with little focus on assembly language. But I'm not an engineer. This is a good book https://www.amazon.ca/Computer-Architec ... 0128119055
I guess that this is a variant https://www.amazon.ca/Computer-Organiza ... 0128203315
Those two authors are very impressive. They got a Turing award in 2018. Their Award Lecture is worth catching on Youtube.

I think covering GPUs and FPGAs would be important. And various ways of interconnecting devices and processors -- that's where a lot of the innovation is.

The details of an assembly language don't seem important to me. A small amount of exposure is a Good Thing. I spent a decade writing a lot of assembly code for a variety of machines and another working on compilers to generate machine language.
Deal Addict
Jul 31, 2007
1083 posts
973 upvotes
Hugh wrote: ECSE 324? "computer organization"?

If I were teaching computer organization, it would have a lot more stuff with little focus on assembly language. But I'm not an engineer. This is a good book https://www.amazon.ca/Computer-Architec ... 0128119055
I guess that this is a variant https://www.amazon.ca/Computer-Organiza ... 0128203315
Those two authors are very impressive. They got a Turing award in 2018. Their Award Lecture is worth catching on Youtube.

I think covering GPUs and FPGAs would be important. And various ways of interconnecting devices and processors -- that's where a lot of the innovation is.

The details of an assembly language don't seem important to me. A small amount of exposure is a Good Thing. I spent a decade writing a lot of assembly code for a variety of machines and another working on compilers to generate machine language.
comp273, its been so long i forgot

Top