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Fence Collapsed , need help remove the post.

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  • May 2nd, 2021 10:33 am
[OP]
Jr. Member
May 1, 2004
145 posts
27 upvotes
Toronto

Fence Collapsed , need help remove the post.

Hi

My Fence collapsed due to strong wind yesterday.
Could anyone suggest how can I remove the riotted post with the concrete? (see the pics)

Also, Can I use 36-inch Adjustable Ground Spike for 4x4 Post Installation for the post base instead of concrete once the riotted post removed?

Thanks for any suggestions.
Images
  • fence2.jpg
  • fence1.jpg
9 replies
Sr. Member
Jan 7, 2013
775 posts
432 upvotes
Oshawa, Ontario
You need to dig out the concrete unfortunately. Dig enough dirt clear so you can pull the post/concrete out.

I would not trust the 36in spike. Edit: reading the Q&A, the manufacturer says they are only meant for mail boxes and decorative fences.

Maybe the helical piles I would trust...but those are for deck supports more than fencing.
Sr. Member
Jan 22, 2012
601 posts
222 upvotes
Bradford
You will have to dig the concrete out. At that point, with a little more work you might as well dig a new hole for a new post with concrete.

Just use the fence n post concrete. No premix needed.
Member
Aug 18, 2017
283 posts
506 upvotes
Try jacking it up with a farm jack


Farm jacks can be purchased from princess auto and are regularly on sale
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 19, 2008
6875 posts
2441 upvotes
GTA
Polymertank wrote: Try jacking it up with a farm jack


Farm jacks can be purchased from princess auto and are regularly on sale
That works best if its a solid post that doesn't need to be removed.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
6064 posts
4344 upvotes
Polymertank wrote: Try jacking it up with a farm jack


Farm jacks can be purchased from princess auto and are regularly on sale
this will not work, there is not enough of the old post coming out of the ground. The post broke lomes even to the ground... Digging is the only solution IMHO
Jr. Member
Apr 8, 2013
154 posts
60 upvotes
Toronto
cs942008 wrote: Hi

My Fence collapsed due to strong wind yesterday.
Could anyone suggest how can I remove the riotted post with the concrete? (see the pics)

Also, Can I use 36-inch Adjustable Ground Spike for 4x4 Post Installation for the post base instead of concrete once the riotted post removed?

Thanks for any suggestions.
In terms of installing a 36 inch ground spike - try the Oz-post. I replaced 5 rotting posts with Oz-posts back in 2013. The fence is still in excellent condition.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 21, 2018
5101 posts
5220 upvotes
Vancouver
Polymertank wrote: Try jacking it up with a farm jack

Farm jacks can be purchased from princess auto and are regularly on sale
Good suggestion, but clearly that's not going to work if your rotted post has snapped off at the base, which is the usual case. Also probably not if the concrete post base was poured by careless idiots who didn't make a clean hole and let concrete spread horizontally underground (personal experience). Digging out a large spread-out concrete base is a real pain, but you have little choice if you don't want to move the fence posts.

Post spikes work well, even though they are not recommended for high fences. I've used them for a low fence in an area where there was a lot of established tree roots underground and I needed to slide between them carefully rather than just hacking them up. Mine are solid after 5 years, but I can't comment on the longevity beyond that. They may corrode underground eventually.

I had a fence blow down twice in an area that got turned into a wind tunnel by construction on the neighbouring property, at one point snapping a 6x6 post in >100 kph gusts (technically the neighbour's fence since it was on his side of the line, but since it was behind a hedge on their side, it fell to me to repair it). I ended up ramming a 6' metal post into the ground behind the hedge and strapping the post to it with metal straps (fortunately it's behind the hedge on their side). It's been fine ever since.
Member
Aug 18, 2017
283 posts
506 upvotes
Yeah all these Youtube videos make things look very easy, but in real life there's always things in the way/ different issues popping up. Alternatively, OP if you want you can dig down a few inches to expose the top portion of the concrete and try to use a farm jack and some metal chain to wrap around the concrete base to see if you can get some grip on the post to lift/ wiggle the post (towards the end of the youtube video below, they explained how this can be done). The dirt around the post settles after these years and as the other poster said if the concrete spread horizontally underground during the installation, the resistance is gonna be a lot higher. But if the jack can help loosen the dirt around the post, less digging will be required. It can be a real PITA to dig fence posts out by hand(personal experience), but if it's just one post, just forget about the jack thing and use some elbow grease.

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