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  • Dec 25th, 2020 4:47 pm
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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
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May 15, 2016
6871 posts
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File copying question

I'm moving 300 GB of pictures from my phone. I was wondering what will happen if you MOVE a folder and then..

1. Cancel the transfer
2. Unplug the cable in the middle of the transfer or the transfer stops because of an error.

Does the pictures become corrupted? How can I ensure it gets transferred properly?
8 replies
Member
Dec 6, 2020
375 posts
354 upvotes
What kind of phone has 300 GB of internal storage?

Unless the move software has been written by a moron (anything is possible these days), you won't lose any data if the transfer is interrupted. The usual way to write software that moves files between storage devices is to copy first then delete the original after the copy has completed. This will proceed on a file-by-file basis; each file will be individually deleted once it has been moved.

Note, however, that if the destination device itself stops running during the transfer, some files could be lost even though the move appeared to complete. This risk is not intrinsic to move operations but rather applies to all writes to storage -- nothing is finally final until all write caches have been flushed, and that could take several minutes. If a device stops running, its caches will not be flushed and data will be lost.

If you want to be sure you don't lose anything, make a backup first. (You should have a backup anyway, in case your phone is lost/stolen or needs to be reset.)
Sr. Member
Oct 1, 2009
544 posts
235 upvotes
West coast
You're better off taking out the sd card (if you have one) and copying it to your computer.

I use a smart file manager app and transfer stuff to a shared folder before I go to sleep.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
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May 15, 2016
6871 posts
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middleofnowhere wrote: What kind of phone has 300 GB of internal storage?

Unless the move software has been written by a moron (anything is possible these days), you won't lose any data if the transfer is interrupted. The usual way to write software that moves files between storage devices is to copy first then delete the original after the copy has completed. This will proceed on a file-by-file basis; each file will be individually deleted once it has been moved.

Note, however, that if the destination device itself stops running during the transfer, some files could be lost even though the move appeared to complete. This risk is not intrinsic to move operations but rather applies to all writes to storage -- nothing is finally final until all write caches have been flushed, and that could take several minutes. If a device stops running, its caches will not be flushed and data will be lost.

If you want to be sure you don't lose anything, make a backup first. (You should have a backup anyway, in case your phone is lost/stolen or needs to be reset.)
I can't make a backup and have to transfer using a cable or wifi which is both slow. My wifi cuts out during long transfers so I'm not sure how I can backup or check that the file is properly copied.
doradxplorer wrote: You're better off taking out the sd card (if you have one) and copying it to your computer.

I use a smart file manager app and transfer stuff to a shared folder before I go to sleep.
It is an iphone :( I have to use cable.
Member
Oct 12, 2005
272 posts
75 upvotes
Markham, ON
Not sure if you are willing to spend any money. SanDisk has a Lightning/USB drive that can connect to the iPhone, and with its app, allows you to copy photos onto the drive. You can then copy the pictures from the USB drive to your computer. I have a 64GB one and it's quite fast, even on my really old iPhone 6S.

I would also copy in a few batches, rather in one shot.
Deal Fanatic
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May 11, 2009
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Debtario
I was about to suggest getting a USB OTG (on the go) cable and plugging in a flash drive or SD card with a reader/writer, but from what I read iOS does not support that.

Just use the cable, faster and should not cut out unless something is defective. There is also the slower bluetooth option as well.
"I possess a device, in my pocket, capable of accessing the entirety of information known to man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and get in arguments with strangers"
Newbie
Mar 11, 2007
64 posts
37 upvotes
Toronto
I found the easiest method is to use iCloud. Let it sync to your laptop, and delete the files off iCloud/iphone. Then back it up somewhere else.
Member
Dec 6, 2020
375 posts
354 upvotes
vivibaby wrote: I can't make a backup and have to transfer using a cable or wifi which is both slow. My wifi cuts out during long transfers so I'm not sure how I can backup or check that the file is properly copied.
Then your best choice is to copy the files to your destination device, manually open each file to verify that it's readable, then delete them from the source. This will be tedious.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 16, 2008
8060 posts
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Maple
vivibaby wrote: I'm moving 300 GB of pictures from my phone. I was wondering what will happen if you MOVE a folder and then..

1. Cancel the transfer
2. Unplug the cable in the middle of the transfer or the transfer stops because of an error.

Does the pictures become corrupted? How can I ensure it gets transferred properly?
Whatever you do, I strongly suggest copy then delete later, DON’T cut/paste, you will loose everything if cancelled or power shortage.

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