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Fridge and Induction stove...extended warranty?

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  • Feb 18th, 2021 9:16 am
[OP]
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
12309 posts
2061 upvotes

Fridge and Induction stove...extended warranty?

I usually never buy extended warranties but I am thinking about it for a Stove and Fridge purchase. Just want to know what your opinion of getting warranties for these appliances these days.

My family has had probably 3 or 4 stoves break due to some control panel issue, but luckily I was able to fix them all just be buying and replacing the control panel. So this kind of issue, I can fix. My stove is induction, if that matters.

Fridge...what kind of issues do people have with fridges?

I'm thinking to skip the extended warranty of both but I am considering one or both.

My credit card should extend the warranty an extra year for 2 years total.
10 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 2, 2018
1679 posts
1703 upvotes
Toronto
Normally I am not an extended warranty person.

That said appliances like fridges and stoves are very expensive, when i renovated my place and replaced all my appliances the replacement cost and repair liabilities made my decision. I purchsed extended warranties and have piece of mind.

If talking TV's I dont bother, prices drop so quickly and standards increase (1080p, 4k, 8k) that a few years later that existing set isn't worth the additional warranty outlay.

A fridge and range are complicated mechanically items these days, repairs very costly and repurchase price also prohibitive. So if your appliances are $2k upwards to $4k I would do the insurance. If you are talking budget appliances then I would not get extended warranties as you can replace them in the future without as much financial pain.
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[OP]
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
12309 posts
2061 upvotes
Also, since I am not usually a warranty person I was thinking to gamble and get warranty on just one of them. If you were to choose one, which one?
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
2205 posts
2702 upvotes
West GTA
Fridges break all the time, they bell curve to 10 years and plenty break at five years. It's a sad state of affairs.
Deal Addict
Dec 14, 2011
1857 posts
1029 upvotes
London
Absolutely for the induction. Adding the fridge is probably not much more. See if they include a lemon clause so you get your money back if they can't fix it. That is what happened to me for both my fridge and induction stove. I had fat stacks of Lowe's gift cards.

Lesson learned, don't by a kitchen appliance from an electronics company (esp. Samsung).
[OP]
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
12309 posts
2061 upvotes
Drakestar wrote: Absolutely for the induction. Adding the fridge is probably not much more. See if they include a lemon clause so you get your money back if they can't fix it. That is what happened to me for both my fridge and induction stove. I had fat stacks of Lowe's gift cards.

Lesson learned, don't by a kitchen appliance from an electronics company (esp. Samsung).
Yes my parents Samsung died completely right after warranty ended! I'm getting GE but still worried about all the electronics. Unfortunately no gas line or I would love the completely mechanical ones with no electronics
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
955 posts
433 upvotes
slowtyper wrote: Yes my parents Samsung died completely right after warranty ended! I'm getting GE but still worried about all the electronics. Unfortunately no gas line or I would love the completely mechanical ones with no electronics
I bought the cheapest Fridgidaire refridgerator from Costco in 2006 when my refridgerator unexpectedly died on me. It's still running fine. I have never maintained it.

I've been waiting for it to die because it's so ugly. It's got a will to live. Maybe buy the cheapest model possible. Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes
Deal Expert
User avatar
Sep 21, 2010
15185 posts
4626 upvotes
Montréal
Knock wood don't wanna jinx myself.

I never had my induction long enough but the staff advised when I was buying appliances to warranty the ones w moving parts (i.e. dishwasher, washer) but not too much about the rest w no real moving parts (stove, fridge, dryer...debatable). Seems to make sense.
Hard work, inheritance, interest on interest accumulating, and stock and real estate speculation. It's all good.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
13003 posts
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Edmonton
On one side, you've got the fridge with an expensive motor and compressor. On the other side, you've got an electronic stove, which will have expensive computer boards that tend to fail because they get too hot. Neither one is optimal for a long life. But if you have extended warranty from your credit card, you might just leave it alone, and just budget for replacing one of them around the time the warranty is up.

Basically, if you don't get insurance, you're "self-insuring". The companies offer the insurance policies because they're a money-maker for them (the companies selling the policies), not to do you a favor. So if you can afford to replace the appliances (or fix them), then there's no reason to get insurance. If you don't feel comfortable with a large repair or replacement bill, then get the insurance.

C
[OP]
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
12309 posts
2061 upvotes
The store also offers that if I don't end up using the insurance, I get the money back in a store credit.
Jr. Member
Mar 21, 2007
192 posts
21 upvotes
Toronto
I'd recommend it for the induction. We have a Dacor induction cooktop that's less than 5 years old and the main burner broke. We paid to have it repaired and they tried to find a replacement part but sadly Dacor (and now Samsung who owns Dacor) could not provide the replacement parts. As well, they were unable to fix the computer that broke so we're left with a cooktop with the main burner broken.

We also have a Jenn-Air dual oven that has had to be replaced. Any appliance with a computer is risky.

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