Food & Drink

Which Frying Pans should I buy?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 29th, 2021 5:55 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 27, 2021
1 posts

Which Frying Pans should I buy?

Hi Everyone! I need a high quality frying pan for my Kitchen. The quality material should be wonderful. There is no issue of budget at all. Waiting for response. Thank You in advance.
16 replies
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28124 posts
13717 upvotes
Even though it's the opposite of "money is no object" I like restaurant pans. Dirt cheap and really heavy duty. If you scrub them real good, they look brand new despite being 10+ years old.
Non stick does wear out but it's cheap enough to replace it when it does.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jan 9, 2011
12560 posts
15947 upvotes
Vancouver
ginzio wrote: Hi Everyone! I need a high quality frying pan for my Kitchen. The quality material should be wonderful. There is no issue of budget at all. Waiting for response. Thank You in advance.
Cast iron. I've been through many and the only two I have left for the last decade are both cast iron. I expect I will have them for the rest of my life. Cast iron is not expensive, but they do take more work to care for and maintain than teflon.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
7189 posts
3342 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
IKEA Vardagen
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 7, 2005
18073 posts
1092 upvotes
On the "restaurant pans" note above, indeed, a cheap and much lighter weight/size alternative to cast iron favorites are carbon steel pans. Check them out. You've likely seen them piled up and stacked very high at many restaurants.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28124 posts
13717 upvotes
duckdown wrote: On the "restaurant pans" note above, indeed, a cheap and much lighter weight/size alternative to cast iron favorites are carbon steel pans. Check them out. You've likely seen them piled up and stacked very high at many restaurants.
I've only really seen carbon steel at very high end restaurants, and even then it's pretty few and far between.
Better restaurants use stainless steel, but the vast majority use aluminum.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 7, 2005
18073 posts
1092 upvotes
I thought those were carbon steel!
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2010
5327 posts
4263 upvotes
Another vote for cast iron. Just make sure you read up how to take care of them first before buying.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
19471 posts
17178 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Cast iron … for life
And Tfal … for convenience & non stick disposability *

The distinctive red T is found as a mainstay in many cooking shows with Celebrity Chefs

* Just be aware that the surface is destructible. And it’s a chemical. So once it’s marked up, it should be tossed, versus you ingesting that crap / carcinogen.
This is not an issue with Cast Iron .. which will build up a natural non stick surface over time. But it’s a process for sure!
Deal Guru
Jun 24, 2006
10757 posts
4865 upvotes
I have probably shared this before is one thread or another, but this reminds me of Grandma's pans ( Mom's Mom ).

I always remember the collection of cast iron pans, dutch ovens, etc She had when I was child. No one was allowed to use them but her.

IT was only later in life I learn from one of my Aunts these were Griswold pans, and would be well in excess of 100 years old in my opinion. What happened to them? Well, when I asked my Mom about it, turns out, after my Grandparents passed, they divided them up amongst my Mom and Her 3 sisters. My Mom, not understanding what they were took Her's to the blue bin.

I would have loved to have got my hands on that one.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
14837 posts
9623 upvotes
Markham
There is no one "best" fry pan IMO as it depends on what you are cooking and even how you cook to some extent.

If you don't want maintenance, I'd say stick with the stainless steel pan is the way to go.

If you are a "health" conscious type, you probably want a non-stick pan.

A lot of ppl have multiple pans and multiple sizes for multiple uses/purposes...cast iron [Lodge/Wagner], carbon steel [deBuyer], Stainless steel [All-Clad], Aluminum [go with restaurant trade type], Non-stick [All-Clad].
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28124 posts
13717 upvotes
duckdown wrote: I thought those were carbon steel!
Obviously it depends on the restaurant, but basically every restaurant I've ever passed through has been aluminum. I don't think I ever saw carbon steel anywhere personally either professionally or even as a guest.
I'm definitely not saying they don't exist because I've seen a few on TV a few times, but even that's pretty rare.
PointsHubby wrote: The distinctive red T is found as a mainstay in many cooking shows with Celebrity Chefs
This is probably due to sponsorship for exactly this reason.

* Just be aware that the surface is destructible. And it’s a chemical. So once it’s marked up, it should be tossed, versus you ingesting that crap / carcinogen.
Non stick pans are a consumable. It's better to baby a non stick and only use it for non stick things like eggs rather than use it as your "full time" pan. Another material is better suited for general usage. Then you save your non stick for eggs.
This is not an issue with Cast Iron .. which will build up a natural non stick surface over time. But it’s a process for sure!
While also true, it's never as non stick as a non stick pan. They do get slick but they also require a good bit of maintenance. It also takes quite a while to develop a really good surface. Years in fact.
But once you have it, they are amazing pans.

gr8dlr wrote: There is no one "best" fry pan IMO as it depends on what you are cooking and even how you cook to some extent.
100% this.
I'd never use aluminum for eggs and I'd never use non stick for searing.
Non-stick [All-Clad].
I mean... people can do whatever they want with their money, but I'd never buy a "name brand" pan.
Too expensive for being a consumable object.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28124 posts
13717 upvotes
What somewhat surprises me is the new fangled ceramic pans.
I bought one as a test for a friend of mine to abuse and it's held up surprisingly well especially considering this story.

He wanted to make smash burgers. Turning to youtube, he found a video that said to use as high of heat as you can find. What wasn't taken into account by anyone was the fact that "high heat" means a residential stove high heat, not a burner meant for frying turkeys. So he burned the SHIT out of the pan.
Oil fire and everything. I thought the coating was ruined because scrubbing it with a scrub pad didn't take it off. I thought it vaporized since oil's ignition temperature is like 900F. In a last ditch effort, I took a wire scrubbie to it, expecting a bare metal pan. No. The burnt layer of whatever came off. The finish was pristine considering the temperature.
It doesn't feel nearly as non stick as it did when it was new, but I wasn't expecting it to last anyways. Despite the commercials, the biggest complaint is that it doesn't feel non stick after a few months.
I just accelerated this. It still functions just fine as a mildly non stick pan (ie I cant do eggs) but it still functions just fine as a pan.
I still use that pan today on the same burner to cook steaks and burgers. Even my friend does too, but he watches the temperature a bit more closely.

I still don't think it's a pan to rule them all, but I'd welcome them into my kitchen which is saying a lot.
I'd still keep a real non stick pan because nothing is better for sticky proteins like eggs.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 2, 2018
1204 posts
1193 upvotes
Toronto
What kind of cooking surface do you own, that will make a difference.

On a glass cook top i would NOT recommend cast iron, you are likely to drop and ruin your cook top. For induction again that technology reduces the products you may wish to consider. Also depends on your cooking needs, are you going from the stovetop to the oven, or broiler then all metal restaurant style is the way to go.

Whichever choice i always look for a perfectly flat bottom and more perpendicular sides, allows grease to be distributed evenly across the entire surface and even cooking. While i prefer that quality, i can see a more curved edge for making omelettes where i wish to slide the food stuff in plating.

I would use cast iron for steaks but not on a glass cooktop, and due to their weight would use only in a specialty pan for steaks not every pan in my drawer in a gas cooktop.
Youth is the gift of nature, age is a work of art.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
19471 posts
17178 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Ballroomblitz1 wrote: What kind of cooking surface do you own, that will make a difference.

On a glass cook top i would NOT recommend cast iron, you are likely to drop and ruin your cook top. For induction again that technology reduces the products you may wish to consider. Also depends on your cooking needs, are you going from the stovetop to the oven, or broiler then all metal restaurant style is the way to go.

Whichever choice i always look for a perfectly flat bottom and more perpendicular sides, allows grease to be distributed evenly across the entire surface and even cooking. While i prefer that quality, i can see a more curved edge for making omelettes where i wish to slide the food stuff in plating.

I would use cast iron for steaks but not on a glass cooktop, and due to their weight would use only in a specialty pan for steaks not every pan in my drawer in a gas cooktop.
We’ve had it all … between houses & vacation rental condos
Old style electric coils, glass top, and gas

NEVER have I ever had an issue with using cast iron

The only difference isn’t so much dropping it (I don’t drop pots on any stove top)
So much as it is dragging it across the glass surface cuz they tend to be heavy
But that’s true of any pot on a glass surface … it’ll scratch the surface
When you own glass, you got to get into the practice of lift & place
Vs dragging
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 7, 2005
18073 posts
1092 upvotes
gas range here! wouldn't have it any other way now that my new place has one

Top