Home & Garden

garage door r value

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  • May 15th, 2020 1:44 am
[OP]
Penalty Box
Aug 21, 2010
1359 posts
653 upvotes
toronto

garage door r value

in the market for this kind of garage
https://www.doddsdoors.com/residential/ ... temporary/

in mississauga....i see all kind of prices for this...crazy...any recomedation for a garage door sales for this..
as well would you deal with kijji ..i see people on these that have these doors

and finally what minimum r value for insulation should you recommend for this type a door..especailly for our cold winters
thanks
Last edited by your best bet on May 13th, 2020 9:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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27 replies
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11451 posts
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Paris
Minimum r value is .1

I would not trust kijij.
Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
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your best bet wrote: in the market for this kind of garage
https://www.doddsdoors.com/residential/ ... temporary/

in mississauga....i see all kind of prices for this...crazy...any recomedation for a garage door sales for this..
as well would you deal with kijji ..i see people on these that have these doors

and finally what minimum r value for insulation should you recommend for this type a door..especailly for our cold winters
thanks
You'll likely get better deals the farther away from the GTA you go. Unfortunately they're pricey. You can save at least $1k if you DIY install.
You lose a lot of R value with windows as well, so if you care about insulation go without windows. You'll also save some money.
Last edited by engineered on May 13th, 2020 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
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Is the rest of your garage completely insulated?

Also, lots of good choices for companies at affordable prices, skip Kijiji.
Deal Addict
Nov 6, 2014
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Maybe someone can explain, but aren't most modern homes with attached garages have soffits that ventilate the air between the inside and outside of the garage? Mine is, and the outside air freely flows through the soffet whether in cold or hot weather. So how does an insulated garage door help? Is it only applicable to "sealed" or completely enclosed garages? Just curious the application as I'm not knowledgeable on use cases of insulated garage doors. (pardon my lack of knowledge)
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
fordmaple wrote: Maybe someone can explain, but aren't most modern homes with attached garages have soffits that ventilate the air between the inside and outside of the garage? Mine is, and the outside air freely flows through the soffet whether in cold or hot weather. So how does an insulated garage door help? Is it only applicable to "sealed" or completely enclosed garages? Just curious the application as I'm not knowledgeable on use cases of insulated garage doors. (pardon my lack of knowledge)
Same soffit is in your house. My garage has a ceiling just like the rest of the house, insulated space directly on ceiling then cold attic
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May 10, 2005
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your best bet wrote: in the market for this kind of garage
https://www.doddsdoors.com/residential/ ... temporary/

in mississauga....i see all kind of prices for this...crazy...any recomedation for a garage door sales for this..
as well would you deal with kijji ..i see people on these that have these doors

and finally what minimum r value for insulation should you recommend for this type a door..especailly for our cold winters
thanks
I recommend that you get a steel (or metal) door. Get it painted in the factory as it will be baked on and last a very long time.
Be aware that it is a garage door and not a normal door that seals properly. It will always leak cold air just because of the way it operates and the sealing rubber around the door not being truly a seal.
I would get it insulated for sure, R8 is good as that will give you double steel panels and it is a lot quieter opening and closing.
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
156 posts
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Toronto
Thanks Pete.
Just to confirm even the garage walls are not completely insulated, it is still better to insulate the garage door? Would that help keep the rooms above warmer?
Although I believe my garage ceiling is insulated, one of the rooms above the garage is super cold comparing to other rooms in the house... And no heating source in the garage...
Pete_Coach wrote: I recommend that you get a steel (or metal) door. Get it painted in the factory as it will be baked on and last a very long time.
Be aware that it is a garage door and not a normal door that seals properly. It will always leak cold air just because of the way it operates and the sealing rubber around the door not being truly a seal.
I would get it insulated for sure, R8 is good as that will give you double steel panels and it is a lot quieter opening and closing.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
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No.6 wrote: Thanks Pete.
Just to confirm even the garage walls are not completely insulated, it is still better to insulate the garage door? Would that help keep the rooms above warmer?
Although I believe my garage ceiling is insulated, one of the rooms above the garage is super cold comparing to other rooms in the house... And no heating source in the garage...
It is most likely that there are some gaps in the insulation above your garage, improper air sealing, or there just isnt enough insulation there to begin with. When I've opened up garage ceilings in the past, its usually all 3.

Having an insulated garage door will for sure make your garage warmer even if the other two walls are not insulated. If you have Brick veneer thats probably an R value of 1, and then maybe a wee bit extra from other stuff. So you've probably got R1 and change in your other walls. So after you put in an insulated garage door, the walls will be where the most heat escapes from. When I put an insulated garage door into my garage which isnt insulated, the temperature went up in the winter by a noticeable amount. Probably only a few degrees in most cases, but if you have a room above, it will probably make more of a difference.
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Feb 11, 2007
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No.6 wrote: Thanks Pete.
Just to confirm even the garage walls are not completely insulated, it is still better to insulate the garage door? Would that help keep the rooms above warmer?
Although I believe my garage ceiling is insulated, one of the rooms above the garage is super cold comparing to other rooms in the house... And no heating source in the garage...
Insulating the garage walls and door will help keep the room above warmer.
How well insulated and sealed is your current door?
If you can improve the ceiling insulation, that would be most helpful.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
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No.6 wrote: Thanks Pete.
Just to confirm even the garage walls are not completely insulated, it is still better to insulate the garage door? Would that help keep the rooms above warmer?
Although I believe my garage ceiling is insulated, one of the rooms above the garage is super cold comparing to other rooms in the house... And no heating source in the garage...
It sounds like your garage is under part of your house. The garage needs to be sealed to prevent any fumes from the garage entering the house so I am sure that the ceiling and walls attaching the garage to the house are well insulated and sealed.
I had a similar situation. My back bedroom was over the garage and was cool. The solution was not a garage door but to balance the ducts and get them sealed. The back bedroom is now warmer. Although I did get a metal insulated door and a belt driven opener (because the house shook with the old chain opener) it made no difference in the room temperature.
I see you like the "modern" look of those doors but they will be expensive.
If those doors are wood, then it may make no (or little) difference. as wood is heavy and insulates fairly well. If they are metal then yes, they should be insulated just to make them sturdier.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
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The real reason to get an insulated garage door is for the rigidity/sound of the door. They're way more durable, don't clank and bang when they open etc.

I'd suggest the R value of a typical garage door is largely meaningless. The reduction of air movement is the key, so make sure it's well sealed/gaskets etc.

So get all the windows you want in the door if that makes you happy. Frankly I think these 'modern' garage doors are already very dated looking. I'd just get a plain flat slab door. No windows, no embossed panels - just flat slab. Looks modern and minimalist, offers the best R value for what that's worth, no glass to crack and won't look dated in 10 years.
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Nov 17, 2012
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...that being said I do like this one from their gallery. But it's much more classic mid-century design than some of the other current crap parading as 'architecture'.

Good:

Image

Horrible:

Image
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
torontotim wrote: ...that being said I do like this one from their gallery. But it's much more classic mid-century design than some of the other current crap parading as 'architecture'.
I love the look of your good but questions the price of an entire section replaced with some sort of clearish material. That would cost a small fortune to do frameless correctly. 3 panels... $300 each. Translucent panel... $2500
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Feb 4, 2015
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Jerico wrote: I love the look of your good but questions the price of an entire section replaced with some sort of clearish material. That would cost a small fortune to do frameless correctly. 3 panels... $300 each. Translucent panel... $2500
I wouldn't necessarily pay for it, but it's the only way I'd bother with glass in a garage door. Looks great in that application. Would look shite in most other contexts.

But if the difference was $900 for three windows vs. $2500 for a solid translucent panel? You bet I'd shell out the $1600 extra. In a heartbeat.

Like I say - solid slab flat insulated door.
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
156 posts
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Toronto
Thanks Pete! Actually I am not the OP...
Would you know how to get the ducts sealed and balanced? would a HVAC company be able to do that?
we have 2 rooms above the garage. 1 room with 2 vents and another with only 1 vent. the room with 1 vent is the issue.
i think our current garage doors are made of recycled paper (cheap builder stuff) - would you think adding insulation to the door will help?
Thanks again...
Pete_Coach wrote: It sounds like your garage is under part of your house. The garage needs to be sealed to prevent any fumes from the garage entering the house so I am sure that the ceiling and walls attaching the garage to the house are well insulated and sealed.
I had a similar situation. My back bedroom was over the garage and was cool. The solution was not a garage door but to balance the ducts and get them sealed. The back bedroom is now warmer. Although I did get a metal insulated door and a belt driven opener (because the house shook with the old chain opener) it made no difference in the room temperature.
I see you like the "modern" look of those doors but they will be expensive.
If those doors are wood, then it may make no (or little) difference. as wood is heavy and insulates fairly well. If they are metal then yes, they should be insulated just to make them sturdier.
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May 10, 2005
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No.6 wrote: Thanks Pete! Actually I am not the OP...
Would you know how to get the ducts sealed and balanced? would a HVAC company be able to do that?
we have 2 rooms above the garage. 1 room with 2 vents and another with only 1 vent. the room with 1 vent is the issue.
i think our current garage doors are made of recycled paper (cheap builder stuff) - would you think adding insulation to the door will help?
Thanks again...
There is a company called Aeroseal. A rather long thread here on it. aeroseal-duct-work-2347730/7/#p32051501
I had it done because I was to able e to balance my ducts to get even heat throughout the house. My back bedrooms were as much as 5 degrees colder. I had a lot of leakage I was not able to seal a lot of the ducts because they were hidden in walls and floors. I now have my rooms pretty close to the same temperatures. The heat is even throughout the house. Having said that, (and I get no commission from Aeroseal)

I strongly suggest you learn how to balance your duct work and make adjustments first. https://www.centralhtg.com/blog/air-balancing
When you do some adjustments with the dampers, the result is not instant. It can take up to a week (3 days minimum) to notice any difference.

Aeroseal is not cheap but, the comfort level in all the rooms in my house is so much better, it was worth every penny.

As for a garage door, builders grade is thin MDF. Sealing the garage is a big step. Meaning, ensuring the seals around the garage door (all 4 sides) is good. You should be able to see it if inside with the door closed, any light coming in around the door is poor seal. Then of course, insulation in the ceiling of the garage if the rooms are above the garage.
Jr. Member
Sep 10, 2006
156 posts
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Toronto
Thanks Pete! I will check out Aeroseal.
Re: garage doors... yes i can see light coming in around one door (right side) Disappointed But Relieved Face I will also look into sealing the garage doors... would you have any recommendations on a contractor? thanks...
Pete_Coach wrote: There is a company called Aeroseal. A rather long thread here on it.
I had it done because I was to able e to balance my ducts to get even heat throughout the house. My back bedrooms were as much as 5 degrees colder. I had a lot of leakage I was not able to seal a lot of the ducts because they were hidden in walls and floors. I now have my rooms pretty close to the same temperatures. The heat is even throughout the house. Having said that, (and I get no commission from Aeroseal)

I strongly suggest you learn how to balance your duct work and make adjustments first. https://www.centralhtg.com/blog/air-balancing
When you do some adjustments with the dampers, the result is not instant. It can take up to a week (3 days minimum) to notice any difference.

Aeroseal is not cheap but, the comfort level in all the rooms in my house is so much better, it was worth every penny.

As for a garage door, builders grade is thin MDF. Sealing the garage is a big step. Meaning, ensuring the seals around the garage door (all 4 sides) is good. You should be able to see it if inside with the door closed, any light coming in around the door is poor seal. Then of course, insulation in the ceiling of the garage if the rooms are above the garage.
Last edited by No.6 on May 14th, 2020 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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No.6 wrote: Thanks Pete! I will check out Aeroseal.
Re: garage doors... yes i can see light coming in around one door Disappointed But Relieved Face I will also look into sealing the garage doors... would you have any recommendations on a contractor? thanks...
No sorry, not form Toronto. Many on this forum are and maybe they can help.
What are you looking for in a contractor? To do duct balancing? To fix the garage door?
Aeroseal https://aerosealtech.ca/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw ... vmEALw_wcB
Oh, they claim energy savings....I am not sure about that. My issue was the temperature variations in the house and it was corrected with the Aeroseal and that made me and my family very happy.

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