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Gas line in ceiling

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[OP]
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May 15, 2017
253 posts
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Gas line in ceiling

Need some help. A CSST (yellow) gas line is running from a T near the furnace the length of the house along the ceiling of an unfinished basement. It then transitions inside to black metal pipe, and out through the wall to a BBQ.
Can this be concealed with a drywall ceiling? What should be done?
7 replies
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Oct 15, 2007
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turtler wrote: Need some help. A CSST (yellow) gas line is running from a T near the furnace the length of the house along the ceiling of an unfinished basement. It then transitions inside to black metal pipe, and out through the wall to a BBQ.
Can this be concealed with a drywall ceiling? What should be done?
Most CSST manufacturer's allow the CSST and fittings to be concealed. There may be protection requirements in the CSST manual that would require you install metal strike plates to protect the CSST. With gas pipe or tubing, we can conceal piping and fittings, but cannot conceal a union. You can conceal a tee, but not a shut off valve. If you run CSST inside a joist space, it must be kept 1.75" from either the top or bottom of the joist so that a screw cannot pierce the tubing or CSST.

You're supposed to be certified per the brand of CSST you're working with. There's at least 5 different brands, but the most common are tracpipe, wardflex, and gastite. Their manual's go in to great detail with what is and isn't allowed.
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
[OP]
Member
May 15, 2017
253 posts
275 upvotes
Any recommendations? Do you think I should run all black pipe or keep the CSST. I'm assuming I can't conceal it under drywall then, since the black pipe and CSST are joined together.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
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Read the installation instructions as per Red_Army instructed and you may only need to put an access cover where the CSST transitions to the black pipe.
[OP]
Member
May 15, 2017
253 posts
275 upvotes
Does the Ontario building code have anything about this? I can't seem to find anything.
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2005
3333 posts
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Mississauga
Reviving this thread since its relevant to what I want to do.

I want to take a gas run from the furnace room (basement) to the other side of the house and terminate it in a fireplace on the main level. The actual connections on both ends will happen later.. (+-2 years). However I am doing renos in the basement and it will be easier to run the line and leave it (in the basement) while the ceiling is open.

Can I run a CSST line for this purpose ? and leave it unterminated.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4700 posts
2601 upvotes
TLSRULZ wrote: Reviving this thread since its relevant to what I want to do.

I want to take a gas run from the furnace room (basement) to the other side of the house and terminate it in a fireplace on the main level. The actual connections on both ends will happen later.. (+-2 years). However I am doing renos in the basement and it will be easier to run the line and leave it (in the basement) while the ceiling is open.

Can I run a CSST line for this purpose ? and leave it unterminated.
From the gas code 2010

6.16.12
Corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) and fittings shall be protected against physical damage in accordance with the manufacturer’s certified installation instructions and with this Code.

Check with the manufacturer of the CSST ... here is an example.
https://tracpipe.ca/wp-content/uploads/ ... _Guide.pdf

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