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Getting a rescue dog

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  • Jul 11th, 2020 4:28 am
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Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
5388 posts
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SW corner of the cou…
Looks like B.C. has reduced the number of puppies that are conceived unintentionally hence a very limited supply (pretty much the same for cats) hence why young animals are so hard to come by.
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1374 posts
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British Columbia
thriftshopper wrote: Looks like B.C. has reduced the number of puppies that are conceived unintentionally hence a very limited supply (pretty much the same for cats) hence why young animals are so hard to come by.
Up north may still have a problem but nowhere in the lower mainland.

New puppies at work (which we see almost daily, if not multiple times daily) are one of three things: Purebred with papers (and potentially flown in from another country), from a backyard breeder (usually found online and also frequently the "breeder" is located and hour or more out of the city), or rehomed when someone doesn't want a puppy -- either given to them from a friend or found online when someone realises they don't have time for it. That's it. That's all I ever see. I honestly can't remember the last time I saw paperwork for a young dog aquired from the SPCA. Getting one from there must be like winning the lottery. Face With Tears Of Joy
Deal Addict
Nov 18, 2005
4964 posts
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Kitchener
Got our Walker hound 3 years ago from Save Me Dog Rescue. Good experience, she needed a lot of training and attention. Still has high anxiety about being alone or loud bangs. The owner of Save Me even came to our house and interviewed us
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Deal Addict
Dec 24, 2007
1907 posts
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Toronto
That’s a cute dog.

We got a Beagle from A Dogs Dream Rescue almost a year ago from a high kill shelter in Kentucky. We work and train him for several months and became part of our family . He gets along with our larger Golden and they both love playing for hours.

Rescues are not for everyone as it takes time to train them but at the end you have a friend and just knowing that we saved a dog makes a big difference to us.

Cheers and good luck !
Drthorne wrote: Got our Walker hound 3 years ago from Save Me Dog Rescue. Good experience, she needed a lot of training and attention. Still has high anxiety about being alone or loud bangs. The owner of Save Me even came to our house and interviewed us

20190607_080801.jpg
Thread started in 2016 - 1927 fully gutted and renovated 2 storey detached home in the big T.O. - small projects still in progress.

RFD priceless!
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
5388 posts
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SW corner of the cou…
Had dinner last night at the neighbours where other people were there. One of them runs an obedience dog school to train dogs with behavioural issues. She's currently trying to train some rescued dog from Mexico, who she said should have been left down there. Apparently someone else tied to put the dog down but couldn't (we thought it was because the dog just laughed off the euthanasia drugs but it was because the vet wouldn't). Her goal now is to make the dog (a pit bull and couple of other breed mixed in) merely tolerable.

She (a dog lover) says too many dogs are coming into the country with a lot of weird diseases that are dormant (including rabies) and often undetected. Her take on taking pets to the vet is not unless absolutely necessary due to possible exposure to weird, lesser-known pathogens.
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
Newbie
Sep 12, 2017
15 posts
2 upvotes
good for you! I hope you already get a dog by now.

I see a lot of argument here. As the parent of a rescued dog, and hopefully soon two, I want to share my story and experience. Because there are so many misperceptions out there.

My experience, a rescued adult dog, fearful aggression, particularly towards man, abusive history, severely injured as a result, separation anxiety that he pees and poops even just a few seconds after I leave the room, no previous training and socialization observed, scared of any objective presented in front of him, scared of anything lifted and waved in front of him, you name it.

Now, he has none of the above. The most playful dog that wants to play with everyone, man or woman, and of course other dogs. Through the process, I read over 20 books, most of which are garbage after I accumulate enough right knowledge, and tons of training videos & stories online, help from friends who are experienced with dogs, I meant really savvy experience, not the average ones. No professional trainer involved.

First of all, almost all issues of dogs can be managed. I wouldn’t say fixed, but they can all be managed well enough to fit in a suitable household for both humans and dogs to enjoy a wonderful life together. Because you can’t erase the bad memory, but you can create a lot of happy ones so that they forget the bad ones in life. Be happy is dog’s survival skills. If they possibly can, they will be happy.

Second, having experience with animals doesn’t mean have compassion or have the power of knowledge and love to help rescued dogs. So many people have dogs. But not many, unfortunately, can or is willing to spend the time and efforts to take proper care of dogs. And they blame the dogs on everything that is actually due to their own laziness.

Rescued dogs aren’t for everyone. If I were the shelter, I wouldn’t approve the application of the person who left messages above saying not receiving any response. Nothing wrong with the person. Rescued dogs just aren’t for you.

Rescued dogs are for those who want to offer love and compassion; not to pick a dog that based on own unique preference. Because rescued dogs will have a history that you will never know full of, and nothing is their fault.

For those who are not prepared for the required amount of love, patience, time and efforts, and most important the possible surprised behaviors that could be triggered down the road and have commitment to work through that, please don’t go to shelters, go to breeders. The dogs at shelters are unfortunate enough, please do NOT add more to them. They are not give it a try dogs. They are dogs who need commitment and more than average love, patience and compassion.

I commit to only have rescue dogs myself. Because I have opportunity to learn the stories of people who are among the most compassionate and loving and have done much more than anyone can imagine for humans’ best friend, dogs. And I strive to contribute just 1% of equivalent.

Don’t blame dogs, humans. Don’t be ignorant, humans. Being selfish is ok, as everyone is selfish; just don’t overdo it. If humans are indeed the most advantaged creature on earth, there is nothing you can’t do, just you choose not to do.

Getting a dog from breeders is nothing wrong. Dogs from both breeders and shelters are worth unlimited love. Just don’t turn a breeder dog to another shelter dog. If dog is not for you, not having any is the most responsible decision.

You can be responsible in so many ways, including being honest that you are not a dog person, as many people are. And again nothing wrong. Katties are cute too. Any living creature has its own beauty and I am sure your love will add more sunshine to their lives.
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1374 posts
1036 upvotes
British Columbia
Eileen7424 wrote: Rescued dogs aren’t for everyone. If I were the shelter, I wouldn’t approve the application of the person who left messages above saying not receiving any response. Nothing wrong with the person. Rescued dogs just aren’t for you.
Asking for a small young female dog is too much? Ok then... Obviously a shelter is not for me then. That's fine. As I said, I tried for a long time and have multipule references, a yard, lots of time to spend, and have tamed feral cats and found it very rewarding.

The issue was not my application, but the sever lack of dogs available in the area. Repeatedly I've mentioned puppies (under a year) sell for 650 dollars at the SPCA here due to high demand and that working at a vet I have yet to ever meet an adopted dog that is still a puppy from the SPCA. A few I have met in working with a rescue organization have come from pregnant dogs taken from high kill shelters in California, but those are all Pit Bills and not for me.

There were those 17 Husky puppies on the news a few months back that recieved 1,200 applications. Sort of sums up the situation in BC.
Newbie
Sep 12, 2017
15 posts
2 upvotes
Karala wrote: Asking for a small young female dog is too much? Ok then... Obviously a shelter is not for me then. That's fine. As I said, I tried for a long time and have multipule references, a yard, lots of time to spend, and have tamed feral cats and found it very rewarding.

The issue was not my application, but the sever lack of dogs available in the area. Repeatedly I've mentioned puppies (under a year) sell for 650 dollars at the SPCA here due to high demand and that working at a vet I have yet to ever meet an adopted dog that is still a puppy from the SPCA. A few I have met in working with a rescue organization have come from pregnant dogs taken from high kill shelters in California, but those are all Pit Bills and not for me.

There were those 17 Husky puppies on the news a few months back that recieved 1,200 applications. Sort of sums up the situation in BC.

Your response demonstrates my points. People who are right for shelter dogs won't feel hurt when they get rejected. They would feel super happy about it, because that means the dog finds a home and they can help another dog. If there is no dog available, isn't that the best thing for our best friends? They also won't have the need to prove how hard it's to get a rescued dog and there is nothing wrong with their applications. They also won't feel bitter or frustrated about it. For rescued dogs, they need to be at the center of people's thinking, and I see that as a good match. Because only in that way you will be able to figure out their past, the impact and how to help them get better. You are right nothing is wrong with your application, but if I feel you might not be a good match with shelter dogs here, some of the people who review the applications might feel the same.

Again, there is nothing wrong. It's the match. Different people should have whatever match them the most. And certainly no one is going to match everything. I got rejected on my applications multiple times and I can only feel happy for those dogs. If you get a dog from the breeder and train them well to be a good dog citizen, that's super wonderful.

Regarding the fees, I know the price tag on a shelter dog is not inexpensive. There are various shelters offering different price with a big range. If you are not happy about one shelter, you can always go to another. In my case, I checked after my adoption, the surgery the shelter did for my boy, costs over 3000 at a private vet. And I am sure he is not the most expensive one. So in a way they need to average cost for all the dogs. I am not trying to justify their price tag. But to me, I'd be willing to pay to help them provide more funding and help more dogs, if they are indeed put animals at the center of their heart.

Good luck on your journey with dogs. I really wish you will have more positive experience in the future. And thank you for paying attention to these wonderful creatures!
Newbie
Sep 12, 2017
15 posts
2 upvotes
Eileen7424 wrote: Your response demonstrates my points. People who are right for shelter dogs won't feel hurt when they get rejected. They would feel super happy about it, because that means the dog finds a home and they can help another dog. If there is no dog available, isn't that the best thing for our best friends? They also won't have the need to prove how hard it's to get a rescued dog and there is nothing wrong with their applications. They also won't feel bitter or frustrated about it. For rescued dogs, they need to be at the center of people's thinking, and I see that as a good match. Because only in that way you will be able to figure out their past, the impact and how to help them get better. You are right nothing is wrong with your application, but if I feel you might not be a good match with shelter dogs here, some of the people who review the applications might feel the same.

Again, there is nothing wrong. It's the match. Different people should have whatever match them the most. And certainly no one is going to match everything. I got rejected on my applications multiple times and I can only feel happy for those dogs. If you get a dog from the breeder and train them well to be a good dog citizen, that's super wonderful.

Regarding the fees, I know the price tag on a shelter dog is not inexpensive. There are various shelters offering different price with a big range. If you are not happy about one shelter, you can always go to another. In my case, I checked after my adoption, the surgery the shelter did for my boy, costs over 3000 at a private vet. And I am sure he is not the most expensive one. So in a way they need to average cost for all the dogs. I am not trying to justify their price tag. But to me, I'd be willing to pay to help them provide more funding and help more dogs, if they are indeed put animals at the center of their heart.

Good luck on your journey with dogs. I really wish you will have more positive experience in the future. And thank you for paying attention to these wonderful creatures!
Just to add, my second rescued dog will come from international.
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1374 posts
1036 upvotes
British Columbia
Eileen7424 wrote: Your response demonstrates my points. People who are right for shelter dogs won't feel hurt when they get rejected. They would feel super happy about it, because that means the dog finds a home and they can help another dog. If there is no dog available, isn't that the best thing for our best friends? They also won't have the need to prove how hard it's to get a rescued dog and there is nothing wrong with their applications.
No where did I say I was hurt for being rejected? I understand there are very few out there. I just gave up trying to find a young small female dog. That's all.

It is hard to get a rescue dog. I'm not "proving" anything, just stating facts applicable to this area. Sorry if you dont like it...?

I have no issues whatsoever with the process of adopting a dog. It can be tough but I understand the reasons. I was happy to do home visits etc.

I'm not sure why you are trying to build up my posts into something they aren't.
Newbie
Sep 12, 2017
15 posts
2 upvotes
Karala wrote: No where did I say I was hurt for being rejected? I understand there are very few out there. I just gave up trying to find a young small female dog. That's all.

It is hard to get a rescue dog. I'm not "proving" anything, just stating facts applicable to this area. Sorry if you dont like it...?

I have no issues whatsoever with the process of adopting a dog. It can be tough but I understand the reasons. I was happy to do home visits etc.

I'm not sure why you are trying to build up my posts into something they aren't.
Again Good Luck!
Deal Addict
Jan 20, 2004
1210 posts
150 upvotes
GTA
Didn’t read the thread. But I have a rescue. Best dog ever. She seems like she is grateful and appreciative of being with us. It was work though, she was low self esteemed and low confidence when we adopted her.

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