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Glue down Cork floor tiles

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[OP]
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Nov 1, 2006
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Glue down Cork floor tiles

Does anybody know of a good supplier of glue down cork tile flooring in the GTA? I found some sources of cork planks but these are laminate and not recommended for kitchens/bathrooms or anywhere they might get wet.
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Nov 9, 2008
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https://www.cancork.com

Ordered from them a few years ago and installed glue down cork in our kitchen. Good product, great price.

We bought the recommended cork glue and urethane locally in Toronto
[OP]
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Nov 1, 2006
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Wow! I'm really surprised that more people are not using Cork flooring (inferred from the lack of response to this thread!). In my experience, Cork is (one of) the best flooring material available today. It is warm, quiet, almost indestructible, (almost) maintenance free and attractive.
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Oct 6, 2010
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Jimbobs wrote: Wow! I'm really surprised that more people are not using Cork flooring (inferred from the lack of response to this thread!). In my experience, Cork is (one of) the best flooring material available today. It is warm, quiet, almost indestructible, (almost) maintenance free and attractive.
And in some cases, ridiculous expensive. I was looking at getting the dark rum from Torley's and it was almost $6-7/sqft. So if you have a 1000sqft to do.... All the other types were just plain ugly. I'm not a fan of a lot of cork pattern, too ugly.
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[OP]
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Nov 1, 2006
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koffey wrote: And in some cases, ridiculous expensive. I was looking at getting the dark rum from Torley's and it was almost $6-7/sqft. So if you have a 1000sqft to do.... All the other types were just plain ugly. I'm not a fan of a lot of cork pattern, too ugly.
That is expensive! I just had a look at their site and didn't see any glue down cork tiles. For kitchens and washrooms, glue down is essential.

So far I've found two sources:

1. (as mentioned above by jacquesstrap) https://www.cancork.com
2. http://www.prettyfloor.com/

Based on those, I'm expecting to pay $3 - $3.50 a square foot delivered. Shipping is going to add almost $1 a square foot for my small order :(
Deal Addict
Nov 9, 2008
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Jimbobs wrote: That is expensive! I just had a look at their site and didn't see any glue down cork tiles. For kitchens and washrooms, glue down is essential.

So far I've found two sources:

1. (as mentioned above by jacquesstrap) https://www.cancork.com
2. http://www.prettyfloor.com/

Based on those, I'm expecting to pay $3 - $3.50 a square foot delivered. Shipping is going to add almost $1 a square foot for my small order :(
For reference, we bought the Leather Glue Down tiles from Cancork for $1.99 / sq foot back in late 2012. We only needed 150 sq ft.

Bought Wakol D 3540 Adhesive and the Loba WS 2K Supra Satin finish from Value Wood Floors (106 Advance Rd, Etobicoke. This is their corporate retail store).

This floor stood up for many years with lots of abuse, including a cat. We re-did our kitchen in 2016 and I was sad to see the cork floor go. It was in as good shape as the day we installed it.
[OP]
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Nov 1, 2006
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Toronto
jacquesstrap wrote: For reference, we bought the Leather Glue Down tiles from Cancork for $1.99 / sq foot back in late 2012. We only needed 150 sq ft.

Bought Wakol D 3540 Adhesive and the Loba WS 2K Supra Satin finish from Value Wood Floors (106 Advance Rd, Etobicoke. This is their corporate retail store).

This floor stood up for many years with lots of abuse, including a cat. We re-did our kitchen in 2016 and I was sad to see the cork floor go. It was in as good shape as the day we installed it.
The first cork floor I laid was over 40 years ago and I believe it is still there today! A couple of early lessons: one day a sharp knife fell off a table and hit the floor in such a way that it stood vertically. I pulled the knife straight out and laid it on the table. When I looked back at the floor, I could not find any sign of damage at all - and I searched for it! Another time, a woman wearing stilettos walked in. After she left, I looked for damage and, same story, none to be found! It was a bullet proof floor and so soft, warm and comfortable.
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Oct 6, 2010
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Jimbobs wrote: That is expensive! I just had a look at their site and didn't see any glue down cork tiles. For kitchens and washrooms, glue down is essential.

So far I've found two sources:

1. (as mentioned above by jacquesstrap) https://www.cancork.com
2. http://www.prettyfloor.com/

Based on those, I'm expecting to pay $3 - $3.50 a square foot delivered. Shipping is going to add almost $1 a square foot for my small order :(
I don't think they produce it anymore. Torly's has a few 'divisions' in which they supply other flooring products. For example, some of their laminate is sold as quick step but it's a Torly's product. The abuse cork can take is amazing and one of the reasons why I wanted to use it, but it just wasn't cost effective as it would have blown my budget. There was a shop on Dundas asking $8-9/sqft! Mind you, the townline rum isn't a peel/glue and stick in the traditional sense. It's a tongue/grove plank installation. I went with a cork underlay for my hardwood which was $60/roll. Yikes.
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Jan 11, 2007
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In retrospect should have done this rather then laminate in basement but lesson learned.

Would this look weird outside of a basement?
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dreaderus wrote: In retrospect should have done this rather then laminate in basement but lesson learned.

Would this look weird outside of a basement?
IMO, Cork looks great anywhere. It's like a hardwood floor but quieter, warmer and less maintenance. It can be used in any room.
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Jan 11, 2007
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Jimbobs wrote: IMO, Cork looks great anywhere. It's like a hardwood floor but quieter, warmer and less maintenance. It can be used in any room.
Yeah the hardwood in my upstairs is a bit old and an ugly brown would love something cooler at some point.
[OP]
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koffey wrote: ... I went with a cork underlay for my hardwood which was $60/roll. Yikes.
As a matter of curiousity, what thickness underlay did you use?
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I believe it was 6mm.
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koffey wrote: I believe it was 6mm.
Added a $1 a sq. ft.? But I bet it was worth it in terms of warmth and quietness :)
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Jimbobs wrote: Added a $1 a sq. ft.? But I bet it was worth it in terms of warmth and quietness :)
Best underlayment I even used. The difference is amazing, more so in the basement.
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we want to redo the bedrooms/landing upstairs (all currently carpet) with hardwood or cork. We are not doing the work outselves. when i looked local stores (waterloo ontario) the price for cork was equal to the really high end hardwood. INstallation price was fixed per sqft and didn't differ from cork to wood.

Originally we'd read online that cork was softer and able to stand up to abuse better than wood.

But both local stores said it was less durable than hardwood.

What's the current concensus on this?
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Nov 1, 2006
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Kevinck wrote: we want to redo the bedrooms/landing upstairs (all currently carpet) with hardwood or cork. We are not doing the work outselves. when i looked local stores (waterloo ontario) the price for cork was equal to the really high end hardwood. INstallation price was fixed per sqft and didn't differ from cork to wood.

Originally we'd read online that cork was softer and able to stand up to abuse better than wood.

But both local stores said it was less durable than hardwood.

What's the current concensus on this?
Cork will definitely stand up to normal wear and tear. In my experience, it will do so much better than hardwood floors. Personally, I don't think that hardwood stands up to abuse but cork does.

There are two types of cork floor: floating floor and glue down tiles. The floating floor type typically planks consist of three layers: cork underlayment, HDF (high density fiberboard) and the cork surface layer. Because the HDF will absorb water and swell, this type of floor should not be used in washrooms or kitchens. Glue down tiles can be used anywhere including washrooms and kitchens.

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