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GMAT or GRE for Lawyer?

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 3rd, 2020 9:49 pm
[OP]
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Mar 25, 2020
4 posts

GMAT or GRE for Lawyer?

I am likely going to stay in Canada, but would consider top schools in the US for an MBA. I’m a corporate lawyer at a top Canadian firm right now, and my undergrad is in business from a top business school. I have about 3 years of work experience.

I want to apply to MBA programs, and I’m starting to think about whether I should write the GMAT or GRE. I wrote the LSAT for law school back in 2014 and scored in the 91st percentile.

I took a diagnostic GMAT today without any studying and scored 640. I struggled quite a bit with the quant but the verbal was familiar to me.

I’d be looking to transition out of law and into strategy consulting/similar after MBA.

Any insight on which, if any of the two, would be better for me to write?

Thanks in advance!
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Aug 9, 2010
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Waterloo
SpecterH wrote: I am likely going to stay in Canada, but would consider top schools in the US for an MBA. I’m a corporate lawyer at a top Canadian firm right now, and my undergrad is in business from a top business school. I have about 3 years of work experience.

I want to apply to MBA programs, and I’m starting to think about whether I should write the GMAT or GRE. I wrote the LSAT for law school back in 2014 and scored in the 91st percentile.

I took a diagnostic GMAT today without any studying and scored 640. I struggled quite a bit with the quant but the verbal was familiar to me.

I’d be looking to transition out of law and into strategy consulting/similar after MBA.

Any insight on which, if any of the two, would be better for me to write?

Thanks in advance!
I did the GRE last year and got into McGill’s MBA for the 2020 intake. Business background with 4 years of experience in tech sales and partnerships.

Between the two I’d definitely recommend doing the GRE over the GMAT as the quant sections are easier, whereas the verbal/writing sections are harder. If you’re like me you’ll have no trouble with the essay writing and can get by through brushing up on some of the arcane vocabulary that may appear on the test.

Either way I’d definitely recommend spending most of your time studying quant if it’s your weakest area as it’ll be crucial to attaining a high and balanced score - this is especially key if you’re aiming for top US schools. The concepts aren’t hard (they’re grade 9-10 level, really) - it’s the application that’s tricky, especially given the test pressure and time constraints.

PM me if you want more tips from my experience but you should be able to figure it out. Give yourself a few months of consistent studying and make sure you double down on your weakest areas. Learn the question formats and test-taking strategies; I’d say that you’re tested just as much on HOW to take tests as what you know.

And remember, your score isn’t everything - your wholistic application and, most importantly in my opinion, your story is what schools are considering.

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