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[Amazon.ca] Google mesh wifi, 3 hubs $234 ALL TIME LOW

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 14th, 2021 1:52 pm
Banned
Jan 12, 2021
7 posts
6 upvotes
I am very naive to this, so please pardon my dumb question. Would this work through brick walls or just work for the houses with wooden structure. I live in a condo that we share internet with the next door. The reception in my condo is not great, esp in the bedroom.
Member
Jun 14, 2008
477 posts
404 upvotes
MontrealBonjour wrote: This is the best router I have ever used and this is coming from someone who has gone through the majority of router brand in the $200-400 range over the years. While all other brands either had some sort of technical issue down the road, the Google Mesh WIFI system has been the most reliable and fastest system out there over the 1.5 years of ownership. I will never buy anything else. I paid almost $400 with tax for mine when I got it, so $234 is a steal.
Have you used orbi pro (rbk50)? Trying to decide between the two. Thanks
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2013
779 posts
537 upvotes
Waterloo
I asked this a couple of pages back but it’s been buried to history...

Can anyone explain if there is a big difference between this and this tp link mesh system (https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07VPW ... _564952780). I don’t have nest, my router and extender are tp’s, and I’ve always been a fan of the brand. If the tp would work just as well for my needs, I’d rather purchase it...tia!
Jr. Member
Jul 6, 2007
104 posts
221 upvotes
GTA
Having some trouble setting these up. I'm trying to hardwire each point back to the Rogers modem that is in the basement. House already has ethernet wiring going to it. Seems though I can't connect both directly to the Rogers modem that is already in bridge mode for some reason.
Deal Addict
Jun 20, 2020
2689 posts
2212 upvotes
Toronto
rezz0098 wrote: Having some trouble setting these up. I'm trying to hardwire each point back to the Rogers modem that is in the basement. House already has ethernet wiring going to it. Seems though I can't connect both directly to the Rogers modem that is already in bridge mode for some reason.
Since the modem is in bridge mode, the other two wifi points will have to be wired directly to the primary wifi point using a switch

https://support.google.com/wifi/answer/7215624?hl=en-CA

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point → and so on.

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point→ Switch → Google Wifi point(s)

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point → Switch → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point → Google Wifi point → Switch → Google Wifi point→ Google Wifi point
Newbie
Sep 23, 2008
71 posts
141 upvotes
Toronto
rezz0098 wrote: Having some trouble setting these up. I'm trying to hardwire each point back to the Rogers modem that is in the basement. House already has ethernet wiring going to it. Seems though I can't connect both directly to the Rogers modem that is already in bridge mode for some reason.
Once you're in bridge mode, you'll only be able to connect the router node to the Rogers modem. Then you'd connect the other Google AP node(s) to the Google router. Once in bridge mode, the Rogers modem won't do switching/routing for ports 2-4.

Make sense?
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Jr. Member
Jul 6, 2007
104 posts
221 upvotes
GTA
slapthefat wrote: Once you're in bridge mode, you'll only be able to connect the router node to the Rogers modem. Then you'd connect the other Google AP node(s) to the Google router. Once in bridge mode, the Rogers modem won't do switching/routing for ports 2-4.

Make sense?
If I turn off Wifi on the Rogers router but allow DHCP, so not technically bridge, would I be able to plug in the wifi points that way? Rogers modem will assign IPs while the Google Wifi will act as access points. My only question is, if they are set that way, will they still work together to transfer a device from one AP to the other seemlessly then?
Jr. Member
Jul 6, 2007
104 posts
221 upvotes
GTA
Dhanushan wrote: Since the modem is in bridge mode, the other two wifi points will have to be wired directly to the primary wifi point using a switch

https://support.google.com/wifi/answer/7215624?hl=en-CA

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point → and so on.

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point→ Switch → Google Wifi point(s)

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point → Switch → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point → Google Nest Wifi router or Google Wifi point

Modem → Google Nest Wifi router or primary Wifi point → Google Wifi point → Switch → Google Wifi point→ Google Wifi point
Is there a way where Modem > Google Wifi 1 and Modem > Google Wifi 2 makes sense. House was wired in a way where all ethernet connections go back down to the basement. It's easy for me to plug them into two different spots in the house.
Deal Addict
Jun 20, 2020
2689 posts
2212 upvotes
Toronto
rezz0098 wrote: If I turn off Wifi on the Rogers router but allow DHCP, so not technically bridge, would I be able to plug in the wifi points that way? Rogers modem will assign IPs while the Google Wifi will act as access points. My only question is, if they are set that way, will they still work together to transfer a device from one AP to the other seemlessly then?
rezz0098 wrote: Is there a way where Modem > Google Wifi 1 and Modem > Google Wifi 2 makes sense. House was wired in a way where all ethernet connections go back down to the basement. It's easy for me to plug them into two different spots in the house.
Mesh will not work.

"For correct operation as a mesh point, a Google Nest or Google Wifi point should be on the network address subnet that is created by the primary router. This means the Wifi point should always be wired downstream from the primary."

https://support.google.com/wifi/answer/ ... ame-switch
Jr. Member
Jul 6, 2007
104 posts
221 upvotes
GTA
Dhanushan wrote: Mesh will not work.

"For correct operation as a mesh point, a Google Nest or Google Wifi point should be on the network address subnet that is created by the primary router. This means the Wifi point should always be wired downstream from the primary."

https://support.google.com/wifi/answer/ ... ame-switch
If they are both set up as APs with wired connections, is it just seemless handoff that wouldn't happen? Or are their any other downsides? I'm assuming wifi speeds will still be faster.
Newbie
Jan 7, 2021
9 posts
1 upvote
Performance wise, they are probably similar. TP-Link will work fine. Some people may be concerned with privacy and information shared with TP-Link. But I think Google is just as evil. I bought X20 on sale myself. So far, so good.
glfrboy wrote: I asked this a couple of pages back but it’s been buried to history...

Can anyone explain if there is a big difference between this and this tp link mesh system (https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07VPW ... _564952780). I don’t have nest, my router and extender are tp’s, and I’ve always been a fan of the brand. If the tp would work just as well for my needs, I’d rather purchase it...tia!
Deal Addict
Jun 20, 2020
2689 posts
2212 upvotes
Toronto
rezz0098 wrote: If they are both set up as APs with wired connections, is it just seemless handoff that wouldn't happen? Or are their any other downsides? I'm assuming wifi speeds will still be faster.
I don't think these Wifi points have "Access Point" mode
You can put them each in "bridge mode" and there will be no "seemless handoff" between them
Yes wifi speeds "should" be faster but the devices connecting may not connect to the closet wifi point

from https://support.google.com/wifi/answer/6240987
If it’s in bridge mode, you’ll lose some functionality:
  • Priority device will be unavailable
  • DNS can’t be edited
  • WAN settings can’t be edited
  • Guest Wi-Fi will be unavailable
  • Wi-Fi speed results in Network check will be unavailable (But download and upload results will still work.)
  • Philips Hue pairing and controls in the Google Wifi app

Additionally, bridge mode disables many of Google Nest Wifi and Google Wifi’s security protections. This is because your upstream router (the modem/router combo in the above scenario) is the one performing DNS steering, packet inspection, executable patching, and other security functions.

Google Nest Wifi and Google Wifi’s automatic security updates maximize your privacy and security. Their protective features are most effective, and in some cases, only effective when all traffic passes through your router or primary Wifi point (instead of another router).
Deal Addict
Jun 20, 2020
2689 posts
2212 upvotes
Toronto
rezz0098 wrote: If they are both set up as APs with wired connections, is it just seemless handoff that wouldn't happen? Or are their any other downsides? I'm assuming wifi speeds will still be faster.
I would recommend getting TP-Link Omada AP's instead of using these wifi points as APs
These support seamless roaming using the free controller software

https://www.amazon.ca/TP-Link-Wireless- ... B0781YXFBT
Deal Fanatic
May 25, 2009
5470 posts
1745 upvotes
Toronto
What's the difference between these wifi hubs, and just adding another router as a wifi extender?
Newbie
Feb 7, 2007
25 posts
5 upvotes
Calgary
Well the Google mesh was worse. One puck is fine, other one no matter where I plug it in doesn't recognize it's hardwired. Think I'm done screwing around with these mesh setups. Neither is that great for my house.
Member
Jun 14, 2008
477 posts
404 upvotes
antonv wrote: I couldn’t get seamless roaming to work on the 3 EAP245 I bought. Returned them and got the Tplink M9 and it’s working great.
Did you compare speeds with eap245 vs m9?
Which one is better for speed?
Newbie
Dec 20, 2014
16 posts
3 upvotes
Wpg
kellyahlers wrote: Well the Google mesh was worse. One puck is fine, other one no matter where I plug it in doesn't recognize it's hardwired. Think I'm done screwing around with these mesh setups. Neither is that great for my house.
According to a random answer on Amazon (which I can't seem to find again), you gotta do mesh first for the points, then hardwire. Not an expert, just passing what I saw.
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Last edited by 61three on Jan 13th, 2021 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Jan 8, 2017
201 posts
44 upvotes
Dhanushan wrote: I would recommend getting TP-Link Omada AP's instead of using these wifi points as APs
These support seamless roaming using the free controller software

https://www.amazon.ca/TP-Link-Wireless- ... B0781YXFBT
I have Rogers white modem which has failed giving me signal throughout my home 4000sqft 3stories Will this work for my needs ? I have 4 smart TVs, 24/7 wifi networking system, smart hubs, Alexa, Google home, Apple tv, fire stick and Chromecast ?

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