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[Amazon.ca] Google mesh wifi, 3 hubs $234 ALL TIME LOW

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Newbie
User avatar
Dec 22, 2019
35 posts
102 upvotes
In for one, thanks OP!

In case it hasn't been discussed - Mesh wifi systems can be troublesome for IoT/smart home devices. Products like smart thermostats, switches, light-bulbs etc. I found this from an online source:

"Google WiFi Dropping Connection? The Google system by default tries to move 2.4GHz devices to a 5GHz connection. Since IoT [smart home devices] can only connect on 2.4GHz, this causes an almost infinite loop of your Devices connecting and disconnecting. "

So after a bit of searching, it seems the workaround for this is to create a 'Guest Network' on Google Wifi with a different SSID (wifi name). The guest network preferentially broadcasts in 2.4GHz. Personally, I run 5 Mysa thermostats in my home and was worried about their connectivity.

I also reached out to MYSA for their advice and they reiterated

"Hi Jack, Our customers experience a bit of trouble with the mesh systems as the networks cannot be split. The workaround is to create a Guest network - which would usually be a 2.4GHz network and connect your Mysas to that network.
Warmly,

Anna O.
Mysa Customer Care Team"


I hope this helps any of you guys and gals who were having these issues.
Cheers
Jr. Member
Jun 13, 2020
149 posts
123 upvotes
dealguru99 wrote: Did you compare speeds with eap245 vs m9?
Which one is better for speed?
At spots where I was getting really bad speeds I now get 250mbps all over my house now and that’s with only 2 hubs, will most likely buy two more so I can get wifi outside the house.
Deal Addict
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Dec 24, 2005
2193 posts
2691 upvotes
Toronto
Has anyone done real world testing and comparison of Google Wifi (2020) vs Nest Wifi? I realize the latter doubles as a smart speaker but is the actual range and speed any better? If it's not then the price premium is really only for the smart speaker, in which case, it's cheaper to just get a Home Mini.
Nothing to see here folks...
Newbie
Jan 25, 2013
32 posts
11 upvotes
kellyahlers wrote: Well the Google mesh was worse. One puck is fine, other one no matter where I plug it in doesn't recognize it's hardwired. Think I'm done screwing around with these mesh setups. Neither is that great for my house.
Since you have wired already in your house, the best solution is buying two or three access point like Ubiquiti or TP-Link brand and connect them directly to router or modem wired. It will be much more stable then the wireless connection between PUCKs.
Sr. Member
Nov 30, 2006
515 posts
195 upvotes
Toronto
I’m with Bell and have my current router setup to reserve IP addresses for devices and have a couple open ports for different apps. Can I continue to use the Bell device as my router and also have these extend my wifi range, or do these devices need to be set as the router.
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Feb 1, 2009
1246 posts
387 upvotes
myboat wrote: Since you have wired already in your house, the best solution is buying two or three access point like Ubiquiti or TP-Link brand and connect them directly to router or modem wired. It will be much more stable then the wireless connection between PUCKs.
That will enhance wifi signal coverage for sure. However, if I understand mesh's advantages correctly, a multi-AP network won't automatically hand your device over from one AP to another based on how strong/weak the signals are, correct? Then it'll be up for your device to decide to let go of the current wifi signal (since it's too weak) and switch over to a closer, better signal strength AP.
If my sanity has to go, it is my job to keep its absence to myself. :D
Newbie
Sep 1, 2014
77 posts
42 upvotes
Ajax, ON
I have used many routers /extenders etc in my house and nothing really helped much. Google Wifi (2 points) was the only thing that finally worked. Great price here too, and so, you get my upvote OP!
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Feb 2, 2010
1025 posts
868 upvotes
beeknight wrote: That will enhance wifi signal coverage for sure. However, if I understand mesh's advantages correctly, a multi-AP network won't automatically hand your device over from one AP to another based on how strong/weak the signals are, correct? Then it'll be up for your device to decide to let go of the current wifi signal (since it's too weak) and switch over to a closer, better signal strength AP.
This is from the TP-Link configuration guide for my 225's:

The controller dynamically monitors the link quality of every associated
client. When the client’s current link quality drops below the predefined
threshold and there are some other APs with better signal, the current AP
issues an 11v roaming suggestion to the client.
With Force-disassociation disabled, the AP only issues a roaming
suggestion, but whether to roam or nor is determined by the client.
With Force-disassociation enabled, the AP not only issues a roaming
suggestion but also disassociates the client after a while. Thus the client
is supported to re-associate to a better AP. This function is recommended
when there are sticky clients that don‘t roam.


So it suggests a better AP to the client and will force a disassociation if you configure it to do so
Deal Addict
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Feb 1, 2009
1246 posts
387 upvotes
Tapout123 wrote: This is from the TP-Link configuration guide for my 225's:

The controller dynamically monitors the link quality of every associated
client. When the client’s current link quality drops below the predefined
threshold and there are some other APs with better signal, the current AP
issues an 11v roaming suggestion to the client.
With Force-disassociation disabled, the AP only issues a roaming
suggestion, but whether to roam or nor is determined by the client.
With Force-disassociation enabled, the AP not only issues a roaming
suggestion but also disassociates the client after a while. Thus the client
is supported to re-associate to a better AP. This function is recommended
when there are sticky clients that don‘t roam.


So it suggests a better AP to the client and will force a disassociation if you configure it to do so
Cool! Thanks I learnt something new. :)

Just curious -- Does Mesh do something different than this?
If my sanity has to go, it is my job to keep its absence to myself. :D
Member
Aug 26, 2008
384 posts
168 upvotes
Calgary, AB
loonieryan wrote: Has anyone done real world testing and comparison of Google Wifi (2020) vs Nest Wifi? I realize the latter doubles as a smart speaker but is the actual range and speed any better? If it's not then the price premium is really only for the smart speaker, in which case, it's cheaper to just get a Home Mini.
No, but there should be no difference in most real life situation: non-fiber internet (300Mbps or lower), and one/two-antenna devices (eg smartphone or laptop):
both system are of the same Wifi5 generation, and differ by number of antennas only.
The posted speed difference I attribute to an ideal test with multi-antenna recipient device and high-speed internet (650Mbps+)

Google Wifi Nest Wifi
Speed rating AC1200 AC2200
Wi-Fi standard Wi-Fi 5 Wi-Fi 5
Antennas 2X2 4X4
Range 1,500 sqf per point 1,600 sqf per point
Top wireless transfer speed, 5 feet 451 Mbps 612 Mbps

https://www.cnet.com/news/nest-wifi-vs- ... different/
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Feb 2, 2010
1025 posts
868 upvotes
beeknight wrote: Cool! Thanks I learnt something new. :)

Just curious -- Does Mesh do something different than this?
You're welcome! It just so happened I was reading this a few days ago and remembered this setting.

I think it all depends on who's mesh. Some will auto-handoff clients as the signal moves, others wont. Of interest, you can set up the TP-Link EAP AP's in a mesh as well.

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