Computers & Electronics

Google Wifi or Linksys Velop?

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  • Aug 17th, 2017 12:04 pm
[OP]
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Nov 7, 2003
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Google Wifi or Linksys Velop?

Linksys Velop AC6600 is quite expensive, but supposedly provides the best performance when compared to Google Wifi. I'm assuming both devices support 802.11 AC over 2.4ghz and 5ghz right? In the real world, is the Velop significantly faster than Google Wifi?
18 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
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Netgear Orbi?

The problem with the Velop, is that they only have an ethernet backbone, so each access point has to be connected in a traditional sense, with an ethernet cable. If you don't have an ethernet cable in the location you want to put the access point, it won't work (or so I learned when I was looking into them all).

Google WiFi sucks apparently, so don't go with that. There is only one channel, so inter-AP traffic goes over the same channel as your everyday internet. Netgear Orbi has a dedicated channel just for inter-AP traffic, so won't compete with your Youtube etc.

Heard good things about Netgear Orbi, maybe look into that.
Jr. Member
Oct 26, 2008
118 posts
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Saint-Laurent
+1 on the Netgear Orbi. Purchase one a month ago and very satisfied with range and speed.
Newbie
Sep 26, 2016
3 posts
I am happy with the Linksys Velop and have had no problems so far
Newbie
Mar 8, 2008
44 posts
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Newmarket, Ontario
I've installed Google wifi a handful of times, no issues, they can be hardwired or wireless which is nice (setup is wireless, but can be wired after the fact and 'changes' to a wired access point). Orbi is the fastest but gets pricey if you need a third point.
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Feb 6, 2004
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I can also vouch for Orbi, the only wifi system better than Orbi would be Amplifi HD but those are very pricy (about $600)
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[OP]
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eblend wrote: Netgear Orbi?

The problem with the Velop, is that they only have an ethernet backbone, so each access point has to be connected in a traditional sense, with an ethernet cable. If you don't have an ethernet cable in the location you want to put the access point, it won't work (or so I learned when I was looking into them all).

Google WiFi sucks apparently, so don't go with that. There is only one channel, so inter-AP traffic goes over the same channel as your everyday internet. Netgear Orbi has a dedicated channel just for inter-AP traffic, so won't compete with your Youtube etc.

Heard good things about Netgear Orbi, maybe look into that.
Google Wifi sucks? Damn, I just bought it, but haven't opened it yet. It's going for a great price at the moment. You mean one channel per frequency or what? I don't mind paying more, but I need to be able to justify it. Netgear Orbi is pretty expensive and in a similar range as the Linksys Velop. Google Wifi does work on the 5ghz frequency right?
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Jul 21, 2005
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Sgt_Strider wrote: Google Wifi sucks? Damn, I just bought it, but haven't opened it yet. It's going for a great price at the moment. You mean one channel per frequency or what? I don't mind paying more, but I need to be able to justify it. Netgear Orbi is pretty expensive and in a similar range as the Linksys Velop. Google Wifi does work on the 5ghz frequency right?
I read this article in its entirety, give it a go and see. It goes well into everything.

http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-w ... king-kits/
[OP]
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eblend wrote: Netgear Orbi?

The problem with the Velop, is that they only have an ethernet backbone, so each access point has to be connected in a traditional sense, with an ethernet cable. If you don't have an ethernet cable in the location you want to put the access point, it won't work (or so I learned when I was looking into them all).

Google WiFi sucks apparently, so don't go with that. There is only one channel, so inter-AP traffic goes over the same channel as your everyday internet. Netgear Orbi has a dedicated channel just for inter-AP traffic, so won't compete with your Youtube etc.

Heard good things about Netgear Orbi, maybe look into that.
Ok, I'm leaning on getting the Orbi, but unless I'm mistaken, the Orbi also doesn't allow the user to select either 2.4ghz or 5ghz?

Also, where is the cheapest place to buy additional Orbis to add to my network?

Basically my goal is to cover the entire house plus front and backyards with 5ghz coverage. In total that's probably 5000-5500 square feet. I would prefer my devices to connect to 5ghz whenever possible.
Last edited by Sgt_Strider on Aug 17th, 2017 2:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
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You know what guys, I'm starting to think mesh networking may not be for me. I love the concept, but after spending some time researching the matter, I don't understand why these mesh networking solutions don't offer advance users to force 5ghz on all devices. I'm starting to think that it'll be cheaper and easier to just buy 3 routers to blanket the entire house with 5ghz coverage.
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Jul 21, 2005
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Sgt_Strider wrote: You know what guys, I'm starting to think mesh networking may not be for me. I love the concept, but after spending some time researching the matter, I don't understand why these mesh networking solutions don't offer advance users to force 5ghz on all devices. I'm starting to think that it'll be cheaper and easier to just buy 3 routers to blanket the entire house with 5ghz coverage.
Problem with that is you will have 3 different networks, even if they have the same SSID. You may be connected to the one in the basement, even if you are sitting right next to an access point upstairs. I don't have an Orbi so I can't comment, but usually most dual band routers broadcast two SSIDs, 2.4ghz and 5ghz, so it will be like...Orbi_2.4 and Orbi_5 or something like that, you just connect all your devices that support 5 to 5, and 2.4 to 2.4. Nothing really that complicated.
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Mar 19, 2006
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eblend wrote: Netgear Orbi?

The problem with the Velop, is that they only have an ethernet backbone, so each access point has to be connected in a traditional sense, with an ethernet cable. If you don't have an ethernet cable in the location you want to put the access point, it won't work (or so I learned when I was looking into them all).

Google WiFi sucks apparently, so don't go with that. There is only one channel, so inter-AP traffic goes over the same channel as your everyday internet. Netgear Orbi has a dedicated channel just for inter-AP traffic, so won't compete with your Youtube etc.

Heard good things about Netgear Orbi, maybe look into that.
The bolded statement is incorrect. The Linksys Velop is a tri-band system, which includes one 2.4GHz band and two 5GHz bands. One of the two 5GHz bands is used exclusively for the backbone (wireless backhaul), so you have a dedicated 'line' for all the traffic going between the Velop units. Going with a wired backbone (wired backhaul) is an OPTION you can use.

I would recommend either the Velop or Eero Pro (3 base version).

Don't do the three router way, you're losing so much bandwidth due to overhead.
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Feb 9, 2006
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Brampton
X20A wrote: The bolded statement is incorrect. The Linksys Velop is a tri-band system, which includes one 2.4GHz band and two 5GHz bands. One of the two 5GHz bands is used exclusively for the backbone (wireless backhaul), so you have a dedicated 'line' for all the traffic going between the Velop units. Going with a wired backbone (wired backhaul) is an OPTION you can use.

I would recommend either the Velop or Eero Pro (3 base version).

Don't do the three router way, you're losing so much bandwidth due to overhead.
Can you explain that?
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Mar 19, 2006
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tebore wrote: Can you explain that?
The TL;DR version is basically that you're using the same 'network' (same SSID) for both your internet traffic and your intra-network traffic (communications between the two or more routers). Effectively halving your bandwidth, as wireless is not a duplex connection like hardwired Ethernet. Unless you plan on having different SSIDs or going fully wired between those routers, you're going to have a bad time.

Link to CNET's article if you want to read a bit more in-depth.

That's the reason why devices like the Velop that have a dedicated wireless backhaul will be better for intra-network (between Velop units) speeds.
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Jul 21, 2005
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X20A wrote: The bolded statement is incorrect. The Linksys Velop is a tri-band system, which includes one 2.4GHz band and two 5GHz bands. One of the two 5GHz bands is used exclusively for the backbone (wireless backhaul), so you have a dedicated 'line' for all the traffic going between the Velop units. Going with a wired backbone (wired backhaul) is an OPTION you can use.

I would recommend either the Velop or Eero Pro (3 base version).

Don't do the three router way, you're losing so much bandwidth due to overhead.
Weird, I could have sworn I read that it didn't have Wireless backhaul, I stand corrected. Good to know.
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Feb 9, 2006
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Brampton
X20A wrote: The TL;DR version is basically that you're using the same 'network' (same SSID) for both your internet traffic and your intra-network traffic (communications between the two or more routers). Effectively halving your bandwidth, as wireless is not a duplex connection like hardwired Ethernet. Unless you plan on having different SSIDs or going fully wired between those routers, you're going to have a bad time.

Link to CNET's article if you want to read a bit more in-depth.

That's the reason why devices like the Velop that have a dedicated wireless backhaul will be better for intra-network (between Velop units) speeds.
So what you said isn't true then because the OP hasn't mentioned not using a wired backhaul in that 3 router situation. There's more than 1 way to do multiple APs/ Router. Repeater Bridge is just one of the worst, but necessary in some cases.
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tebore wrote: So what you said isn't true then because the OP hasn't mentioned not using a wired backhaul in that 3 router situation. There's more than 1 way to do multiple APs/ Router. Repeater Bridge is just one of the worst, but necessary in some cases.
I wasn't so much responding to OP, than tacking onto what eblend was saying earlier about running multiple wireless networks. In any case, there's not a lot of options for running three routers concurrently while being un-managed, losing bandwidth, and/or going wired. Unless OP plans to run some of sort of managed system with the routers running in AP mode. Some config required in addition to simpler things like turning off DHCP, etc.

However, since OPs property is huge (>5000 sq. ft.), the three unit Velop might not even be enough to meet his needs. Probably better to go managed with APs (Ubiquiti), which is also a config headache, haha.

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