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Oct 24, 2005
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GangStarr wrote: While it has been established that eggs contain cholesterol, it has not yet been proven conclusively... that they actually raise the level of serum cholesterol in the human bloodstream.
So one of those egg council creeps got to you huh?
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Jan 27, 2004
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GangStarr wrote: While it has been established that eggs contain cholesterol, it has not yet been proven conclusively... that they actually raise the level of serum cholesterol in the human bloodstream.
blarg wrote: So one of those egg council creeps got to you huh?
Lol good Simpson’s quote. But its true. Sort of.

If you are healthy. Exercise. Have good diet high in fibre and low in saturated fats. Yeah. It won’t do much. Its just protein.

Theres also another variable. Some people genetically just susceptible to having cholesterol levels.

So one guy can eat ham every breakfast and be ok. Another guy might eat ham everyday and have high cholesterol.

Age is a factor too. Along with many other things.
Sr. Member
Oct 22, 2007
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Cough wrote: The ones sold by Costco last for months. But they may be sealed in a gas environment.

Image
Mental. I cant believe there is a market for pre-made hard boiled eggs.
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Oct 22, 2007
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lecale wrote: I'm a savage, I will boil them & leave them at room temp for up to a week & I am not dead yet.
I bought a bunch of chicken thighs on sale and put them in the fridge and was lazy to freeze them until a day before the expiry. Finally opened up the packages to vac seal and freeze and they smelled rank.....I had spent a shitload on these thighs on sale so no way I was gonna toss em even tho they smelled like death. So I froze them anyway into a few separate packs. I unfroze a few weeks later but unfortunately still smelled nasty. I went back and forth on whether to toss or cook..I put em in a bowl, covered it with vinegar for a few mins then rinsed it off.....breaded em, fried em, and covered them in Hakka sauce.....it was delicious and my wife nor I got sick. Did the same thing a few weeks later and same result.
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Feb 4, 2010
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lecale wrote: I like them room temp & they do not actually go bad in all that time. My mother grew up in a rural area without electricity until she was 13 & she tested the limits of non-refrigeration as I grew up lol.

We had chickens & the fresh eggs only went in the fridge 1X a day....you can actually keep raw eggs out at room temp for a week or so as long as they still have their "bloom" on them (a thin coating deposited as they are laid.) Mennonites do this - they scrape any poop off the eggs & let them be at room temp. Also popular to keep eggs at room temps in Europe where organic/field run eggs are more popular. You can't do this with commercial eggs because they are washed & have no bloom to protect them.

And of course if you leave raw commercial eggs in the fridge 3-4 weeks they are still good, they just dehydrate over time. Savage but true!
psyko514 wrote: My first trip overseas was to the Philippines, where I spent 10 weeks and regularly shopped for groceries. I remember my complete surprise when I came across the egg aisle in the grocery store and saw crates of eggs sitting unrefrigerated on the shelf. This was before the days of smartphones so I couldn't look up details on the spot but figured if they sold em like that, it must be safe. Never got sick, of course, and so never bothered to to look up why we refrigerated our eggs here. I think I assumed that it was a psychological thing here, like Canadians would be weirded out by it.

Fast forward 10 weeks later, I'm back home in Canada and decided I no longer needed to refrigerate my eggs, so I'd leave em out on the counter for 7-10 days. I did this for at least a few months and somehow never got sick.

From my understanding (based on what a farmer told me) most countries do NOT put raw eggs in the fridge. They're left in room temperature and last weeks but we use highly processed way of cleaning the eggs which weakens the shell so they have to be refrigerated.

I've only left boiled eggs out overnight because I don't like them cold and the thought of warming them up in the microwave doesn't sound appealing to me.
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Feb 9, 2012
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The__Rock wrote: Mental. I cant believe there is a market for pre-made hard boiled eggs.
Not just pre made, also Peeled and ready to eat. You don't even have to worry about the shell anymore. Smiling Face With Sunglasses
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Feb 7, 2017
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The__Rock wrote: Mental. I cant believe there is a market for pre-made hard boiled eggs.
Gotta admit … these cooked and bagged with long leads on expiry dates creep me out.
More so prob Costco sells them in such large quantities (16 - 2 packs)

But they are far from a new thing. They’ve been around for decades … gas station convenience stores have been selling them since last Century … 2 eggs at a time in a similar little sealed bag right along side their readymade sandwiches etc
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Nov 15, 2008
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tbh the last time I made potato salad I bought a dozen PC Blue Menu hard boiled eggs to cut my labour, because shelling the eggs is the worst part & it worked really well. The expiry date was only 2 weeks out though. It's not just air, there is a bit of water in with the eggs too. Quality of the eggs was excellent. Just for that 1 recipe I think I will keep buying them.
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Jun 24, 2006
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I am pretty sure Costco used the sell like bulk bags of boiled and peeled eggs. Not just the 2 packs.

I remember my in laws always buying them and being disappointed when they stopped carrying them.
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Jun 12, 2008
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psyko514 wrote: My first trip overseas was to the Philippines, where I spent 10 weeks and regularly shopped for groceries. I remember my complete surprise when I came across the egg aisle in the grocery store and saw crates of eggs sitting unrefrigerated on the shelf. This was before the days of smartphones so I couldn't look up details on the spot but figured if they sold em like that, it must be safe. Never got sick, of course, and so never bothered to to look up why we refrigerated our eggs here. I think I assumed that it was a psychological thing here, like Canadians would be weirded out by it.

Fast forward 10 weeks later, I'm back home in Canada and decided I no longer needed to refrigerate my eggs, so I'd leave em out on the counter for 7-10 days. I did this for at least a few months and somehow never got sick.
You can leave fresh from the chicken eggs out on the counter. They don't sell this kind in a store. No refrigeration needed. You absolutely need to refrigerate store bought eggs. Store bought eggs clearly state on the package to keep them refrigerated. Its not psychological. Its science and safe food handling. Has to do with the way they are processed and handled.
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May 9, 2009
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lecale wrote: tbh the last time I made potato salad I bought a dozen PC Blue Menu hard boiled eggs to cut my labour, because shelling the eggs is the worst part & it worked really well. The expiry date was only 2 weeks out though. It's not just air, there is a bit of water in with the eggs too. Quality of the eggs was excellent. Just for that 1 recipe I think I will keep buying them.
I've seen people make a big batch of "egg loaf" in their Instant Pot for potato salad or egg salad. Just crack your eggs in the pot, turn it on for a few mins and then dice up the result. A lot easier then boiling and peeling a bunch of eggs.
zeddy wrote: You can leave fresh from the chicken eggs out on the counter. They don't sell this kind in a store. No refrigeration needed. You absolutely need to refrigerate store bought eggs. Store bought eggs clearly state on the package to keep them refrigerated. Its not psychological. Its science and safe food handling. Has to do with the way they are processed and handled.
Yes, I'm aware now. I didn't say it explicitly but I eventually realized the follow of my ways.
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Nov 15, 2008
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zeddy wrote: You can leave fresh from the chicken eggs out on the counter. They don't sell this kind in a store. No refrigeration needed. You absolutely need to refrigerate store bought eggs. Store bought eggs clearly state on the package to keep them refrigerated. Its not psychological. Its science and safe food handling. Has to do with the way they are processed and handled.
Exactly right. The natural bloom is like a thin matte lacquer. If you pick up an egg hot out of the chicken you will put fingerprints on it because the bloom has not dried. That is the only time you can become aware that the bloom is there, acting like a sealant. This gets washed off with commercial eggs so there is no natural protection on the egg & the egg dehydrates faster & has no protection from naturally-occurring bacteria as the shell is porous.
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May 26, 2022
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We make them as needed. So if I need them today or for lunch tomorrow we make them. But we don’t make a batch for a week or anything like that. I rather have fresh
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Nov 12, 2006
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lecale wrote: tbh the last time I made potato salad I bought a dozen PC Blue Menu hard boiled eggs to cut my labour, because shelling the eggs is the worst part & it worked really well.
I'm more intrigued by the de-shelling method, than their existence.(despite my surprise)

There are a few things to make de-shelling easier, such as do so under water and don't use fresh eggs.
Even still, it can sometimes be imperfect.
I'd love to see the witchcraft they use to get a machine to do it.
Maybe a compressed air jet under the shell?
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Nov 15, 2008
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arisk wrote: I'm more intrigued by the de-shelling method, than their existence.(despite my surprise)

There are a few things to make de-shelling easier, such as do so under water and don't use fresh eggs.
Even still, it can sometimes be imperfect.
I'd love to see the witchcraft they use to get a machine to do it.
Maybe a compressed air jet under the shell?
There is video of egg shelling machines online but the magic happens inside the machine so you can't see it.

I would love to see how they get the membranes off of mandarin orange slices lol.
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Jun 24, 2006
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arisk wrote: I'm more intrigued by the de-shelling method, than their existence.(despite my surprise)

There are a few things to make de-shelling easier, such as do so under water and don't use fresh eggs.
Even still, it can sometimes be imperfect.
I'd love to see the witchcraft they use to get a machine to do it.
Maybe a compressed air jet under the shell?
Crack the shell a bit let them soak in cold water for a bit helps, then peel under running water. You want to get water under that film between shell and egg to separate it.

That said, very fresh eggs are hard to peel. Older eggs are so much nicer to work with,
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Gutty96 wrote: Crack the shell a bit let them soak in cold water for a bit helps, then peel under running water. You want to get water under that film between shell and egg to separate it.

That said, very fresh eggs are hard to peel. Older eggs are so much nicer to work with,
I do all that already, and it works fairly well.
There is always a stubborn one though.

I was commenting more on a machine doing it successfully.
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Jun 24, 2006
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arisk wrote: I do all that already, and it works fairly well.
There is always a stubborn one though.

I was commenting more on a machine doing it successfully.
Oh ya, there always is. That the one that gets torn up so bad you just pop the pieces right in your mouth.
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Feb 7, 2017
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arisk wrote: I'm more intrigued by the de-shelling method, than their existence.(despite my surprise)

There are a few things to make de-shelling easier, such as do so under water and don't use fresh eggs.
Even still, it can sometimes be imperfect.
I'd love to see the witchcraft they use to get a machine to do it.
Maybe a compressed air jet under the shell?
My guess … there’s vinegar involved right from the get go
(Afterall not an issue to the after product … if your egg is already cooked, and your aim is to pickle the egg anyhow)

Vinegar is a natural way to breakdown / thin an eggshell
A bit of vinegar in the rinse
Might just do the trick in aiding the machine in doing its job
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Jun 24, 2006
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PointsHubby wrote: My guess … there’s vinegar involved right from the get go
(Afterall not an issue to the after product … if your egg is already cooked, and your aim is to pickle the egg anyhow)

Vinegar is a natural way to breakdown / thin an eggshell
A bit of vinegar in the rinse
Might just do the trick in aiding the machine in doing its job
I wonder if adding a splash of vinegar to the cold water bath the eggs sit in for a bit would make the shells come off easier?

I am going to try this, and will report back.

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