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Hard to plug in wall outlet

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 25th, 2018 2:25 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 26, 2017
183 posts
78 upvotes

Hard to plug in wall outlet

Very much all my wall outlets are very hard to plug in.
Anybody on same boat?
Can anything good be done to easy up?
14 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 17, 2007
2227 posts
1216 upvotes
Alliston, ON
Are they the Tamper Resistant outlets? If so, they will get easier over time
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 24, 2008
1051 posts
617 upvotes
I understand tamper resistant outlets, but I wish they had made them a little easier to use before requiring them for code!
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
11498 posts
6023 upvotes
Brampton
Good old TR outlets.

1. They will loosen up.
2. They're designed to allow the plug with the larger spade (Most modern plugs have one spade that's every so slightly longer and wider) to go in first (Ever so slightly) to slide open the tamper covers. So when you insert the plug make sure it's straight in so the larger spade engages the the covers first.
Penalty Box
Jun 24, 2015
3867 posts
1134 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
It seems like who ever designed Tamper Proof outlets overlooked the issues people would have especially old people like my nonna who likes to turn on and off things by plugging it in and out
Hi
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4009 posts
1275 upvotes
WFH
tebore wrote: 2. They're designed to allow the plug with the larger spade (Most modern plugs have one spade that's every so slightly longer and wider) to go in first (Ever so slightly) to slide open the tamper covers. So when you insert the plug make sure it's straight in so the larger spade engages the the covers first.
Yeah, the way TR has been implemented is a PITA. The real mystery is why the geniuses that write our code have never required all plugs be equipped with a ground prong regardless whether it is used or not. It's real easy to design a reliable shutter mechanism triggered off the longer ground prong. The mechanism you describe should only be used as a backup for legacy two prong plugs.

On a side note I'm sitting in a building that was completed last year looking into a non-TR outlet on my desk. Are TR outlets not required in commercial buildings?
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
14583 posts
15362 upvotes
Oakville
I just wiggle the plug as I'm plugging that in, which helps move the shutters aside.
Deal Addict
Oct 2, 2013
2194 posts
2097 upvotes
Montreal
dirtmover wrote: Yeah, the way TR has been implemented is a PITA. The real mystery is why the geniuses that write our code have never required all plugs be equipped with a ground prong regardless whether it is used or not. It's real easy to design a reliable shutter mechanism triggered off the longer ground prong. The mechanism you describe should only be used as a backup for legacy two prong plugs.

On a side note I'm sitting in a building that was completed last year looking into a non-TR outlet on my desk. Are TR outlets not required in commercial buildings?
In Quebec TR outlets aren't required if above 1.5M (not sure of the height but it's around 1.5M).
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
6945 posts
4123 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
SquadG wrote: In Quebec TR outlets aren't required if above 1.5M (not sure of the height but it's around 1.5M).
Isn't that awfully high up for most electrical outlets? I wouldn't want a bunch of electrical cords that high up as an eyesore in my home.
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
4139 posts
3398 upvotes
Toronto
tebore wrote: So when you insert the plug make sure it's straight in so the larger spade engages the the covers first.
THIS.

With TR outlets, you can't insert them in at even a slight angle like before. Once you remember to insert the plug straight in, they work okay.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 26, 2017
183 posts
78 upvotes
I think they are not TR outlet. Just the typical outlet as I can see copper through the little gap.
Hard to insert and pull out. With wet or moist lotion fingers, it's like impossible to pull out the shiny cellphone charger.
Sometimes wiggle helps. If it's half that hard, it would be right on. Thought about trying electric lube.
Once it's plugged in, it stays put. Vacuum and mechanic light plug don't fall out that easily.

Many years ago at the old place, the plug could easily fall out even with just a slight hit on the wire.

Bathrooms have TR breaker outlet.
Deal Addict
Oct 2, 2013
2194 posts
2097 upvotes
Montreal
Chickinvic wrote: Isn't that awfully high up for most electrical outlets? I wouldn't want a bunch of electrical cords that high up as an eyesore in my home.
What about emergency lights in an office, or a furnace/cold room with no window?

Outlet above kitchen cabinet for LEDs?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
6945 posts
4123 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
SquadG wrote: What about emergency lights in an office, or a furnace/cold room with no window?

Outlet above kitchen cabinet for LEDs?
That could be one or two outlets in my entire house. Other than that I don't want a bunch of outlets 5 feet from the floor.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
11170 posts
7441 upvotes
Edmonton
TR outlets were (I believe) intended to keep kids from sticking things in outlets and getting zapped. Not as much of a concern in a commercial area, and not if the outlets are higher.

According to my older copy of the code book, you don't need TR receptacles for "inaccessible " outlets for stationary appliances or receptacles > 2m above the floor (Section 26-712(h)). Everything else in a residential installation needs them. They're also required in child-care and pediatric areas of hospitals (26-700(12)). But not in standard commercial installations.

C

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