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Hardware Options for Bi-Fold / Folding Doors

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  • Jul 29th, 2020 11:45 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 15, 2007
602 posts
159 upvotes
Toronto

Hardware Options for Bi-Fold / Folding Doors

I'm looking for some options on a closet door. Previously there were sliding doors where half of the opening would always be blocked. We replaced them with cloth "doors" as a temporary measure until we renovated the room. We are now looking for something nicer that allows access to most of the closet opening.

A barn door is out because the adjacent wall is not as wide as the closet opening and there is a light switch that would be covered if it was left open. I was thinking about a bi-fold or some kind of folding door that opens toward the perpendicular wall. I'm wondering where I can look for good quality hardware options. Most of the bi-fold doors I've ever come across do not operate very smoothly, I'm willing to splurge on hardware that has a good "feel" to it. I would likely make my own door.

There will be engineered hardwood going into the room and if possible I would like to avoid a lower track where I would have to drill into the flooring.
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  • closet_door.jpg
7 replies
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
22397 posts
21019 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
We have several ceiling track (old style) bifolds in our house
The positives are they are easy to operate
And do reveal almost 100% of the space when folded open

Downside ...
Most folks consider bifolds to be old fashioned now

This house built 40 ish years ago
And the bifolds were standard
Builder would “upgrade” to sliding doors

So our house has a mix of each

The sliders ALL SUCK
They look cheap (mirror, fake wood, textured panels)
Every.single.one has track issues ... grrr
Where the plain wood bifolds all operate smoothly

* NOTE - Wood bifolds. No cheap prefab stuff.
Nice sturdy wood. Either solid or louvred.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Oct 6, 2010
15502 posts
10121 upvotes
Toronto
I have bifolds installed in my closets and I didn't drill a track into the floor. You have a run rail along the top and the bottom piece, the "L" shaped bracket only needs to be drilled into the side casing. It doesn't need to be drilled into the floor. It's sole purpose is to keep the bottom of the door from moving and allowing you to adjust the height.

If the door doesn't operate smoothly, than it's not installed correctly.
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Deal Addict
Sep 5, 2011
1094 posts
1912 upvotes
Toronto
How about this hardware kit?

No lower guide needed. Ball-baring guides so it should be pretty smooth. Can handle up to 80kg.

https://www.richelieu.com/ca/en/categor ... KIT1220380
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 15, 2007
602 posts
159 upvotes
Toronto
PCShutters wrote: How about this hardware kit?

No lower guide needed. Ball-baring guides so it should be pretty smooth. Can handle up to 80kg.

https://www.richelieu.com/ca/en/categor ... KIT1220380
That looks like a good option, except for the bottom pivot which looks like it is screwed to the floor, but probably could be modified to screw in to a baseboard instead.

Does Richelieu sell to the public?
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11767 posts
6955 upvotes
Paris
nonlinear wrote: That looks like a good option, except for the bottom pivot which looks like it is screwed to the floor, but probably could be modified to screw in to a baseboard instead.

Does Richelieu sell to the public?
Call them and they will give you options of who will sell it to you.

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