Computers & Electronics

Hardwire Ethernet to my laptop in the basement office

  • Last Updated:
  • May 31st, 2020 3:59 pm
[OP]
Member
Jul 18, 2007
443 posts
66 upvotes

Hardwire Ethernet to my laptop in the basement office

Now that everyone is working from home (and potentially for the near future) I have had to set up an office in my finished basement where the Wifi signal is not very good, the router is upstairs in the office being used by my wife. I need some help understanding what my options are. (Note: I have a coxial cable outlet, power outlet and phone cable outlet all near my desk and I sit 10 feet from the modem connection near the fuse box..running wires through the wall is not an option unless I pay someone)

Any help would be appreciated!
45 replies
Sr. Member
Jun 21, 2008
537 posts
140 upvotes
mississauga
do you have ethernet port on the laptop, if yes POE(power over ethernet) is the best solution. Post here if you need more info
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 22, 2012
4069 posts
3491 upvotes
Richmond Hill
jensen1 wrote: do you have ethernet port on the laptop, if yes POE(power over ethernet) is the best solution. Post here if you need more info
You mean powerline networking? Power over Ethernet supplies electric power through the Ethernet cabling, so unless he want to charge his laptop... Face With Stuck-out Tongue And Tightly-closed Eyes

Anyways, if he doesn't have cable TV at home, MoCA could be a good alternative.
[OP]
Member
Jul 18, 2007
443 posts
66 upvotes
Yes I do have an ethernet port.

How reliable are these and are they just not like wifi extenders that you plug into?

Basement has concrete wall and that hurts connectivity.
jensen1 wrote: do you have ethernet port on the laptop, if yes POE(power over ethernet) is the best solution. Post here if you need more info
[OP]
Member
Jul 18, 2007
443 posts
66 upvotes
I do have cable tv and the outlet is near my desk.
rugerty100 wrote: You mean powerline networking? Power over Ethernet supplies electric power through the Ethernet cabling, so unless he want to charge his laptop... Face With Stuck-out Tongue And Tightly-closed Eyes

Anyways, if he doesn't have cable TV at home, MoCA could be a good alternative.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 22, 2012
4069 posts
3491 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Powerline Networking is really YMMV. It depends a lot on the wiring of your house and may be affected by electrical interference when you run other appliances.

The only way to find out if it works for you is to try it out.

Personally, I'm using the TP-Link TL-PA9020P AV2000 Powerline Adapter Kit and it works decently for my needs. Low latency and reliable (even with vacuum cleaners/vitamix running) but nowhere near the rated speeds.

With Speedtest.net, I'm receiving 80/15 with Powerline and 200/15 with Ethernet (on a 150/15 plan).

IIRC, MoCA is typically better but more expensive.
[OP]
Member
Jul 18, 2007
443 posts
66 upvotes
Thank you, I am going to order the following from Amazon today and will see which one works best:

1. Actiontec MOCA Adapter - which I understand I connects to the coxial outlet (cable outlet) and then through an Ethernet cable to my laptop, correct?
2. TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter Kit - which I plug into the wall and then connect through Ethernet cable to my laptop, corect?

rugerty100 wrote: Powerline Networking is really YMMV. It depends a lot on the wiring of your house and may be affected by electrical interference when you run other appliances.

The only way to find out if it works for you is to try it out.

Personally, I'm using the TP-Link TL-PA9020P AV2000 Powerline Adapter Kit and it works decently for my needs. Low latency and reliable (even with vacuum cleaners/vitamix running) but nowhere near the rated speeds.

With Speedtest.net, I'm receiving 80/15 with Powerline and 200/15 with Ethernet (on a 150/15 plan).

IIRC, MoCA is typically better but more expensive.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 22, 2012
4069 posts
3491 upvotes
Richmond Hill
q1w2e3r4 wrote: Thank you, I am going to order the following from Amazon today and will see which one works best:

1. Actiontec MOCA Adapter - which I understand I connects to the coxial outlet (cable outlet) and then through an Ethernet cable to my laptop, correct?
2. TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter Kit - which I plug into the wall and then connect through Ethernet cable to my laptop, corect?
Correct. Plus the other side where you connect the corresponding outlet to your router.

I ended up choosing Powerline for my room because it was cheaper and because the layout of my room made routing coaxial difficult.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 18, 2008
942 posts
73 upvotes
Do you have a landline? i.e. do you use your phone cable? If you have a new-ish house you may have cat5 phone lines brought to the demarc point (my 12 year old house was wired like this). You can switch them to rj45 network jacks.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6065 posts
3145 upvotes
Mississauga
OP says the modem connection is near his proposed new office space but the router is upstairs. Where is the modem? If it's by the fuse box how does the modem connect to the router? If it's via ethernet, why not relocate the router to near the modem, maintain the existing ethernet to the upstairs and run another ethernet to the new office space location?
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
18833 posts
4944 upvotes
Toronto
Traditional telephone wires are CAT 3. However these days a lot of phone lines are actually CAT5. If CAT5, and you have an extra line, you may be able to connect it up to your Ethernet network.

MoCA will work well over RG6 cable, but the adapters are expensive.

Note though, if these options don’t work, you could rework your WiFi network. You could use a WiFi extender, or else add a second WiFi access point connected by an Ethernet cable (or by converted CAT5 from the phone or via MoCA). Are you saying your house is 3 floors including basement, and you have the WiFi router and modem on the 2nd floor, two floors up from the basement? Is there any way to move that to the middle floor / 1st floor? If so that might be enough to solve your WiFi problems.

Or can you run Ethernet somehow? In my house to run some extra Ethernet lines, instead of trying to fish Ethernet through the walls, I actually drilled holes to the outside and ran outdoor Ethernet cable on the exterior of the house. This was actually the easiest most reliable solution. All that was needed was a big fat and long drill bit that could drill through cinder block, along with a bit of exterior CAT5e Ethernet cable.
Sr. Member
Dec 14, 2004
835 posts
116 upvotes
Waterloo
I’m making some assumptions here but have you considered moving the router/modem to the main floor?
[OP]
Member
Jul 18, 2007
443 posts
66 upvotes
Two storied house with finished basement, office is on the main floor, cable modem connection, already tried moving the router to the basement but it kills the Wifi connection upstairs and on the second floor.

Also forgot to add the modem has a Ethernet port on it and I tried a standard Ethernet cat6 cable with no luck, but read the manual for the modem and it appears I need a crossover Ethernet cable which will allow me to connect directly into the modem, ordered one from Amazon for $15, if it works great if not I will try the previous two suggestions mentioned earlier in this thread...crossing my fingers!
mrweather wrote: OP says the modem connection is near his proposed new office space but the router is upstairs. Where is the modem? If it's by the fuse box how does the modem connect to the router? If it's via ethernet, why not relocate the router to near the modem, maintain the existing ethernet to the upstairs and run another ethernet to the new office space location?
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
18833 posts
4944 upvotes
Toronto
q1w2e3r4 wrote: Two storied house with finished basement, office is on the main floor, cable modem connection, already tried moving the router to the basement but it kills the Wifi connection upstairs and on the second floor.

Also forgot to add the modem has a Ethernet port on it and I tried a standard Ethernet cat6 cable with no luck, but read the manual for the modem and it appears I need a crossover Ethernet cable which will allow me to connect directly into the modem, ordered one from Amazon for $15, if it works great if not I will try the previous two suggestions mentioned earlier in this thread...crossing my fingers!
Crossover cables are usually unnecessary in 2020, since most stuff just reconfigures automatically. If an Ethernet cable is not working then it’s probably not set up correctly. It might help if you posted the router and a picture of the ports, as well as a screen grab of the settings.

It sounds like all you might need are WiFi extenders or a mesh router setup (although having an Ethernet backbone with multiple connected Ethernet ports around the house would be the best solution, even with a mesh setup).

Actually, in some cases just getting a stronger WiFi router would solve the problem, but I don’t know which router you have.

MoCA is good. However, you need two MoCA adapters, one on each end. Powerline is the same way, but I would not recommend Powerline in most cases.
[OP]
Member
Jul 18, 2007
443 posts
66 upvotes
This is the modem I am trying to hardwire to in the basement...https://armstrongonewire.com/Content/Do ... manual.pdf

This is the what is in my wife's office on the main floor - Hitron CODA 4582 (connected via coaxial cable)

Could I ask Rogers to update the modem to something newer?
EugW wrote: Crossover cables are usually unnecessary in 2020, since most stuff just reconfigures automatically. If an Ethernet cable is not working then it’s probably not set up correctly. It might help if you posted the router and a picture of the ports, as well as a screen grab of the settings.

It sounds like all you might need are WiFi extenders or a mesh router setup (although having an Ethernet backbone with multiple connected Ethernet ports around the house would be the best solution, even with a mesh setup).

Actually, in some cases just getting a stronger WiFi router would solve the problem, but I don’t know which router you have.

MoCA is good. However, you need two MoCA adapters, one on each end. Powerline is the same way, but I would not recommend Powerline in most cases.
Last edited by q1w2e3r4 on May 2nd, 2020 11:04 am, edited 2 times in total.
Member
Sep 30, 2015
231 posts
58 upvotes
York, ON
I use Powerline adaptor, and it is very reliable. My modem is in the basement and my desktop is on the second floor.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6065 posts
3145 upvotes
Mississauga
q1w2e3r4 wrote: Two storied house with finished basement, office is on the main floor, cable modem connection, already tried moving the router to the basement but it kills the Wifi connection upstairs and on the second floor.
Okay, there are ways around that. If you have a second router kicking around you could put it in the office in AP mode to provide wifi on the upper levels as well ethernet since it’ll work as a switch too.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
18833 posts
4944 upvotes
Toronto
q1w2e3r4 wrote: This is the modem I am trying to hardwire to in the basement...https://armstrongonewire.com/Content/Do ... manual.pdf

This is the what is in my wife's office on the main floor - Hitron CODA 4582 (connected via coaxial cable)

Could I ask Rogers to update the modem to something newer?
As mentioned, maybe all you need is just to get a proper stronger router or else a mesh WiFi system, and connect it up to the CODA 4582. You just have to put the CODA 4582 into bridge mode.

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support ... e-coda4582

For example, I have a Rogers CODA4582 as well and use a multiple access point system made of Apple Airport Extremes (that I picked up cheap on eBay), on a wired Ethernet backbone. The CODA4582 is labelled as "Internet" in this picture and my router is the Apple AirPort Extreme labelled "Basement". The other four Airport Extremes are functioning as dumb access points. This is overkill for you (and my setup is really best suited for homes with mainly Apple mobile devices) but it illustrates that the CODA4582 works great in bridge mode.

FE15AF36-5DE5-484C-AA84-7772E0964FE1.png

For you if you wanted to go a multiple access point system without running wires, there are lots of consumer mesh WiFi systems available out there that would probably suit your needs, esp. if you're not using Rogers Ignite TV.

https://www.tomsguide.com/us/best-mesh- ... -5191.html

Note that Rogers also rents WiFi extenders for their CODA4582 but I don't know how well they work. They are $4 each per month, +/- installation.

https://www.rogers.com/consumer/interne ... fi-network
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
33287 posts
6969 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
First off. You don’t need a crossover cable. That is only used between two switches. But all modern switches have built in detection and does not require a crossover cable.

Second, it appears the “modem” by your fuse panel is for the telephone. I am guessing that you have Rogers Home Phone. That modem does not provide any internet service. Plugging a cable into that will not do anything.

Where is the CODA 4582 located relatively to your office in the basement?
How old is the house?
How big is the house?

Running Ethernet is the best, but if that is not an option, then I suggest you get an EAP 245 that is currently on sale on Amazon and plug that into Rogers modem upstairs. This will replace your Rogers WiFi and should provide a strong enough single for the whole house.

Top