Shopping Discussion

Have questions about diamonds and engagement rings, ASK ME ANYTHING...

Poll: What is most important in your ONLINE diamond shopping experience?

  • Total votes: 595. You have voted on this poll.
Price
 
338
57%
Selection
 
42
7%
Reputation
 
153
26%
Information
 
31
5%
Addons (warranties, trade up policies, free cleanings)
 
6
1%
Location (Canada, U.S.)
 
4
1%
Customer Service, purchase assistance
 
21
4%
[OP]
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Jul 29, 2013
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Hi missto, check on the second page of the thread I answered these questions for Hunkahunkaburninglove. If I missed anything let me know.
[OP]
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Diamond Tip 6: when buying a diamond be sure to view it in a variety of lighting environments, this will give you a more rounded view of how the diamond will look day to day and ultimately help you in making a more informed purchase.
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thediamondshopper wrote: Diamond Tip 6: when buying a diamond be sure to view it in a variety of lighting environments, this will give you a more rounded view of how the diamond will look day to day and ultimately help you in making a more informed purchase.
Does the type/design of the setting affect the sparkle quality of a set diamond? Can a bad setting possibly rob a diamond of it's glitter?
What setting do you recommend for a typical simple band engagement ring? Four prong prefab, six prong, channel set, etc?

Blue diamonds seemed all the rage in the Caribbean a few years ago. Are they as valuable as colourless diamonds? Are all blue ones irradiated to obtain their special colour?

Ps : glad to see this thread restored. I don't see any content against the RFD rules.
My avatar is Shandi Finnessey
Play Hay Day!
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Aug 9, 2013
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What do you think about this diamond?
Cushion, 2.00, Very Good, D, VVS1, C$28,140
[OP]
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missto wrote: What do you think about this diamond?
Cushion, 2.00, Very Good, D, VVS1, C$28,140
Hi, Missto

I would need a little more info to offer an informed opinion, do you have a certificate number for the diamond, was it graded by GIA, AGS, EGL ect?
[OP]
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Diamond Tip #6: When viewing the clarity maps on diamond certificates, don't place too much emphasis on how these appear as they are intended to show where inclusions are and are not 3 dimensional like a diamond is and will often appear much messier than the actual diamond.
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Nov 6, 2007
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I have two questions OP!

1. How do you tell a diamond is none conflict diamond from AGS or GIA report? One of the reason I was deciding to get Canadian diamond or brand name was because they aren't conflict diamonds (I know Tiffany and Cartier's diamonds all go through Kimberley process)

2. My friend bought an engagement from a local store for less than $15000 yet the appraisal value is $30000 for insurance. Why is that? How do insurance companies go about paying you for your lost of engagement if that happens?

Thanks
[OP]
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Hi Aritzia ,

despite popular belief there are very few conflict diamonds coming in to the market and every reputable dealer will be Kimberly Process compliant. Most of the diamonds on the market come from a handful of major companies Debeers and Riotinto to name a few. Cutters, wholesalers ect bid for rights to buy from these companies and the diamonds move through the chain, in a track able manner and in compliance with the Kimberly Process. If you ask any reputable person carrying diamonds they will be able to explain how they can show the Diamond is KP compliant.

On appraisal and insurance values, what you have to keep in mind is that diamond grading and value appraising are subjective. The appraiser has room, not unlimited room, but some room to exercise judgement and this is why you see great differences between fair market value and retail value. I just made a ring not that long ago that cost 11000 and was appraised by a reputable appraiser for $34000. The insurance companies are well aware of this and if they don't like the value they will offer a replacement or have their own appraiser argue a lower value.
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Jun 28, 2006
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When buying online;

which sites do you prefer for stones and what should you look for exactly to make sure you get a beautiful stone since most if not all sites don't show the diamond. I believe only James Allen shows the diamond.
[OP]
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cns187 wrote: When buying online;

which sites do you prefer for stones and what should you look for exactly to make sure you get a beautiful stone since most if not all sites don't show the diamond. I believe only James Allen shows the diamond.
Provided the site has an adequate return policy, and does not charge a restocking fee you should be in good hands. James Allen is a reputable vedor as is blue nile, white flash ect. determining the right vendor depends on what level of involvement you want from them. Sites like James Allen and Blue Nile offer mainly virtual inventory, inventory that is available to just about any retailer. These sites usually do not have a wealth of information about the diamonds, and IMO are more of a find it your self kind of operation. On the other hand Good old Gold and White Flash are very well know for specializing in well cut diamonds and they contain a wealth of information about the diamonds they have in stock. Price wise the more service they offer generally speaking the more of a premium they charge for similar diamonds. So in short who is the best for you depends on what you are looking for from a diamond retailer.

A picture of a diamond is not necessarily the best way to shop for one, many sites do not have pictures because they dont physically have the diamond, it is in a wholesalers inventory. In some cases the pictures you see may be stock photos so make sure that you looking at an actual picture of the diamond you are interested in. Most retailers if you are interested in a diamond will be able to get pictures for you, but these pictures are close ups of inclusions that you will not see with your eye any way. My best advice, either take to the net and learn about what makes a good cut ect and shop armed with info, or if you do not want to get that involved work with a retailer who will do the work for you.

I outlined a few tips on this forum that are pretty basic, to ensure a nice stone I would personally recommend going with an AGS 000 or at least GIA XXX and for color and clarity stay at or above SI1 and H for color, or possibly SI2 and I if you are working with some one very hands on who will detremine if they are good I's and SI2's as some will show yellow or have visible inclusions.
[OP]
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HunkaHunkaBurningLove wrote: Does the type/design of the setting affect the sparkle quality of a set diamond? Can a bad setting possibly rob a diamond of it's glitter?
What setting do you recommend for a typical simple band engagement ring? Four prong prefab, six prong, channel set, etc?

Blue diamonds seemed all the rage in the Caribbean a few years ago. Are they as valuable as colorless diamonds? Are all blue ones irradiated to obtain their special color?

Ps : glad to see this thread restored. I don't see any content against the RFD rules.
Sorry Hunkahunkaburniglove I didnt see your post till now. The sparkle quality of a diamond is determined by two things the amount of light entering the stone and the angles of the proportions which determines how light moves around within the diamond. That being said with light entering in to the diamond through mostly the table and also less so through the star, bezel, and upper girdle facets. The light then bounces off the lower girdle and pavilion facets and moves around throughout the stone exiting in part to your eye. So as long as the setting does not interfere with light entering the diamond, mainly through the table and other small facets it will not adversely affect the sparkle. There are great examples of all of the styles you mentioned, and depending on the construction it is hard to say that one is necessarily better than the other, rather it is a matter of personal taste.

I know at one point diamonds with strong blue fluorescence, were called blue white diamonds until this moniker was deemed misleading. I know there are natural blue diamonds, which are quite rare as are most diamonds in colors other than brown and yellow. There are also lots of irradiated diamonds in every color, and if these are graded by a reputable lad it will be noted that the color is artificially enhanced if they do grade them at all.
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Feb 9, 2012
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Is it at all possible to simply buy an engagement "CE" diamond for A LOT less (crazy low), or am I still better off going for Cubic Zirconia when basement pricing is the plan?
(It's a long story, involving an already missing ring. She agreed to accept the "prove you won't lose this ring first..." reasoning.)
Basically, something "expensive looking" that is so low in price, but won't go green on us. (hence the reason for the "ce" preference.)
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playnicee1 wrote: Is it at all possible to simply buy an engagement "CE" diamond for A LOT less (crazy low), or am I still better off going for Cubic Zirconia when basement pricing is the plan?
(It's a long story, involving an already missing ring. She agreed to accept the "prove you won't lose this ring first..." reasoning.)
Basically, something "expensive looking" that is so low in price, but won't go green on us. (hence the reason for the "ce" preference.)
Hi Playnicee1,

CE diamonds are still quite pricey, they are less so compared to non CE diamonds but ultimately if you are looking for rock bottom an exceptionally well cut CZ is the way to go. There is also the option of white sapphires which when cut right look quite nice and are relatively cheap as well. A decent 1-2ct white sapphire can be had for a few hundred dollars up to a few thousand depending on the cut.
[OP]
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Diamond Tip #7: The color of a diamond (D-Z) has absolutely no effect on the brilliance, fire and scintillation of the diamond.

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