Computers & Electronics

HDTVTest OLED burn-in test complete: No burn in after 6 months, 20 hours per day.

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 28th, 2019 9:32 am
[OP]
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Mar 23, 2009
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HDTVTest OLED burn-in test complete: No burn in after 6 months, 20 hours per day.

HDTVTest has just completed their 6 month 20 hours per day burn-in test, which they claim better simulates regular home usage. Vincent had an app controlling a Logitech Harmony setup, running the TV 20 hours per day, alternating between three TV channels.

No burn-in at all, after 3740 hours (187 days at 20 hours per day). TV is an LG 65" E8 that Vincent bought himself.



One good point he made about burn-in on in-store demo TVs is that those TVs often are set up in such a way as to never get a pixel refresh cycle. The TVs are turned on and run all day, sometimes playing the same content over and over again, but then at the end of the day they are hard shut off via a power switch at the power bar so they never go into standby mode. Standby mode is necessary to engage the pixel refresh cycle.

FWIW, my LG C8 is now over a year old and has no burn-in either. However, I don't play any video games with HUDs for extended periods, nor do I leave news channels playing all day long. Our usage alternates between mainly broadcast and cable TV, Netflix and Prime Video, and Blu-ray.
11 replies
Member
Jul 16, 2008
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ON
Many still believe OLED are easily burn-in. This will proof them otherwise.
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Mar 23, 2008
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j3390659 wrote:
Aug 27th, 2019 12:39 pm
Many still believe OLED are easily burn-in. This will proof them otherwise.
Facts have no place in an Internet forum...

C
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Aug 30, 2007
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Thanks, good to know. I actually saw fairly obvious burn-in marks on this video, in red and especially blue channels. Nothing dramatic, but they are obviously there, and will only get worse with time.

We are contemplating buying our first OLED TV, and burn in is our largest worry. After spending that much on a TV the expectation should be it will last trouble free for at least 10 years, and as far as I can tell this will not happen with current OLEDs. Especially in our case - we watch a lot of boxed content (4:3 and 2.35:1) - probably 50% of screen time. This will show up as burn in, given enough of time. The youtube test didn't test this scenario: it sounds like ~90% of their content was filling the screen (with no black bars).
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Feb 24, 2018
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This should be in the Controversial forum for the amount of furor it will drive.
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Aug 19, 2018
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pulsar123 wrote:
Aug 27th, 2019 2:23 pm
Thanks, good to know. I actually saw fairly obvious burn-in marks on this video, in red and especially blue channels. Nothing dramatic, but they are obviously there, and will only get worse with time
I believe what you think are burn-in, are actually reflections. There is no burn-in in this video on the TV.
We are contemplating buying our first OLED TV, and burn in is our largest worry. After spending that much on a TV the expectation should be it will last trouble free for at least 10 years, and as far as I can tell this will not happen with current OLEDs. Especially in our case - we watch a lot of boxed content (4:3 and 2.35:1) - probably 50% of screen time. This will show up as burn in, given enough of time. The youtube test didn't test this scenario: it sounds like ~90% of their content was filling the screen (with no black bars).
The letterbox problem should be resolved by the pixel refresh cycle. As far as I know, there is no evidence that boxed content creates more burn-in than normal content.
[OP]
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pulsar123 wrote:
Aug 27th, 2019 2:23 pm
Thanks, good to know. I actually saw fairly obvious burn-in marks on this video, in red and especially blue channels. Nothing dramatic, but they are obviously there, and will only get worse with time.
I agree with Cucumference... and with Vincent Teoh... There is no burn-in at all in that video.

I'm not saying that OLEDs can't burn in, because they can, but it's not present on that TV.
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Nov 25, 2009
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Maybe they should have left it on CNN for a while.
[OP]
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FrostyWinnipeg wrote:
Aug 28th, 2019 12:37 am
Maybe they should have left it on CNN for a while.
Already been done by RTINGs.
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Aug 30, 2007
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If it were reflections, it would also show up in other colors, but it only did in red (just a bit) and blue. Again, nothing that would register in real life TV usage, but the worry is this will magnify with time. I am pretty sure this will become obvious after a few years of work.

The problem is not with specific technology - whether it's OLED, regular LED, or even tiny tungsten bulbs - they will all change brightness with usage, so will all have burn in. The fundamental issue here is that the light is produced at the pixel level. I think the only proper solution is to have a tiny sensor sitting on top of each pixel which measures the actual brightness of the pixel, which can be used to compensate the brightness loss with time. A feedback loop, in other words. Hopefully this is something companies are working on.
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Aug 20, 2009
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Grimsby
3 years with my OLED, mixed usage. Everything from 100+ hours of Breath of the Wild to movies to static TV. No noticeable burn in, friends still marvel at the picture when they come by too. I'm not worried, already got my moneys worth anyway.
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Feb 19, 2008
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pulsar123 wrote:
Aug 28th, 2019 8:47 am
If it were reflections, it would also show up in other colors, but it only did in red (just a bit) and blue. Again, nothing that would register in real life TV usage, but the worry is this will magnify with time. I am pretty sure this will become obvious after a few years of work.

The problem is not with specific technology - whether it's OLED, regular LED, or even tiny tungsten bulbs - they will all change brightness with usage, so will all have burn in. The fundamental issue here is that the light is produced at the pixel level. I think the only proper solution is to have a tiny sensor sitting on top of each pixel which measures the actual brightness of the pixel, which can be used to compensate the brightness loss with time. A feedback loop, in other words. Hopefully this is something companies are working on.
Nope, you're definitely seeing reflections.

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